Learn a language with Rosetta Stone

We are pleased to introduce our latest eResource Rosetta Stone Library Solution, an online language learning tool. Whether you are looking to lean a brand new language, or brush up on a language for an overseas trip, Rosetta Stone Library Solution is the perfect solution.

Rosetta Stone Library Solution is an interactive language learning resource that uses proven immersion method. This eResource includes 30 languages to meet a range of cultural interests. Learning is structured around core lessons to build reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills and also includes focused activities to refine grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and more. Languages include:

  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • Spanish
  • French
  • Korean
  • Hindi
  • Polish

Read the full list of available languages

It takes the average learner 50 hours to complete a chosen language with the Rosetta Stone Library Solution. If you set aside five 30-minute sessions a week, the average learner would complete their learning in 20 weeks. There is a great mobile app for those wanting to learn on the go.

eResources

See more of our language eResources.

Ukulele lowdown with Lynda

lynda.com logoIs there anything that Lynda can’t do? She is one talented lady. She already starting teaching me how to take better photographs, and do some computer coding.  So for New Zealand Music Month I thought I would find out what hidden musical talents Lynda.com had, and oh boy is there anything she can’t do! She can play and teach:

  • Guitar (Rock, blues, acoustic)
  • Electric Bass
  • Ukulele
  • Banjo
  • Mandolin
  • Drums
  • Piano

Although I have always fancied myself as playing electric bass (like Kim Gordon, or Kim Deal), I actually have a ukulele so I that is what I am learning today. I have convinced my darling daughters to learn with me but I think that is because they want to be like Grace VanderWaal.

So we get started and our teacher knows how to play, they refer to some notes which I quickly found right under the video. Then we were away strumming. Our rendition of When the saints go marching in wasn’t quite as musical sounding as the teacher, but with a bit of practice I think we could start our own ukulele trio.

For more help learning to play the ukulele:

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There are NZ Music Month performances with ukuleles, including a workshop for beginners.

New eResource – The BWB Collections

Bridget Williams Books (BWB) have a series of online collections that are now available at Christchurch City Libraries. This is a collection of high-quality New Zealand non-fiction books which make it an excellent starting place for any research into New Zealand hot topics. We already have the Treaty Collection, which is an excellent start for all Treaty of Waitangi research but now have four more brilliant BWB collections to peruse.

The BWB Texts Collection

BWB Texts are short books on big subjects: succinct narratives from great New Zealand writers spanning:

  • history,
  • memoir,
  • contemporary issues,
  • science
  • and more.

The best thing about the collection is the size, short reads that you can dip into or read the whole thing.

The Critical Issues Collection

The Critical Issues Collection provides full access to over 40 key books addressing the big issues facing New Zealand today:

  • housing,
  • inequality,
  • climate change,
  • child poverty,
  • the environment,
  • migration,
  • financial crisis,
  • and more.

The New Zealand History Collection

The New Zealand History Collection provides complete online access to a major, authoritative resource – over thirty years of award-winning history and biography publishing from Bridget Williams Books.

The New Zealand Sign Language Collection

The New Zealand Sign Language Collection has reference material alongside accounts of Deaf experience.

A great place to start learning about New Zealand’s third official language.

The Treaty of Waitangi Collection

A collection of searchable electronic reference books on the Treaty of Waitangi from leading thinkers on this foundational document.

New magazine and eMagazine titles at your library

Here are some of the new magazines and eMagazines at Christchurch City Libraries:

Interweave Crochet Minecraft World Magazine

Paleo

Each bimonthly issue of Paleo is packed with the latest research, exercise and nutrition, interviews, inspirational stories, recipes, reviews, info to raise Paleo kids and much more!

25 Beautiful Homes

25 Beautiful Homes showcases the best of British interiors every month. Full of homes that intrigue, delight and inspire, the magazine showcases every interior design style, from contemporary to country and high-end to high street.

Interweave Crochet

Interweave Crochet magazine is the place to learn how to crochet or discover a new crochet technique or tip, be inspired, and shop for crochet magazines, books, videos and and patterns.

Minecraft World

Aimed at 7-11 year olds, Minecraft World magazine is an unofficial guide to the Minecraft™ game. Each issue is packed full of news on what’s happening within the online community, tips on achieving various goals, tutorials, puzzles and plenty of expert advice.

What languages do you speak?

There are approximately 6900 languages in the world today. That’s right – six thousand, nine hundred! That’s A LOT of different languages! How many of them can you speak?

World Languages magazines

CoverWe all learn a language when we are born. That’s our ‘mother language’ – we pick it up from our family and friends, and learn it without too much effort. Some New Zealanders speak English as their mother language, some speak te reo Māori or New Zealand Sign Language, and others speak one of those thousands of other languages. To quote that well-known song, Aotearoa New Zealand really is a great big melting pot of cultures!

UNESCO’s International Mother Language Day (21 February 2017) is a chance to celebrate the different languages we all speak, and to encourage people to read, learn, and share ideas in their native language.

CoverHere at Christchurch City Libraries we have heaps of resources you can read in your mother language – books, newspapers, magazines, online resources, you choose! Our World Languages collections have books and magazines in languages from Afrikaans to Vietnamese.

PressReader lets you read newspapers and magazines from Albania to Zimbabwe, and our selection of language eResources can help you study, relax, or learn English or another language.

Check these resources out, and maybe by next year you’ll be able to say you speak one more language than you do now!

My date with Lynda

With my husband out of town with work, I found myself home alone on Valentine’s Day, I decided instead of watching some soppy romance film, I thought I would spend an evening getting to know Lynda.

Valentines

With 5,800 courses and 260,000 tutorials, first glances were impressive. Lynda.com is an online video tutorial website that is available from our collection of eResources.

I logged in and my date with Lynda began. She is amazing. There are many courses to peruse from IT and programming, to graphic design and business skills. Basics like Microsoft Office are here as well. I was mesmerised. The website is easy to use and all the courses indicate whether they are beginner or advanced so you can immediately tell if it is the right course for you.

LyndaI chose two courses – Photography and Web Design. I know a little about both and can say that tutors on the videos were engaging and obviously experts in their field. Each course is broken up into small tutorials so you can learn at your own pace.

I’m looking forward to spending more time with Lynda, and I am going to suggest that my husband goes on a date with Lynda too, (when he is back in town). He was asking me for some tips on Excel.

Treaty of Waitangi – Do you want to know more?

BWB Treaty of WaitangiWe all know the how important Waitangi Day is to New Zealand, but what do you really know about the Treaty of Waitangi?

This is the question I asked myself this year. I decided to investigate further, and Christchurch City Libraries has an excellent eResource The Treaty of Waitangi Collection from Bridget Williams Books. This platform contains some key texts on the Treaty and the Waitangi Tribunal. There a texts of all different sizes so you can –

  • have a quick read,
  • do some in depth research
  • or search all the texts for the key points you are interested in.

The one grey area for me was translation of the Treaty from English into Māori and reading about how this was translated gave me a greater understanding of why controversy still surrounds the Treaty today. I found it fascinating to read descriptions of what actually happened at Waitangi in 1840 during the signing of the Treaty.

If you are studying and need to cite any of the texts, there is a citation tool. You can choose your citation style and it provides the correct citation for you.

Check out this collection as it is something every New Zealander should know more about.

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Find out more

New titles on Access Video

Access Video LogoDo you find that appealing offerings on TV are rather meagre these days? If so, why not check out Access Video?

Access Video is one of our many eResources. It gives you access to thousands of streaming world-class documentaries, award-winning educational films, and helpful instructional videos on every known subject. The videos can be watched as a whole or just in  segments. Some titles even have transcripts so you can read along if your hearing is impaired.

The library has recently added over 100 new titles to this collection. Although most are about some aspect of American life, there are many of interest to those of us Down Under.

They include a group about dance theatre, mainly set in New York, e.g.:

  • David Rousseve, Part 1 and Part 2, which include some of his work and interviews
  • Douglas Dunn & Jim Neu #1, which pokes fun at at America’s obsession with health clubs
  • Jeff McMahon & Brian Webb, a multi-disciplinary work that looks at the issue of intimacy in the age of AIDS
  • Sosua: Make a Better World, which tells the story of Jewish and Dominican teenagers in New York City’s Washington Heights, who together with the legendary theatre director, Liz Swados, put on a musical about the Dominican rescue of 800 Jews from Hitler’s Germany.

There are also many on important social issues, such as

  • Loose Change, which challenges the official record of September 11, 2001
  • Trump: What’s the Deal? which investigates the reality behind this most public of figures
  • Chernobyl’s Café: Chernobyl is emerging as a popular tourist destination, with local industry on the rise
  • My Jihad, a film about the growing number of young Muslims from all over Europe who are leaving their home towns to fight for ISIS
  • Football Hell, where it is alleged that 4,000 workers will die in Qatar to put on the 2022 Football World Cup
  • Allow Me to Die, which follows the stories of two Belgians considering assisted suicide, exploring the moral difficulties behind the most liberal euthanasia laws in the world
  • Abortion: Ancient and Modern, which explores the ethical, legal and religious dimensions of the abortion debate
  • Reflections on Media Ethics, which includes in-depth discussions with renowned filmmakers, journalists and academics, and interviews with Noam Chomsky, Albert Maysles, George Stoney, Amy Goodman, Jon Alpert and Mary Warnock

And for the Shakespeare fans or newbies, there is The Tempest (S1), presenting the Bard’s work as an animated masterpiece.

So instead of shaking your head in dismay at what’s on the box, try out Access Video – all you need to access it is your library card number and PIN/password.

eResource spotlight – Consumer Health Complete

Don’t ask Dr Google…

Many of us have searched frantically on Google to answer our burning health questions. Maybe you have had a diagnosis from your doctor recently and want to find out more. It can be incredibly difficult to take in all the information from your doctor or health professional and equally hard to think of questions you need to ask when put on the spot. As tempting as it is to go home and ask Dr Google, it is important that the information we find is accurate and up to date. While it doesn’t replace your health professional, it is a great tool for increasing your understanding.

We have some excellent health eResources available through our website that you can access from home as well as at any of our libraries. These are authoritative and you can feel confident that you are getting the right information. Consumer Health Complete is one such resource. You can find it by selecting the e-resource tab at the top of our website and then selecting Health and Medicine. You will find other e-resources here you may like to explore too.

consumerhealthcomplete

Consumer Health Complete covers a huge range of subjects on both conventional and alternative medicine, surgical procedures and has a handy medical dictionary. Use the search box to find information on what you are looking for. You can then look at your results in a variety of formats: journals, reference books, encyclopaedias, magazines, medical images, diagrams and videos.

You also have the ability to create an account, should you wish to save your research. It is very user friendly but if you do need some help don’t forget you can contact us for assistance over the phone or you can pop into any one of our libraries.

Lauren
The Library at Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre

eResource Spotlight – Academic Search Premier

I’ve decided to give everyone a little run through of the eResources we have on offer at Christchurch City Libraries to let you know about some of the great databases we have access to.

academicsearch

Academic Search Premier allows access to one of the world’s largest scholarly full text database, covering every area of academic study. Extremely useful for essay writing and university level research. The collection boasts:

  • More than 14,000 abstracted and indexed journals;
  • More than 4,700 full text journals;
  • Over 12,000 peer reviewed, abstracted and indexed journals;
  • More than 4,000 peer reviewed, full-text journals.

You can also save, print and email results. By creating your own account using an email address and password you can also:

  • Save preferences;
  • Organize your research with folders;
  • Create email alerts and/or RSS

Ben
The Library at Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre