Meet Libby the new OverDrive app

We are pleased to introduce you to the latest member of the OverDrive family, Libby. Libby is a brand new, easy to use app for OverDrive eBooks and eAudioBooks.
Get Libby for Android, iOS and Windows.

Libby isn’t replacing the OverDrive app, so if you’re a current user of the OverDrive app you can keep on using it. But if you are a new user — or a current OverDrive app user interested in a new reading experience — give Libby a try.

Get help with the Libby app [PDF]

Zinio for Libraries is now RBdigital Magazines

Check out the new eMagazine app RBdigital, which is replacing Zinio for Libraries app. The RBdigital app comes with some great new features

  • In-app browsing, previews, title details and checkouts – browse download and read without leaving the app
  • Simple, clear menus
  • App notifications to keep you up to date.

Things you need to know:

  • You can download and start using the new RBdigital app now.
  • You can login using your Zinio for Libraries email/username and password.
  • The Zinio for Libraries app is still available to use until late August.
  • If you continue to use the Zinio for Libraries app, a countdown will appear to remind you to install the new RBdigital app from the app store.
  • eMagazines you have checked out will still be in your personal collection, but they will need to be re-downloaded in the new app, on each device you use. It won’t be possible to transfer content from the old app to the new one.
  • The Zinio for Libraries website’s functionality and appearance will not change but all references to Zinio will now be replaced with RBdigital.
  • Any URLs or links you use to reach the Zinio or RBdigital portal will continue to work.

If you haven’t used Zinio for Libraries maybe it is time to have a look at RBdigital Magazines.
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School Holiday Survival

The school holidays are fast approaching and I have to keep my children entertained for two weeks, oh please help me!! I have actually come up with a plan, so I thought I would share it in case you need help too.

  1. KidsFest – thank goodness someone thought of the parents! I will book children into lots of fun activities and sweet talk their Grandparents into taking them.
  2. Send them outside to play in the freezing cold so I will have heaps of washing to do because it is so muddy (You should see them after football – the mud club).
  3. Put them in front of screens. I know it sounds bad, but hear me out on this one. No playing pointless games with some random character wandering around eating pizza (I think that is what my children were playing). I will set them up with educational activities from the library eResources for kids, they may even enjoy it too!
  4. Give them something to read or listen to – but with a difference. eBook or eAudiobook, or even eMagazine. My kids have just discovered eAudiobooks and love them. It is brilliant – they are so quiet, especially in the back of the car where they would usually fight. OverDrive and Borrowbox have a great selection and it was super easy to download to an iPod shuffe.

Big Library Read is back – Read The Other Einstein from 12 to 26 June

The Other Einstein by Marie Benedict is this month’s Big Library Read. You can get this eBook on OverDrive right now – no holds, no queues, unlimited copies. Meet Mileva Marić, The Other Einstein. Learn all about this remarkable woman by participating in the world’s largest global eBook reading club through libraries, Big Library Read.

In the tradition of The Paris Wife and Mrs. Poe, The Other Einstein offers us a window into a brilliant, fascinating woman whose light was lost in Einstein’s enormous shadow. This is the story of Einstein’s wife, a brilliant physicist in her own right, whose contribution to the special theory of relativity is hotly debated and may have been inspired by her own profound and very personal insight.

RIP Chris Cornell – Soundgarden

Chris Cornell played his final gig with Soundgarden in Detroit on Wednesday night and hours later was found dead in his hotel room. Chris Cornell was best known as singer and songwriter for Seattle grunge band Soundgarden, which had critical success with the 1994 album Superunknown, and Grammy Award winning singles “Black Hole Sun” and “Spoonman”.

Rock’s Backpages has an unpublished, uncut interview with Chris Cornell in 2011 by Pete Makowski that was supposed to be in MOJO, it is an interesting read and talks about early influences, why Soundgarden split up, and his solo acoustic tour.

Other articles in Rock’s Backpages include a Melody Maker review of a 1989 gig, Soundgarden and Mudhoney at the School of African and Oriental Studies in London. It describes Cornell as part monkey, part Adonis and all of a doodah. In an interview with Paul Elliot, from Select June 1996, Chris muses on alcohol, nuns and the President of The United States of America.

Chris Cornell will be sadly missed, especially by Soundgarden and Audioslave fans.

Find music by Chris Cornell in our collection.

All that jazz – Naxos Music Library Jazz is our newest music eResource

We have a new streaming music service — Naxos Music Library Jazz. Good timing for jazz-lovers as the Cavell Leitch New Zealand International Jazz and Blues Festival starts here in Christchurch next week!

Naxos Music Library Jazz has over 9000 jazz albums from over 32,000 artists including luminaries like Miles Davis, Oscar Peterson, and Ella Fitzgerald. It features music from some of the most renowned jazz labels including Blue Note Records, Warner Jazz, EMI, Fantasy and Enja. Use at a library or enter your library card and password/PIN.

Growing up in a house where jazz was often the music of choice, I found all the music from my childhood — Miles, Oscar, Ella, Charlie Parker, Nina Simone …

     

If you are not sure where to start, there are some great playlists. Depending on your jazz tilt, you could try Thelonious Monk from the Piano Legends, or John Coltrane if a saxophone is more your thing. If you’re looking to Take the “A” Train, Take Five, or My Funny Valentine they are all here — and boy do these cats know how to play. Can you dig it? Yes you can.

See more of our music eResources.

Learn a language with Rosetta Stone

We are pleased to introduce our latest eResource Rosetta Stone Library Solution, an online language learning tool. Whether you are looking to lean a brand new language, or brush up on a language for an overseas trip, Rosetta Stone Library Solution is the perfect solution.

Rosetta Stone Library Solution is an interactive language learning resource that uses proven immersion method. This eResource includes 30 languages to meet a range of cultural interests. Learning is structured around core lessons to build reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills and also includes focused activities to refine grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and more. Languages include:

  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • Spanish
  • French
  • Korean
  • Hindi
  • Polish

Read the full list of available languages

It takes the average learner 50 hours to complete a chosen language with the Rosetta Stone Library Solution. If you set aside five 30-minute sessions a week, the average learner would complete their learning in 20 weeks. There is a great mobile app for those wanting to learn on the go.

eResources

See more of our language eResources.

Ukulele lowdown with Lynda

lynda.com logoIs there anything that Lynda can’t do? She is one talented lady. She already starting teaching me how to take better photographs, and do some computer coding.  So for New Zealand Music Month I thought I would find out what hidden musical talents Lynda.com had, and oh boy is there anything she can’t do! She can play and teach:

  • Guitar (Rock, blues, acoustic)
  • Electric Bass
  • Ukulele
  • Banjo
  • Mandolin
  • Drums
  • Piano

Although I have always fancied myself as playing electric bass (like Kim Gordon, or Kim Deal), I actually have a ukulele so I that is what I am learning today. I have convinced my darling daughters to learn with me but I think that is because they want to be like Grace VanderWaal.

So we get started and our teacher knows how to play, they refer to some notes which I quickly found right under the video. Then we were away strumming. Our rendition of When the saints go marching in wasn’t quite as musical sounding as the teacher, but with a bit of practice I think we could start our own ukulele trio.

For more help learning to play the ukulele:

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There are NZ Music Month performances with ukuleles, including a workshop for beginners.

New eResource – The BWB Collections

Bridget Williams Books (BWB) have a series of online collections that are now available at Christchurch City Libraries. This is a collection of high-quality New Zealand non-fiction books which make it an excellent starting place for any research into New Zealand hot topics. We already have the Treaty Collection, which is an excellent start for all Treaty of Waitangi research but now have four more brilliant BWB collections to peruse.

The BWB Texts Collection

BWB Texts are short books on big subjects: succinct narratives from great New Zealand writers spanning:

  • history,
  • memoir,
  • contemporary issues,
  • science
  • and more.

The best thing about the collection is the size, short reads that you can dip into or read the whole thing.

The Critical Issues Collection

The Critical Issues Collection provides full access to over 40 key books addressing the big issues facing New Zealand today:

  • housing,
  • inequality,
  • climate change,
  • child poverty,
  • the environment,
  • migration,
  • financial crisis,
  • and more.

The New Zealand History Collection

The New Zealand History Collection provides complete online access to a major, authoritative resource – over thirty years of award-winning history and biography publishing from Bridget Williams Books.

The New Zealand Sign Language Collection

The New Zealand Sign Language Collection has reference material alongside accounts of Deaf experience.

A great place to start learning about New Zealand’s third official language.

The Treaty of Waitangi Collection

A collection of searchable electronic reference books on the Treaty of Waitangi from leading thinkers on this foundational document.

Researching Aurora Australis

I have been out trying to catch a glimpse of Aurora Australis or the Southern Lights. I spent last evening out on the port hills star gazing, I was unsuccessful again.

My first attempt to see the polar lights was when I was living in the UK and wanted to see the Northern Lights or Aurora Borealis. I booked a weekend in Iceland, which is supposed to have excellent viewing of the northern lights. Alas the weather in Iceland was cloudy, so no Aurora Borealis for me.

My children are now are asking lots of questions so I decided to do some research on the Auroras. My starting place is eDS, the libraries eResources Discovery Search which searches across heaps of eResources all at once. First result was the Research Starter on the Auroras which gives you a really good starting point for information, explaining how phenomena is caused by the interaction of solar radiation with the earth’s atmosphere and magnetic field. Other results include news stories, and articles from magazines such as Australian Geographic.

This got me thinking about another great eResource we have at Christchurch City Libraries, New Zealand Geographic Archive. NZ Geographic always has such great photos and didn’t let me down with this great article Nature’s Neon.

Now I armed with more knowledge about the Auroras will I go stargazing again and try to view the southern lights? Yes, I probably will.

Screen shot of NZ Geographic
A screen shot from New Zealand Geographic Archive – an eResource accessible with your Christchurch City Libraries membership.

Find out more