Photo Hunt October: Strumming on the Roof tops of New Regent Street, 1966

Strumming on the roof..
Highly Commended entry in the Christchurch City Libraries 2008 Photo Hunt. HWC08-ANZC-011 CC-BY-NC-ND-3.0 NZ.

Christchurch City Libraries has been running an annual Photo Hunt in conjunction with the city’s Heritage Week since 2008.  The 2016 Photo Hunt is running again from 1 – 31 October. During the month of October we will be posting a series of images from earlier Photo Hunts.

Enter the 2016 hunt online or at your local library.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch & Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Happy birthday to you

“Happy Birthday!” is a phrase you might hear a wee bit more often today – 30th September is the day that most New Zealanders celebrate their birthday. According to Statistics NZ, the birthdays of about 14,200 people in New Zealand fall on this day – even if your birthday doesn’t fall on this day you can see where your birthday is ranked.

Since many of us have birthdays around this time of year – the 10 most common birthdays all appear in the 10-day period from 22 September to 1 October – it’s appropriate to tell you  how Christchurch City Libraries can help make a birthday a special one.

Happy birthday

Looking for some inspiration? Libraries offer a great range of resources to make the birthday of a loved one special. On offer is a wonderful range of books on birthday related topics such as party games, card making, gift ideas/projects and birthday cake decorating.

An eBook reader makes a fantastic gift for any occasion. Having one opens up access to a massive collection of eBooks that are free to download from the library (however be aware that the Kindle is not compatible with library eBook providers). The library also offers support in getting started with your eBook reader. An iPad or tablet can take this to a new level – these allow you to download not just eBooks but also services such as PressReader (newspapers and magazines) and eAudiobooks from the library.

Giving someone a framed family tree chart can make a superb gift – Central Library Manchester is where you will find the Family History Centre and staff are available to help you research ancestors.

Another unique gift idea that seems to have taken hold in recent years involves printing the front page of The Press newspaper on the day the said person was born. The page can then be enlarged and laminated and given to the person on the big day. The Press newspaper archive is located at Central Library Manchester.

The Gig Guide: October 2016

Planning on attending a concert, show, or gig in Christchurch? Then why not take a look at what we’ve got of that artist’s back catalogue?

Kids

Comedy

What gigs are you looking forward to in the near future? Anything we’ve missed? Do let us know in the comments.

Podcast – Women in the workplace

Speak Up Kōrerotia logoChristchurch City Libraries blog hosts a series of regular podcasts from New Zealand’s only specialist human rights radio show Speak up – Kōrerotia. This show is created by Sally Carlton.

This episode discusses issues around gender equality in the workplace such as –

  • Women’s Empowerment Principles
  • Pay inequity
  • Ethnicity and disability in the workplace
  • Representation of women on boards and in senior management
  • Gender quotas
  • Workplace policies for family violence and parental leave

The panel for this show includes host Sally Carlton, Dr Jackie Blue, Equal Employment Opportunities Commissioner at the NZ Human Rights Commission, Angela McLeod of UN Women Aotearoa and Erin Ebborn of Ebborn Law.

Transcript of the audio file

Find out more in our collection

Cover of Because we're worth it Cover of Lean in Cover of Sex and the office Cover of Raising the bar

More about Speak up – Kōrerotia

The show is also available on the following platforms:

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

Want to instantly feel better about being a teen? Be thankful you’re not peculiar…

miss-peregrines-home-for-peculiar-childrenMiss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs is a book was so weirdly compelling it had me from the moment I saw the strange image on the cover – it had to be different from your average vampire romance.

A bestselling story for young adults that appeals to a wide audience, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is based on a fantastical collection of sepia photographs, of children with strange abilities.

Following clues left from his Grandfather’s violent death, Jake becomes linked with the fate of the original and colourful characters that fill a slip of time, hidden on an island. The reader becomes drawn in too, unable to stop reading late into the night. That’s always the sign of a great book.

Leaving room for a couple of sequels in the series, which is up to book 3: The Library of Souls, this first story begins an epic journey of self-discovery and adventure for Jacob and his new friends as they try to escape those who would expose them.

Are ghosts a photograph of time? What is really behind the spooky photographs that are sprinkled through the pages? The really scary thing about this book is that images in the antique pictures seem REAL.

The very exciting news is that Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is making the transition to the big screen! It will be in cinemas this week, with a star studded lineup which includes Dame Judi Dench as Miss Avocet.

Before you see it, I urge you to read the book.

If anyone can do this book justice, Tim Burton can? I have high hopes…

Junior Robotics at the Learning Centre at Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre

The Learning Centre at Te Hāpua:  Halswell Centre recently staged the first ever junior computer science competition in Canterbury, called The Buzz Off. Students from year 1 to 3 came from a number of schools to compete in Beebot robot challenges.

beebot-city

This event was organised with the support from Professor Tim Bell, University of Canterbury – Computer Science guru. MTA (Modern Teaching Aids) donated a first prize of $300 to a well deserving Ladbrookes school. You would have thought we had given them a million dollars by the looks on their faces!

Two ladies from Google Australia kindly made the trip to support this venture and donated gifts for all children who participated.

The great thing about this competition was that it was run by students for students. St Margaret’s, Casebrook, St Peter’s and Kaiapoi North student helpers supported, guided and celebrated the younger students learning.

For many of the teacher/adult helpers this was their first visit to the Te Hāpua Halswell Library. They expressed lots of enthusiasm and many expressions of “This library is fabulous and we will definitely be back”.

You can experience BeeBots at the Fun Palaces at Central Library Peterborough and see more robotics related classes.

In our Learning Centre, students experience eLearning programmes aligned with the New Zealand Curriculum document. These programmes provide learning in a technology-rich environment and the teaching within these programmes keep abreast with the latest teaching philosophies and strategies.

If you are interested in working with us to tailor an existing programme or work alongside us  please contact us Tel: 941 5140 or  Learningcentre@ccc.govt.nz

Historical Fiction of the Masses

Historical fiction is beaut and I read LOADS of it!

I find that it’s an opportunity for talented writers to explore a tiny part of history and expand on it in a way that keeps within the spirit of the times. With the added bonus of hindsight, they might get into some areas that perhaps weren’t fully described by contemporary historians in factual writings.

There’s another side to historical fiction too, and this is the tendency to lean towards topics & settings centred on ladies holding court in the drawing room or the Upstairs-Downstairs type narrative full of posh English aristocrats, much like the recently popular Downton Abbey or Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall which has had the tele treatment.

There’s nothing wrong with these stories, some of them are written beautifully and they sure make good TV fodder, but my concern is that we may be boxing the term “historical fiction” into these aristocratic themes and subsequently some other great works about the “historical common people” are not reaching audiences that would love them. So let’s get into the gritty side of what I like to call (for lack of a better term) Historical Fiction of the Masses.

CoverA fine example of Historical Fiction of the Masses (and I may be showing by Tasmanian roots here) is one of my favourite books of all time – Gould’s Book of Fish – a Novel in Twelve Fish by Richard Flanagan. He’s a Tasmanian author who most recently won the Man Booker Prize for his work (also historical fiction) Narrow Road to the Deep North.

In Gould’s Book of Fish he delves deeply into the corruption, lunacy and brutality of the penal system of transportation to Van Diemen’s Land in the 17th/18th centuries. This is a history not often told in its full brutal reality by history’s keepers, until quite recently when shame around the perceived “convict stain” was turned around and many people began speaking with pride of their convicted and transported ancestors.

CoverThere’s another very accomplished and award winning Tasmanian author who writes good “Historical Fiction of the Masses” – Rohan Wilson. His two titles – The Roving Party and To Name Those Lost are full of grit and reality and are based on real points of history, and the characters based on real people.

And there’s other great international titles in this vein too, The Revenant by Michael Punke is a survivalist story set in the 19th century Rocky Mountains frontier and has recently achieved a lot of attention with Leonardo Dicaprio claiming his first Oscar for his role as the main character.

CoverThe North Water by Ian McGuire dealing with life on a whaling ship in the North Sea & the ship’s morally corrupt crew was long-listed for this year’s Man Booker Prize

There’s a huge depth of writing in this style and a new title piqued my interest after I heard an interview with the author Eowyn Ivey on Radio New Zealand.

CoverHer book is titled To the Bright Edge of the World and during her interview she expressed her admiration for minimalist writers such as Hemingway and Cormac McCarthy. She even said that one of her best-loved books was Gould’s Book of Fish by Flanagan – how could you resist!? Her book is written as diary entries and other correspondence amongst a group travelling through the wilds of frozen Alaska, their families & their descendants. It’s brutal, realistic and believable with strong engaging characters, a weight of mysticism and a deep plot – all the elements for a fine example of Historical Fiction of the Masses!

Go get some titles like these and get reading! Ma Te Wa.

Te Rerenga Kōrero – Eke panuku!

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori – The Māori Language Commission publish weekly Māori phrases that can be used to support or cheer someone on.

Eke panuku!
Win! Made it!

akina te reo rugby

The Winner of the Church Tour 2016 tickets

…is Hugh Joughin.

Congratulations Hugh, and thanks to everyone who entered our competition for a double pass to the first of two Christchurch shows next week.

We asked you to name your favourite song by one of the artists performing in The Church Tour 2016 and there were some clear favourites.

Shona vs Sharon

Shona Laing’s Glad I’m not a Kennedy got four times the votes of anything else, and though Kiwi classic Maxine, by Sharon O’Neill made an attempt it was nowhere near the popularity of Laing’s 1986 hit from the album, South.

Positive Ageing Expo – Monday 26 September

2016 is the 10th Positive Ageing Expo. This annual event marks the International Day of Older Persons. It’s on Monday 26 September from 9.30am to 2.30pm at Papanui High School.

older-user

Come along for information and advice on:

  • Health and Wellbeing
  • Recreation
  • Staying Safe
  • Nutrition
  • Social Opportunities
  • Transport Options
  • Potting a Plant by Rachel Vogan

A caterpillar bus will take people from the Sawyers Arms Road gates to the gymnasium where the exhibits. Parking for cars is available at the rear of the school. Over 120 exhibitors are offering services and information for older adults and their families.

There will be entertainment throughout the day. Food and beverages available to purchase, and there will also some free light refreshments.

older-ereader-user