Podcast – DANCEability

Speak Up Kōrerotia logoChristchurch City Libraries blog hosts a series of regular podcasts from New Zealand’s only specialist human rights radio show Speak up – Kōrerotia. This show is created by Sally Carlton.

Join Rodney Bell (internationally-renowned wheelchair dancer and founding member of Touch Compass), Lyn Cotton (Founder and Artistic Director of Jolt Dance Company) and Jo Casey (Regional Programmes Coordinator (Christchurch) at StarJam) in a beautiful and uplifting discussion on the benefits of dance and performance for people perceived as having disabilities.

Part I: Why do you do what you do?
Part II: The benefits of dance – health and wellbeing, social, identity
Part III: The benefits of performance for dancers and audience – visibility, confidence, self-worth; performance as a human right
Part IV: What would you like to see happen in NZ in terms of dance and disability?

Transcript – DANCEability

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Podcast – Race and disability

Speak Up Kōrerotia logoChristchurch City Libraries blog hosts a series of regular podcasts from New Zealand’s only specialist human rights radio show Speak up – Kōrerotia. This show is created by Sally Carlton.

Race and ethnicity, and disability, are among the most common grounds for discrimination – so what happens when someone identifies as both a racial or ethnic minority and as having a disability?

Part I:’Ableism’; strength-based and cultural conceptualisations of disability; discrimination complaints data
Part II: Systemic discrimination; inquiry into NZ state abuse; migration-related disability discrimination in Australia; prison musters
Part III: Existing supports; importance of culturally-appropriate services; aspirations for the future

Guests: Paul Gibson (former Disability Commissioner at the Human Rights Commission), Jane Flanagan (Senior Research and Policy Advisor, National Ethnic Disability Alliance (NEDA), Australia), Lepou Suia Tuulua (Disability Information Advice and Support Team, Vaka Tautua)

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Cover of Parenting an adult with disabilities or special needs Cover of Listening to the experts Cover of Waggy tails and wheelchairs Cover of Racism and Ethnicity by Paul SpoonleyCover of Life is for living Cover of Tangata o le moana: New Zealand and the people of the Pacific Cover of Hikoi  Cover of Old Asian, New Asian Cover of Scapegoat: How We Are Failing Disabled People Cover of Settler and migrant peoples of New Zealand

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The show is also available on the following platforms:

Podcast – Disability rights and the NZ Disability Strategy

Speak Up Kōrerotia logoChristchurch City Libraries blog hosts a series of regular podcasts from New Zealand’s only specialist human rights radio show Speak up – Kōrerotia. This show is created by Sally Carlton.

The latest episode deals with Disability rights and the NZ Disability Strategy and covers topics such as:

This show includes an introductory interview with Nicky Wagner, Minister for Disability Issues, followed by discussion with Megan of the New Zealand Office for Disability Issues, Gary and Robbie from the NZDS Reference Group (in Wellington) and Sally and Shane from People First New Zealand (in Christchurch).

Transcript of the audio file

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Cover of A disability history of the United States Cover of Parenting an adult with disabilities or special needs Cover of Listening to the experts Cover of Waggy tails and wheelchairs

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Inclusion Matters

Inclusion matters posterWe all think we know what it means to have different capacities than everyone else to do everyday tasks… but do we really understand?

Ask yourself who you see when you think of somebody who has an impairment, a disability, someone who is differently abled?

Do you see a wheelchair, a crutch, a cane? Somebody who has a carer with them?

Or do you see somebody who looks just like you, who goes about their day just like you?

Nearly a quarter of the adult New Zealand population (21 percent) identifies in some way as disabled and for people over the age of 65 it increases to over half the population (59 percent) according to the Disability Survey for 2013. I don’t know about you but I don’t see all that many wheelchairs, crutches and canes. Most impairments are hidden. We may not notice them in everyday interactions. We need to be aware of the needs of others.

Just because you do not wear glasses and have no cane doesn’t mean you can see. You can be functionally blind but able to see just enough to navigate into and around buildings but unable to read signs and fill out forms or use self-service points. Somebody without a wheelchair or crutches may have muscular weakness which leaves them unable to stand for any length of time and unable to lift and carry luggage, groceries or shop purchases.

What do we do when we see somebody struggling?  Do we assume they are fine struggling on by themselves? Do we ask if they need help?

Better still do we build our buildings and service points with everyone in mind?

You may say we do we bear in mind wheelchair access by having light switches at a lower height and ramps but have they been test driven by someone in a wheelchair before your business opened? Only then will you know if you have thought of all the barriers and are truly barrier free. Do not forget it only takes one link in the chain to break to make all your efforts in vain.

On the 3rd of December it is International Day of Persons with Disabilities. Time to include everyone because inclusion matters. We subtly exclude people when we focus on the impairment and not the ability. How can we support people to continue living their lives fully in society?

Have you ever seen people ignore somebody and talk to the person they came with? Would you like being spoken about as if you where not really there?

You may think you would never ignore somebody in this way but if you do not give consideration to everyone when you plan services, websites and buildings you are in effect ignoring and excluding a large part of the population. With that in mind Christchurch City Libraries strives to serve everyone. Let us know how we can improve and serve you better by contacting us.

Accessibility tips

Check out our page on help in using the library where you can find out about captioned DVDs, large print and talking books as well as our eResources including eBooks where you can change the font size. If you want help with using our library eResources come along to one of our computer drop in sessions.

New technologies especially in the field of communications have come a long way but not everyone has access to them. Mobile phones can help with vision impairments as an installed magnifying glass app can be a great help. Our library computers for public use also have some accessibility tools installed.

I have a tip for searching our library catalogue. Did you know you can search the catalogue for accessible formats?

Click on ‘Search’Search Button

Select ‘Accessible Formats’ from the  ‘All Formats’ dropdown list.

Select ‘Keyword’.

Enter your search word e.g. Lee Child, then click on the magnifying glass magnifying glass icon

Screenshot of catalogue search

Can you recommend any other useful apps or tips to help?

For more library resources about accessibility check out:

United Nations accessibility resources:

Making a splash

Cover of Stroke of luckEach time I go swimming at Dudley Park in Rangiora I pass a t-shirt signed by multiple gold medal winning Paralympic swimmer Sophie Pascoe. Not surprisingly I find this very inspiring. Therefore as soon as I heard she had an autobiography coming out I put myself on the hold list. The book arrived for me last week and it proved to be a fascinating read.

I read quite a few sports autobiographies and sometimes find they don’t go into as much detail in some areas as you might like. This is not the case with Sophie – her book is refreshingly open, honest and full of personality.

Although only 20 years old Sophie –  from Halswell – has crammed a lot into her life. In the first chapter, her father Garry talks candidly and movingly about the horrific lawnmower accident which led to her lower left leg being amputated. Becoming an elite athlete while still at school presented unique challenges and opportunities – including opening a building at her school named in her honour while still a student there. In particular, I found it really interesting to read about the dedication and sacrifices needed to compete at the top level, as well as the will to win and the frustration of coming second. Her hope for the future are also discussed.

Who would like this book? Anyone! Whether you are interested in sport, Cantabrians, biography, those overcoming adversity, interesting personalities or simply curious this is a worthwhile read.

If you are interested in any aspect of swimming have a look at our swimming resources page.

Who inspires you? Have you read any memorable biographies or autobiographies this year?