Linwood Games – this Sunday 11 December

Head along to the Linwood Games this Sunday!

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The Games are on at Linwood Park, Linwood Avenue this Sunday 11 December, from noon to 3pm. There will be skate tricks and tips, scoot, rollerblade, bounce, jump on a crazy bike, shoot some hoops with Mai FM, play tag, face painting and much more! Free Hellers sausage sizzle.

FREE! (for more info, phone 941 8999)

Want more awesome local Linwood stuff? Check out this fab Linwood Games brochure.

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There is info on the Linwood Games, but also lots more. It has a great selection of places to go and things to do in Linwood, including community events, activity centres, afterschool and holiday programmes, sports clubs – as well as local basketball hoops, playgrounds, paddling pool, skate parks and tennis courts.
And our Linwood Library at Eastgate is on the list too!

Knit ME! Knit ME!

Cover of Knitted Animal CoziesOne of the best things about being a librarian has got to be unpacking the boxes of new books. It’s like a little bit of Christmas every week!

As soon as I pulled Knitted Animal Cozies out of the box, I just knew this was my latest favourite craft book. The animals are so desperately cute and adorable, I just wanted to knit them right away. I found myself wanting to take up drinking coffee just so that I could knit myself a woolly Sheep Cafetière Hug. Or even golf, because who wouldn’t want cute, fluffy, puppy cozies for their golf-clubs?

Once I recovered from the cuteness overload, I realised it’s written by Fiona Goble, who just so happens to have written several other crafty favourites of mine. I actually like Fleecie Dolls so much I bought my own copy! And once I’ve knitted all the cozies I need in my life (maybe I’ll skip the Tortoise Stool Cozy) I rather think I’d like a Knitivity.

Cover of KnitivitySince most of the cozy projects are knitted in chunky or aran weight wool, or are pretty small, they should be quick to make — unlike Grandpa’s socks which I’m still working on 10 months later (the end is in sight, though, I’m 7 inches down sock number two)!! And if you’re new to knitting, the book has great, clear instructions on how to knit, including how to do the various stitches in the patterns.

Go on, you know you want some knitted animal cozies too!

 

Recent necrology, November 2016

Some well-known people who have died recently

  • Mose Allison, 1927-2016
    American jazz and blues pianist, singer, and songwriter
  • Fidel Castro, 1926-2016
    Cuban revolutionary turned dictator
  • Leonard Cohen, 1934-2016
    Canadian singer, songwriter, poet and novelist

Cover of My LifeCover of Leonard Cohen on Leonard CohenCover of The Modfather

Cover of Self-PortraitCover of New Cura RomanaCover of Fawlty Towers Volume 2

Te Rerenga Kōrero – Tino kino te pai!

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori – The Māori Language Commission publish weekly Māori phrases that can be used to support or cheer someone on.

Tino kino te pai!
Quite the best!

akina te reo rugby

Images of Christmas: Then and Now

A picture is worth a thousand words and there are few things more mesmerising than that tradition of perusing old photograph albums.

Car Float and Rollerskates, c. 1970
Christmas Parade: Car Float and Rollerskates, c. 1970 File Reference CCL Img ARCH812-49

As Hal Boyle (1971) put it:

Memory is more than a dustbin of time, stuffed with yesterday’s trash. Rather, memory is a glorious grab at the past from which one can at leisure pluck bittersweet experiences of times gone by and relive them.

Christchurch City Libraries has a wealth of digitised photography, and who doesn’t like a good trip down memory lane?

New Zealanders have been celebrating Christmas in style and with flair for many moons, so in the spirit of the season, here are some highlights from our Christmas Images collection:

Father Christmas delights Cantabrians whether arriving in his old fashioned automobile or in his blow up dinghy:

Father Christmas visits Heathcote Valley School
Father Christmas visits Heathcote Valley School. Gimblett-0011.
Santa arrives on New Brighton beach, 12/12/015.
Santa arrives on New Brighton beach, 12/12/015. 2015-12-12-IMG_1509.

 

The fashion phenomenon of the onesie goes way back:

Red Riding Hood Wolf: Hay's Ltd Christmas Pageant, c. 1950
Red Riding Hood Wolf: Hay’s Ltd Christmas Pageant, c. 1950. CCL-Arch978-1-019.

 

They dressed up for the occasion:

Christmas Trees at Hay's Christmas Parade, c. 1970.
Christmas Trees at Hay’s Christmas Parade, c. 1970. CCL Img ARCH812-68.
New Brighton Santa Parade. 12/12/2015.
New Brighton Santa Parade. 12/12/2015. File reference: 2015-12-12-IMG_1553.

The tradition of the Christmas Parade in Christchurch began in the 1930’s with T.J Armstrong & Co. Then around 1947, the Christchurch Santa Parade was launched by retailer James Hay. Hay’s Christmas Parade was immensely popular with children and families:

Father Christmas on T.J Armstrong & Co's Christmas Float
Father Christmas on T.J Armstrong & Co’s Christmas Float, c. 1930. CCL PhotoCD 16, IMG0054.
Santa Float at Hay's Christmas Parade, 1970's. CCL Img ARCH812-27.
Santa Float at Hay’s Christmas Parade, 1970’s. CCL Img ARCH812-27.

Today, the custom continues:

Where to go to find more Christmas Images?

  • Christchurch City Libraries’ Christmas Images page.
  • Kete Christchurch have collections of the New Brighton Christmas Parade and more.
  • DigitalNZ have compiled an assortment of images from Santa Parades around the country.
A Christmas parade passes along Colombo Street, Christchurch c. 1930. CCL PhotoCD 17, IMG0001.
A Christmas parade passes along Colombo Street, Christchurch
c. 1930. CCL PhotoCD 17, IMG0001.

eResource spotlight – Consumer Health Complete

Don’t ask Dr Google…

Many of us have searched frantically on Google to answer our burning health questions. Maybe you have had a diagnosis from your doctor recently and want to find out more. It can be incredibly difficult to take in all the information from your doctor or health professional and equally hard to think of questions you need to ask when put on the spot. As tempting as it is to go home and ask Dr Google, it is important that the information we find is accurate and up to date. While it doesn’t replace your health professional, it is a great tool for increasing your understanding.

We have some excellent health eResources available through our website that you can access from home as well as at any of our libraries. These are authoritative and you can feel confident that you are getting the right information. Consumer Health Complete is one such resource. You can find it by selecting the e-resource tab at the top of our website and then selecting Health and Medicine. You will find other e-resources here you may like to explore too.

consumerhealthcomplete

Consumer Health Complete covers a huge range of subjects on both conventional and alternative medicine, surgical procedures and has a handy medical dictionary. Use the search box to find information on what you are looking for. You can then look at your results in a variety of formats: journals, reference books, encyclopaedias, magazines, medical images, diagrams and videos.

You also have the ability to create an account, should you wish to save your research. It is very user friendly but if you do need some help don’t forget you can contact us for assistance over the phone or you can pop into any one of our libraries.

Ben
The Library at Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre

I do not like Fantasy, I do not like it Anywhere

But I’m reading Fantasy novels and worse (despite my carefully nurtured prejudiced convictions) I’m really getting into some of it. How the heck did that happen? I mean, Lord of the Rings was a once read and never watched. I gave it a go though and never got round to reading Harry Potter and don’t feel the need.

Enough! You get the drift I am not a fan, so how is it that the cover of Ben Aaronovitch‘s fantasy novel Rivers of London was constantly appearing either at the returns desk or on the shelves at different libraries and became a siren call? Great cover obviously, and the blurb on the back suggested humour and magic, contemporary and a mystery. So I gave in, read it and loved it.

Here’s a taster of the start. PC Peter Grant a probationary constable, looking likely for a placement in the Case Progression Unit (shuffling paper, not real copper work) is guarding a murder scene on a cold London night. His fellow PC Lesley – supposedly guarding the other side of the square – has gone for coffees when a strange looking geezer sidles up to Peter whispering that he knows whodunnit. Something about him makes Peter pretty sure he’s a ghost and when he vanishes at the sight of Lesley with the coffees he knows he’s onto it.

The next night he’s back in his own time, to see if there’s any further signs of spooks. No ghost but he does meet his future boss, Inspector Nightingale the last Wizard in England. Don’t be put off by the wizard bit, Aaronovitch makes the magic stuff seem perfectly normal and the upper Echelons of the Force use Nightingale and Peter when necessary but no-one’s allowed to use the M…. word. Rivers is written with lovely satirical wit and great imagination. Highly recommended.

shades of greyAgain with humour, and a suitably bizarre idea of a future, post apocalyptic world is Jasper Fforde‘s Shades of Grey. We of the here and now are “those who went before” and the leadership’s cunning plans including “great leaps backward” leaves this colourtocracy carless except for a Model A, severely short of spoons and with acronyms forbidden.

But there’s more rules of course and your status is defined by being able to see the higher end of a particular colour spectrum, purple denotes a higher social standing. Our hero Eddie Russett (sees red) has been banished to High Saffron due to a variety of misdemeanours. Depending on the results of his upcoming colour test though, he is destined to marry Violet.

But then he meets Jane, a Grey and with her smarts and attitude. It dawns on him that all is not as well as he thinks in a world he considers just and fair and has never questioned. A highly entertaining read. Ever since I read this I’ve been checking to see where the very slow to follow up Mr Fforde is with the sequel. He’s left a whole lot of us waiting impatiently for a good follow up to an original that’s got a nice tight plot, is cleverly satirical and laugh out loud. I may even read it again. In fact I know I will.

The Gig Guide: December 2016

Planning on attending a concert, show, or gig in Christchurch? Then why not take a look at what we’ve got of that artist’s back catalogue?

Comedy

Dance

  • St Petersburg Ballet – Swan Lake 29-31 December

Kids

Music

What gigs are you looking forward to in the near future? Anything we’ve missed? Do let us know in the comments.

Cool stuff from the Selectors

Remarkable Birds Mark Avery
We share the earth with more than 10,000 species of birds, so here is your chance to find out everything you didn’t know about the avian world: a fascinating compendium showcasing the extraordinary wonders of birds, illuminated with exquisite ornithological illustrations, prints, and drawings.

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I am Brian Wilson : a memoir Brian Wilson
Good Vibrations : My Life as a Beach Boy Mike Love
I’m showing my age by vividly remember going to the Beach Boys at QEII.  These two excellent memoirs tell the story of the Beach Boys from opposite perspective.  According to the Rolling Stone, both of these books are a must and sure to be good argument-starters.

Footnotes trom the world’s greatest bookstores Bob Eckstein
A collection of seventy-five of the most cherished bookstores from around the world featuring evocative paintings by Eckstein and paired with colourful anecdotes about each shop.  Each store has is quirks, charms and legendary stories with legendary patrons.

Celebrate Everything Darcy Miller
Just in time for the Christmas bash, Celebrate Everything is bursting with advice, inspiration, ideas, crafty projects, and recipes.  Darcy Miller, the founder and editorial director of Martha Stewart Weddings—and one of the world’s most influential celebrations experts—provides the ultimate compilation of party ideas and resource lists to help people plan their parties from beginning to end.  Personally it all looks a bit much for me, but I enjoy looking at the pictures and fantasizing that I could ever find the energy to create such gatherings!

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The Secret Lives of Colour Kassia St Clair
If you love colour and you love history then this could be the ideal book.  Take the colour Dutch Orange for example…

The House of Orange are proof that personal branding isn’t new.  In portrait after portrait, its members are gilded in shades of orange.

Then there is shocking pink as described by Elsa Schiaparelli

The colour flashed in front of my eyes … Bright, impossible, impudent, becoming, life giving, like all the lights and the birds and the fish in the world together, a colour of China and Peru but not the West – a shocking colour, pure and undiluted.

 

Best of 2016 – Staff Pickles

Our team of Staff Pickles pick their faves of the year:

Alina

Alina

Alison

Alison

Dan

Dan

Donna

Donna

Joyce

Joyce

Katherine

Katherine

Moata

Moata

Roberta

Roberta

Memoir, biography and non-fiction

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The Villa at the Edge of the Empire. One Hundred Ways to Read a City by Fiona Farrell (Bronwyn’s pick)
100 tiny pieces of perfect writing about the city we live in.

The Bad-ass Librarians of Timbuktu: And Their Race to Save the World’s Most Precious Manuscripts Joshua Harmer (Donna’s pick)
This is the true story of manuscripts gathered in Timbuktu, Mali & how they are threatened when jihadis take over the city. This is an utterly brilliantly told story about brave and bold librarians and citizens. Better than any thriller.

The Seven Good Years Etgar Keret (Dan’s pick)
The best autobiography I’ve ever and am ever likely to read!

Lab Girl: A Story of Trees, Science and Love Hope Jaren (Alison’s pick)
It is an awesome biography about a woman who loves trees, and her science-soulmate assistant Bill who used to live in a hole. They’re both incredible stranger-than-fiction characters, both passionate about science, both with a few tips about how to be very, very poor and still manage to run a lab. Stories of plants echo events in her own life – growth and roots, pollination and sex, endurance and survival. This one’s inspiring, fascinating and very well written.

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Watching and listening

Black Lotus Shogun Orchestra (Music) (Dan’s pick)
Such groove & feel, almost reminiscent of Mulatu Astatke.

45 Years (Film) (Robyn’s pick)
Ultra-jumbo sized box of tissues required but worth the pain.

Orange is the New Black (TV series) (Robyn’s pick)
Came late to it but love it – highly addictive. Great performances, great stories, Piper is mad annoying but perhaps that’s quite accurate. And she’s in the background more as the series progresses.

Fortitude (TV series) (Dan’s pick)
Cool Scandi-Crime drama.

Fiction

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The Vet’s daughter Barbara Comyns (Joyce’s pick)
Written in the 1950s this slim volume is domestic, sinister and soaked in sadness. Alice is the vet’s daughter and a very unhappy creature. As her life takes turn after turn for the worst she literally starts to untether. Weird but wonderful.

My struggle Book Three: Boyhood Karl Ove Knausgaard (Robyn’s pick)
This is my best book of the year so far, just as Book One, A death in the Family, and Book Two, A Man in Love were my best books of the year I read them in. I have to be on holiday to read them because once you start you cannot stop. I am not a man and I am not Norwegian and I am not a genius (and I think I’m a lot nicer person than Karl) but I have felt every emotion he describes, I just wouldn’t be able to express my feelings with such incredible skill.

American Gods Neil Gaiman (Bronwyn’s pick)
Re-re-reading this fabulous tale in preparation for the upcoming TV miniseries (so I can be all showy-offy when it’s on …)

Speak Louisa Hall (Joyce’s pick)
Humanity’s relationship with technology is told through a variety of narrators in this complex but gripping novel. Alan Turing, a Seventeenth century pilgrim girl, a robot and a variety of imagined scientists narrate their hopes and dreams of connection to the past, present and each other. Poetic and profound I so much wanted Mary Bradford travelling across the waves to her new life in the Americas to be real. Beautiful.

The Broken Earth series N K Jemisin (Alison’s pick)
The Obelisk Gate because it was a stunning sequel to The Fifth Season, delving deeper into the way this fantasy world works (or doesn’t work, as the case may be, as this world is intrinsically broken) full of tragedy, hidden histories, desperate grasps at survival, and utterly fantastic powerful women.

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More of the best