Science Snippets – Colour Magic

Science Alive is back next week for Term 3 with their Science Snippets sessions in libraries. Excellent Science Alive educators lead children through interactive activities to stimulate their interest in science, and there is something to take home every week! There is a different theme for each session and this coming week from Monday 1 August it’s Colour Magic at Papanui, Lyttelton, Fendalton, Upper Riccarton, and Hornby (it will be Colour Magic at South, Aranui, Shirley, Linwood, and Parklands on the week starting 8 August).

You are sure to learn all about colour and do some fun experiments. Here are some great nonfiction books that we have in the library if you want to learn more about colour:

Here are some stories about colour to read too:

We also have some fantastic eResources with heaps of information about colour. Check these out:

  • Britannica Library Kids – a search for ‘colour’ gives you information about colour, with different levels of information for different ages.
  • World Book Kids – a search for ‘colour’ gives you some basic information about the topic, along with some suggestions for other topics you might like to look at for more information.

For more information about Science Alive’s Science Snippets check out Science Alive on our website.

Remembering Richard Pearse 1877 to 1953

My name is Richard William Pearse and today it will be 63 years since my death. You know me because I was one of the first people in the world to fly a powered aircraft. Some of you even believe that my flight preceded that of the Wright Brothers and you would be right, it did by several months.

Richard Pearse 80 cent stamp
Richard Pearse stamp, 1990. Image used by permission of New Zealand Post.

But many years ago I conceded quite publicly that by my own rigorous standards I hadn’t achieved controlled and sustained flight. It was quite a ride though when I did achieve take off and stayed in the air for over a hundred metres before ‘landing’ atop the large gorse hedge that bordered my property in Waitohi. My collarbone and I fared about as well as my plane did when I hit the hedge and we were both the worse for wear afterwards.

So while I could obviously get my plane in the air I needed to set about solving the problem of aerial navigation. Despite my work, this is where my well funded counterparts in the Northern Hemisphere had the advantage until finally as I wrote in the Evening Star on 10th May 1915;

…as aerial navigation was already an accomplished fact, I decided to give up the struggle, as it was useless to continue against men who had factories at their backs.

But other events would also define my life. In 1910 I became very ill with typhoid and spent three months in bed and a further six months convalescing. It was with particular significance that only a couple of years later Wilbur Wright died from the same illness. I moved to Milton, Otago not long afterwards to farm sheep and took my designs and aircraft with me but the landscape was unsuitable for trial flights. I put my efforts into inventing farm machinery instead.

Richard Pearse Patent Drawing1906
Richard Pearse’s Fantastic Flying Machine, drawing from Richard Pearse’s patent, July 1906 [patent number #21476], Archives New Zealand (CC BY-SA 2.0)
In 1917 I was conscripted into the army and was placed with the Otago Infantry Regiment. I am 40 years old and despite enjoying walking the hills around my home and playing golf and tennis; I am unprepared for the toll army training will take on me. It soon became apparent that the typhoid had left its mark and I was eventually found to be physically unfit for further military service and discharged. I was home by the end of 1918.

By 1921 wool prices were plummeting so I decided it was time to sell up and I relocated to Christchurch. Here I eventually purchased three houses, two of which I rented out and lived off the proceeds so that I could continue my work. I dreamed of a plane in every home, but this was not to be. As time passed and my work continued to reside in relative obscurity; I became unwell and lived out my years at Sunnyside Hospital. I died here on 29th July, 1953.

But in a strange twist of fate my work lives on and is celebrated today. The recognition that eluded me in my lifetime has been heaped upon me in death. My utility plane and my years of research were discovered at my Christchurch home and a dump in Waitohi with thanks largely to my champion George Bolt. A replica of my plane was constructed in the mid 1970s, it toured the country and is now on display at Auckland’s Museum of Transport and Technology. They even tested it in a wind tunnel to see if it would fly. Unsurprisingly, it did.

Richard Pearse's Aeroplane No. 1 replica, MOTAT, Auckland, New Zealand, 5 April 2010 photo by Phillip Capper
Richard Pearse’s Aeroplane No. 1 replica, MOTAT, Auckland, New Zealand, 5 April 2010 photo by Phillip Capper (CC BY 2.0)

More information on Richard Pearse

Akaroa Ladies Hockey Team 1911: Picturing Canterbury

Akaroa Ladies Hockey. 1911.
Akaroa Ladies Hockey 1911. File Reference: Ladies_Hockey._1911.jpg CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 NZ.

Both men’s & women’s hockey has a long tradition in Canterbury; there were seven Canterbury men in the NZ Men’s Hockey Team that won gold at the Montreal Olympics in July 1976.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Quick questions with Dr Selina Tusitala Marsh

We are asking four quick questions of writers and thinkers coming to the WORD Christchurch Writers and Readers Festival on from 24 to 28 August.  First up, it’s Dr Selina Tusitala Marsh, award-winning Auckland-based Pacific poet and scholar.  She recently performed for the Queen as the 2016 Commonwealth Poet.

Service at Westminster Abbey in the presence of HM The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh, together with TRH The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Henry of Wales and HRH Prince Andrew.
Service at Westminster Abbey in the presence of HM The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh, together with TRH The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Henry of Wales and HRH Prince Andrew.  Image supplied.

What are you looking forward to doing in Christchurch?

I look forward to jogging around the city to see resilience in action and get my feet earthed long the Avon River! Also, catching up with Festival participants, soaking up the creative energies of others, writing in my hotel room, enjoying the air.

What do you think about libraries?

I love libraries (and librarians – especially school ones because they are my key contact people when I visit schools to perform and run workshops) and I especially love the relatively recent development of turning them into active, brimming social spaces (we’ve got a cafe in the Auckland City library) with noisy and quiet areas!

CoverWhat would be your “desert island book”?

No island is a desert, there were always people there before us! Plus, I read buffet-style with commonly 5 on the go, so, at the moment my 5 must have’s are Eckhart Tolle’s Power of Now, Anne Rice’s The Witching Hour, Austin Kleon’s Black Out Writing journal, the latest Chimurenga journal (picked up in Cape Town – amaaazing!) and Cherie Barford’s most excellent poetry collection, Entangled Islands.

Share a surprising fact about yourself.

I got caught in an arm bar during this morning’s MMA sparring session and am filled with thoughts of revenge!

Dr Selina Tusitala Marsh appears at WORD in the following events:
Power of Poetry, Fri 26 Aug, 5pm
Hear My Voice, Sat 27 Aug, 5.30pm
Spirit House/Unity, Sun 28 Aug, 2pm

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A glut of literary cookbooks

Cover of Dinner with Mr DarcyAs so often happens with me, I recently spotted a single title that lead me down a library collection rabbit hole that I’ve only just scrambled out of.

The book in question was Dinner With Mr Darcy: Recipes Inspired by the Novels and Letters of Jane Austen. My interest was piqued. I had a sudden appetite to know – what other literature could I consume, literally?

I seemed to recall my sister attending a Cover of A feast of Ice & FireGame of Thrones themed party in recent years that featured some Westerosi cuisine along the lines of Sansa Stark’s beloved lemon cakes. And sure enough, I found the very book, A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Companion Cookbook.

And well, from there it was cookbooks all the way down. And being that it’s winter and nobody really wants to go out much, I wonder if putting on a bit of a shindig with themed eating might not be the way to go? If that tickles your gastronomic fancy, then have I got the reading list for you!

First off, Dinner with Mr Darcy is not the only option for Austen fans as Cooking With Jane Austen covers similar Regency fare. Complete with food-related quotes from Austen’s work and with over 200 recipes there’s sure to be something to tempt even the most proud and prejudicial of guests.

Cover of Green eggs and ham cookbookFor kids (or the ravenous child within) there are a number of titles to choose including those inspired by childhood classics such as The Winnie-the-Pooh Cookbook and Green Eggs and Ham Cookbook. Not to mention two volumes of Roald Dahl’s Revolting Recipes.

Or if you know a child who’d like fairytale-inspired food then you could try Fairy Tale Feasts: A Literacy CookbookCook Me A Story: A Treasury of Stories and Recipes Inspired by Classic Fairy Tales or Chinese Fairy Tale Feasts: A Literary Cookbook. Fans of Brian Jacques long-running children’s series will no doubt be interested in The Redwall Cookbook.

Cover of Fifty shades of chickenThose looking for something a little more adult might like Fifty Shades of Chicken: A Parody in A Cookbook. I only hope is that none of the shades is “pink”. I also suspect the name of the author “F L Fowler” is a nomme de (poultry) plume.

Also for the grownups are the thirst-quenching literary themed cocktail recipes of Tequila Mockingbird, and True Blood Drinks & Bites.

Cover of The geeky chef cookbookMore pop culture than literary? Geeks of several flavours can explore their fandom through food with The Official DC Super Hero CookbookThe Geeky Chef Cookbook (covers Harry Potter, Star Trek, World of Warcraft, Dr Who and more), and The Unofficial Harry Potter cookbook.

For those with more refined palates, Mrs Patmore’s kitchen secrets are revealed in The Unofficial Downton Abbey cookbook.

Cover of VoraciousIt’s comforting to know I’m not the only person to ever ask the “what books could I eat?” question either, in fact a book by a former pastry chef turned butcher asks just this…and what’s more provides some recipes in answer which can be found in Voracious: A Hungry Reader Cooks Her Way Through Great Books.

There’s also a photographic twist on the same idea in Fictitious Dishes: An Album of Literature’s Most Memorable Meals which includes culinary creations from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Oliver Twist, and To Kill a Mockingbird among others.

Meanwhile, there are certain dishes or kinds of food that are, in my mind, inseparable from the fictional characters for whom they were favourites. I often think of the Famous Five when I enjoy a ginger beer, and should I ever find myself in possession of a rock cake I’m sure I’ll make the same association.

What food item from literature would you like to try the recipe for? Bags not Anne of Green Gables’ liniment* cake!

*Apparently very easily mistaken for vanilla extract when you’ve got a cold.

Podcast – Human Rights and the Olympics

Speak Up Kōrerotia logoChristchurch City Libraries blog hosts a series of regular podcasts from New Zealand’s only specialist human rights radio show Speak up – Kōrerotia.

With the Rio Olympics due to start next month, this episode discusses human rights in the sporting context and touches on subjects such as –

  • The portrayal of sportswomen in the media
  • Paralympics and breaking down barriers of perceptions of able-bodied and disabled people
  • Human rights abuses perpetrated in the lead-up to and during Olympic Games
  • Steps taken by the International Olympic Committee to redress these abuses
  • The world of elite gymnastics

The panel for this show includes Roslyn Kerr from Lincoln University, whose research looks at the world of elite gymnastics, Ashley Abbott from the New Zealand Olympic Committee, and Barbara Kendall, five-time Olympian and member of the International Olympic Committee. This discussion is preceded by an interview with William Stedman, New Zealand’s youngest Paralympian for Rio 2016.

 

Transcript of the audio file

Find out more in our collection

Cover of The 100 greatest Olympians and Paralympians Cover of A guide to the world anti-doping code Cover of Built to win Cover of Chalked up

More about Speak up – Kōrerotia

The show is also available on the following platforms:

Te Rerenga Kōrero – Koia kei a koe

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori – The Māori Language Commission publish weekly Māori phrases that can be used to support or cheer someone on.

Koia kei [a koe]/[a Sonny/Nehe/Māmā]!
You’re great. You/Sonny/Nehe/Mum really nailed it!

akina te reo rugby

Podcast – Exposing human rights through (citizen) media

Speak Up Kōrerotia logoChristchurch City Libraries blog hosts a series of regular podcasts from New Zealand’s only specialist human rights radio show Speak up – Kōrerotia.

Exposing human rights through (citizen) media discusses topics as wide-ranging as satellite technology, the Arab Spring and the struggle for independence in West Papua.

Guests: Steven Livingston (The George Washington University, The Brookings Institution and Carr Center for Human Rights Policy), David Robie (Pacific Media Centre at Auckland University of Technology) and undercover journalist Jaya Mangalam Gibson (Quad Cowork etc)

 

Transcript of audio file

Find out more in our collection

Cover of Don't spoil my beautiful face Cover of The new Arabs Cover of Kill the messenger

More about Speak up – Kōrerotia

The show is also available on the following platforms:

The “Monty Tour” 1947: Picturing Canterbury

The “Monty Tour”, 1947.
Arthur Cyril Pearce worked for the Public Service Garage and drove dignitaries. He took this photo of one of his famous passengers Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein. The “Monty Tour” went from 22-07-1947 to 11-08-1947 and went from Christchurch to Greymouth, Westport, Granity and back to Greymouth and then Christchurch. Date: 1947. Original Filename Pearce_family_photos_46.jpg Entry in the 2013 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt. CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 NZ

 

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Trump vs Clinton

It’s on. Man vs woman. Republican vs Democrat. You may well be fed up with the whole thing by now but if not, we have plenty of reading material on the presidential hopefuls, including Trump’s The Art of the Deal.

Tony Schwartz, the ghostwriter of this immensely popular “memoir” of the real estate tycoon gave an astonishing interview with The New Yorker this week in which he expressed regret at having written it.

Cover of The art of the deal“I feel a deep sense of remorse that I contributed to presenting Trump in a way that brought him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is.” He went on, “I genuinely believe that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes there is an excellent possibility it will lead to the end of civilization.”

Whoa.

But The Art of the Deal is by no means the only book about, or purportedly by, Trump in our collection.

Cover of Never enough Cover of Crippled America Cover of Trump never give up Cover of Trump University Real Estate 101

Find more titles about Donald J. Trump

But by sheer volume Hillary Rodham Clinton is in the lead…

Cover of H R C Cover of Hard choices Cover of Living history Cover of A woman in charge Cover of Her way Cover of Leadership secrets of Hillary Clinton Cover of The secretary Cover of Hillary

Find more titles about Hillary Rodham Clinton