I hear dead people – Rock’s Back Pages

No, I am not a psychic, I have been listening to dead musicians. Big deal you say, you can hear dead musicians all the time by turning on the radio or just listening to some of the music on Spotify. What I have been listening to is audio interviews of musicians on Rock’s Back Pages, (there are also audio interviews with musicians who are still alive, if listening to people beyond the grave is not your thing).

Here’s my list of audio interviews from Rock’s Backpages (all deceased)

Rock’s Back Pages has a huge variety of articles from heaps of different music publications like New Musical Express (NME), Real Groove and Rolling Stone. You will find artists (both dead and alive) like Ella Fitzgerald, Lorde, Joy Division and the White Stripes and so much more. Check out this fantastic eResource – it’s like going through a record collection in a second hand store, you never know what you will find.

Bloomsbury Popular Music

We are proud to present our newest eResource Bloomsbury Popular Music. This eResource has a huge amount of information on music from 1900 to present. It includes all eleven volumes of Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Popular Music of the World, over 120 titles of the widely acclaimed 33 1/3 series, and an expanding collection of scholarly titles.

Use it to:

  • Explore the historical origins and cultural impact of popular music from almost every country in the world;
  • Discover more about influential artists and albums, and local music scenes and subcultures;
  • Learn about everything from musical form and instruments to the workings of the music industry;
  • Research the social, political and economic context of different musical genres.

Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Popular Music

The Encyclopaedia of Popular Music of the World, over 20 years in the making, is a landmark reference work in its field. Each volume, authored by top contributors from around the world, includes discussions on cultural, historical and geographic origins; technical musical characteristics; instrumentation and use of voice; lyrics and language; typical features of performance and presentation; historical development and paths and modes of dissemination; influence of technology, the music industry and political and economic circumstances; changing stylistic features; notable and influential performers; and relationships to other genres and sub-genres.

33 1/3 Series

33 1/3 is a series of short books about popular music, focusing on individual albums by artists ranging from James Brown to Celine Dion and from J Dilla to Neutral Milk Hotel. Each album covered in the series occupies a specific place in music history, so each book-length treatment takes an individualized approach. 33 1/3 is widely acclaimed by fans, musicians, and scholars alike.

 

Scholarly books on Popular Music Studies

The Bloomsbury Popular Music Studies list consists of an expanding range of scholarly books ranging from edited volumes to biographies to historical overviews, and that span genres, including rock, pop, hip hop, and punk. Titles include and David Boucher’s Dylan and Cohen, James Braxton Peterson’s Hip Hop Headphones and Kevin Dunn’s Global Punk.

Credo Reference for ESL Students

Are you an ESL (English as a second language) student studying for a qualification in New Zealand? Are you looking for a dictionary which can clearly explain jargon in a Science subject or provide a context for understanding an issue in Social Sciences? Are you unsure about starting a research project or getting ideas to write an essay? If so, Credo Reference will provide a solution for you.

Credo Reference is an online reference resource which contains general and subject dictionaries and encyclopedias. It develops students’ information literacy skills necessary for success in academic life. For ESL students, Credo Reference can be used in two ways.

Credo Reference as an advanced dictionary

For ESL students, studying a subject in New Zealand is learning a language within a language. It is challenging to read an article full of jargon although you may have already reached a high level of English proficiency. The topic page of Credo Reference can be used as an advanced dictionary to support your learning. Let’s try the functions of Credo Reference with a specific example.

If you are studying Echinodermata in Marine Biology, you can type the term in the search box of the Credo Reference main webpage to gain a whole picture of the species. Not only does the Echinodermata topic page of Credo Reference give a definition of the term but also provides a thorough explanation including anatomy, physiology and different classes of the species. It also presents the term in a relational network with a mind map so that you will understand related concepts such as “urchin” and “sea otter”. Moreover, audio and visual aids on the page are helpful supplements for the text. By clicking the sound icon on the top of the page you can listen to the text. This audio aid is useful to familiarize yourself with academic talks and prepare you for attending seminars in this discipline. The images of Echinodermata give you an idea what the creatures look like in the real world.

Credo Reference as a starting-point for a research project or an essay

For ELS students, the difficulty in doing a research project or writing an essay in Social Science and Humanities is a lack of general knowledge on a topic due to their social and cultural backgrounds which may be very different from those of New Zealand. Credo Reference can solve this problem. For example, “ethnicity” is a topic appearing frequently on essay questions. Typing the word “ethnicity” in the search box of Credo Reference’s main page, you will see entries based on resources from various subjects such as anthropology, sociology and cultural studies. With these entries, you can understand the historical origin, controversies and debates around the concept. The mind map shows the relationship between ethnicity and race. They are a pair of concepts between which students are easily confused. Generally, Credo Reference enables you to understand a topic in context so that you can engage it with critical thinking and do further research on the topic.

To use Credo Reference, you need to join Christchurch City Libraries and use your library card number and password/PIN to access this eResource. Then, Credo Reference will provide you a successful learning experience.

Find more information

Hong Wang
Network Library Assistant

Digging up the past

New Zealand Archaeology Week runs from 28 April – 6 May, with events up and down the country, including an exhibition courtesy of Underground Overground Archaeology at our own South Library called Pubs of the Past: the archaeology of Victorian Christchurch Hotels, so this seems like a good time to mention some of the archaeological books, magazines, and other resources that you can find at Christchurch City Libraries.

Books

The Library has thousands of books and eBooks about archaeology for both adults and children. Because archaeology lies at the interface between art, history, and science, books on this subject can be found in several different places among our non-fiction collection, so if you’re having troubling finding what you’re looking for, then ask a librarian for help.

Here is a list of a few of my personal favourites that have recently been added to the library’s shelves, including some fiction that features archaeologists as characters…

Archaeology

List created by robcruickshank

Books about archaeology and archaeologists for adults and children, including both fiction and non-fiction

The 50 Greatest Prehistoric Sites of the WorldCover of The 50 greatest prehistoric sites of the world – A guide book to archaeological sites

A’a – The fascinating story of a Polynesian artefact, now in the British Museum, that became an inspiration for Picasso

Anglo-Saxon Attitudes – The consequences of an archaeological hoax come back to haunt the characters of this 1956 novel

Built on Bones – What happened when we started to live together in cities? – the archaeological evidence

Cover of Cigars of the PharaohCigars of the Pharaoh – A classic!Cigars of the Pharaoh

The Incredible Cabinet of Wonders – Not just archaeology, but I love this children’s “lift the flap” bookThe Incredible Cabinet of Wonders

Keeping Their Marbles – The uncomfortable story of how archaeological objects from around the world were acquired by western museums, often by coercion and theft

Cover of A little history of Archaeology by Brian Fagan

A Little History of Archaeology – Stories of some of the great archaeologists and what they found – one of the “Little Histories” series

Lost in A Pyramid – Twelve tales from the golden age of the mummy story, collected and published by the British Library

Mayan Mendacity – The second mystery for Dr Elizabeth Pimms, archaeologist and librarian – sequal to Olmec Obituary

My Life in Ruins – What is it actually like to be an archaeologist?

Cover of The quest for ZThe Quest for Z – A delightful retelling for children of a doomed expedition to find a lost city in the Amazon jungle

The Story of Tutankhamun – A beautifully illustrated book for children about perhaps the most celebrated of ancient Egyptian pharaohs

View Full List

Magazines and eMagazines

The magazine Archaeology is available both as a hard copy and as an e-magazine through RBDigital. Check out the January/February 2018 edition for an article called “New Zealand’s First City, Uncovered”, which tells the stories of the early European colonists of Christchurch through some of the artefacts found among the rubble in the aftermath of the Christchurch earthquakes, as well as presenting evidence of earlier occupation by Māori dating back as far as 1250 AD.

We also have many other general science and history magazines that include articles about archaeology, such as All About History, BBC History Magazine, DiscoverSmithsonian Magazine, etc., in both hard copy and digital formats. Check out the library catalogue for details.

eResources

A library card gets you free access to a huge number of electronic resources that contain information about archaeology, many of which can be accessed from home. The best way to find out about these is to log on a take a look. In particular, you might want to check out some of these:

These are in addition to our extensive collection of eResources about local and family history. If you are a Christchurch resident, but not yet a member of the library, you can join online, with the option of a digital only membership if you just want access to our online resources.

Other places of archaeological interest in and around Christchurch

Fans of Egyptology should check out Tash Pen Khonsu, an Egyptian mummy on display at Canterbury Museum. For those with more classical tastes, the Teece Museum of Classical Antiquities, run by the University of Canterbury, is well worth a visit. This relatively new museum opened in May 2017 and is located in the recently refurbished Arts Centre on Level 1 of the Old Chemistry Building at 3 Hereford Street. It is currently closed, but will re-open during New Zealand Archaeology Week on 5 May with an exhibition called “Beyond the Grave: Death in Ancient Times”.

More information about archaeological sites in Christchurch can be found on the websites of Christchurch City Council and Heritage New Zealand (formerly known as the Historic Places Trust), which has an extensive archaeology section that includes a wealth of fascinating and useful information, and of course on our own Library Website.

Happy digging!

Podcast – Food waste

Speak Up Kōrerotia logoChristchurch City Libraries blog hosts a series of regular podcasts from specialist human rights radio show Speak up – Kōrerotia. This show is created by Sally Carlton.

If food waste were a country, it would be the third-biggest greenhouse gas emitter after China and the United States. Added to this immense environmental impact is the social impact: How much food is thrown away that could be eaten?

Join our guests as they share statistics and information about the various ways in which they work to repurpose food waste and save it from landfill.

Guests:

Transcript – Food waste

Find out more in our collection

Cover of Waste: Uncovering the global food scandal Cover of The waste not want no cookbook Cover of Scrap wilt and weeds Cover of American wasteland Cover of Too good to waste Cover of Leftover gourmet Cover of Eat it up Cover of My zero-waste kitchen Cover of How to make and use compost Cover of This book stinks Cover of Making a meal of itCover of Waste free kitchen handbookCover of Food waste

More about Speak up – Kōrerotia

The show is also available on the following platforms:

Start your research with Credo Reference

The thought of starting research can be daunting, so a great starting place is a hidden gem of an eResource  – Credo Reference.

Credo Reference is a collection of over 800 reference eBooks with full text articles, images, and videos covering a huge variety of information –  for all ages.

To show you how it works, I have started by searching Anzac Day.

Top result is from the eBook Holiday Symbols and Customs.
This title covers the origins of the day, and symbols and customs such as Dawn Service, Anzac Day parades, and the Australian gambling game Two-up.

From the results page, Credo offers you a Mind Map tool so you can search other related topics on Credo. Below is the example Mind Map of Anzac Day. You can then find information on certain battles, Gallipoli, and other remembrance days. List of sources will be on the right side of the page if you want to read more about any of the mind map headings.

Credo is a great place to start your research, it is easy to use and using tools like Mind Map it can take your quest for information in a different directions.

Record Store Day – Saturday 21 April 2018

Record Store Day is on this Saturday 21 April. It is an annual international event designed to celebrate the record store as a community. For more info, read Russell Brown’s Friday Music post The Shopping news and What’s happening for Record Store Day across NZ, this Saturday? Peter McLennan on Dub dot dash.
Here is our compilation of what’s happening here in Ōtautahi.

What’s on in Christchurch

Galaxy Records

Galaxy Records on 336 St Asaph St are an “Indie Institution’ in Christchurch, selling new and used vinyl. Like Galaxy Records on Facebook.
Record Store Day at Galaxy Records: Subscribe to the Facebook event
Rare & Collectable goodies! Featuring DJs: Pinacolada Soundsystem , Missy G & Skew-whiff from midday. Darkroom Bar will be open

Lyttelton Records

Lyttelton Records have spilled out of their home recording studio to open a shop (and bar) in Woolston. You can buy merch here, guitar strings and maybe catch a live performance. Like Lyttelton Records on Facebook.
Record Store Day at Lyttelton Records: Vinyl discounts, live music, happy hour 12pm to 4pm 650 Ferry Road

Penny Lane Records

If you are a record store fan in Christchurch, you can visit Penny Lane Records – they are at Eastgate Mall in Linwood, and in Sydenham at 430 Colombo Street. Penny Lane specialise in great quality second-hand music formats and collectibles. Like Penny Lane Records on Facebook.
Record Store Day at Penny Lane Records: The crew were cagey as to what’s happening – so there might be some good surprises on offer. What they did say was they are open at 8am, there will be Record Store Day exclusives available, and stuff happening for customers, as well as specials.

(here’s a pic from RSD 2017 at Penny Lane)

Sadhana Surf and House of Creativity

Sadhana Surfboards is at Shop 52 at The Tannery, 3 Garlands Road Woolston. Like Sadhana Surf on Facebook

sadhana
Sadhana Surfboards

Another hot tip for record fans: Vinyl Cafe at 24b Essex Street is a must visit for vinyl lovers. Like Vinyl Cafe on Facebook,

Get on down to your local record shop, buy yourself some vinyl to spin while the weather goes wild. Talk to people who appreciate quality music. Who knows you may make a new connection…

Record Appreciation – Fee

I love records! I still have a halfway decent collection of records. When I had to replace my stereo a few years back, I made sure it came with a turntable. I’m a purist – like Neil Young I can hear more depth and texture of sound in an LP (Long Player), than I can on a CD or a download. Neil developed PonoMusic to develop modern sound recording formats that delivered quality of sound almost as good as the studio, or the original record. (See Waging Heavy Peace, one of Neil’s engaging autobiographies.)

Other bands and artists such as Iron Maiden and New Zealand’s Shayne P. Carter, have steadfastly resolved to continue releasing albums on vinyl as well as other formats. Shayne P. Carter has been heard to lament the difficulty of reducing sleeve artwork to fit CD cases. I sure as heck can’t read the release date on CDs, and most won’t tell you when the original album was recorded. The discussion about sound continues…

Did you know that you can still buy turntables? I’ve discovered them at The Warehouse, The Listening Post (330 St Asaph Street), the Top Hi-Fi Shop (35 Carlyle St, Sydenham), and Soundline Audio (329 Madras St), Harvey Norman and JB Hi-Fi.

Now to put the record collection in alphabetical order

Record Store Day resources

Vinyl and music at the library

Fee and Donna
Vinyl appreciators

eMagazines for your weekend – RBDigital Magazines

Here are a dozen fresh eMagazines hot off the press from RBDigital Magazines. Perfect for a spot of weekend reading – on your laptop, desktop, phone, tablet …

Cover

  1. British Vogue (includes great interview with Salman Rushdie – apparently he was great buddies with Carrie Fisher)
  2. Vanity Fair
  3. New Zealand Listener
  4. Woman’s Day
  5. Hello!
  6. Grazia
  7. Nadia
  8. All about history
  9. All about space
  10. The Economist [U.S. edition]
  11. Home
  12. F1 Racing

Podcast – Race and disability

Speak Up Kōrerotia logoChristchurch City Libraries blog hosts a series of regular podcasts from New Zealand’s only specialist human rights radio show Speak up – Kōrerotia. This show is created by Sally Carlton.

Race and ethnicity, and disability, are among the most common grounds for discrimination – so what happens when someone identifies as both a racial or ethnic minority and as having a disability?

Part I:’Ableism’; strength-based and cultural conceptualisations of disability; discrimination complaints data
Part II: Systemic discrimination; inquiry into NZ state abuse; migration-related disability discrimination in Australia; prison musters
Part III: Existing supports; importance of culturally-appropriate services; aspirations for the future

Guests: Paul Gibson (former Disability Commissioner at the Human Rights Commission), Jane Flanagan (Senior Research and Policy Advisor, National Ethnic Disability Alliance (NEDA), Australia), Lepou Suia Tuulua (Disability Information Advice and Support Team, Vaka Tautua)

Transcript of audio file

Find out more in our collection

Cover of Parenting an adult with disabilities or special needs Cover of Listening to the experts Cover of Waggy tails and wheelchairs Cover of Racism and Ethnicity by Paul SpoonleyCover of Life is for living Cover of Tangata o le moana: New Zealand and the people of the Pacific Cover of Hikoi  Cover of Old Asian, New Asian Cover of Scapegoat: How We Are Failing Disabled People Cover of Settler and migrant peoples of New Zealand

More about Speak up – Kōrerotia

The show is also available on the following platforms:

Big Library Read: Flat Broke with Two Goats

When life gets your goat, use your library card. Jennifer McGaha’s debut memoir, Flat Broke with Two Goats, is the Big Library Read, the world’s largest digital book club. From 2 to 16 April, Christchurch City Library users can borrow the eBook or eAudiobook with no wait lists or holds.

Readers can take part in the two-week program by visiting Christchurch City Libraries OverDrive or by downloading the Libby app. Big Library Read is facilitated by OverDrive, the leading platform for eBooks and eAudiobooks from the library. Use #BigLibraryRead on social media for a chance to win a Kobo Aura ONE from OverDrive.

Flat Broke with Two Goats – Jennifer McGaha never expected to own a goat named Merle. Or to be setting Merle up on dates and naming his doeling Merlene. She didn’t expect to be buying organic yogurt for her chickens. She never thought she would be pulling camouflage carpet off her ceiling or rescuing opossums from her barn and calling it “date night.” Most importantly, Jennifer never thought she would only have $4.57 in her bank account.

When Jennifer discovered that she and her husband owed back taxes—a lot of back taxes—her world changed. Now desperate to save money, they foreclosed on their beloved suburban home and moved their family to a one-hundred-year-old cabin in a North Carolina holler. Soon enough, Jennifer’s life began to more closely resemble her Appalachian ancestors than her upper-middle-class upbringing. But what started as a last-ditch effort to settle debts became a journey that revealed both the joys and challenges of living close to the land.

Told with bold wit, unflinching honesty, and a firm foot in the traditions of Appalachia, Flat Broke with Two Goats blends stories of homesteading with the journey of two people rediscovering the true meaning of home.