Podcast – Youth suicide

Speak Up Kōrerotia logoChristchurch City Libraries blog hosts a series of regular podcasts from New Zealand’s only specialist human rights radio show Speak up – Kōrerotia. This show is created by Sally Carlton.

The latest episode deals with youth suicide. New Zealand has high rates of youth suicide, especially among Māori and Pasifika populations.

  • Part I: Sir Peter Gluckman (Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor)
    Youth suicide statistics in NZ and elsewhere; possible reasons; the importance of providing supportive contexts for young people.
  • Parts II and III: Jackie Burrows and Tanith Petersen (He Waka Tapu) and Wesley Mauafu (PYLAT – Pacific Youth Leadership and Transformation). Possible reasons; situation among different ethnic groups; situation in post-earthquake Christchurch and Elements for youth suicide prevention initiatives – sport, music, support, etc.

Transcript of the audio

Find out more

Cover of Suicide awareness and preventioncover of Spin by Dylan Horrocks Cover of Y do u h8 me Cover of Breaking the silence Cover of Sorrows of a century Cover The Roaring Silence A Compendium of Interviews, Essays, Poetry, Art and Prose About Suicide Cover of Twelve Thousand hours Cover of After the Suicide of Someone You Know Information and Support for Young People Cover A Practical Guide to Working With Suicidal Youth Cover of Alcohol information for teens

More about Speak up – Kōrerotia

The show is also available on the following platforms:

Auē! Me tangi noa ahau ki muri nei

My grandfather’s brother never came back from World War One. He’s buried in Armentières, France. My grandmother’s brother lost his leg, so the family farm in Southland had to be sold – he couldn’t take up his inheritance. My great aunt’s fiancé returned a shell-shocked alcoholic – PTSD, they’d call it these days. They parted and she never married.

In the retellings of the larger stories of war it is often these vignettes of personal loss, the consequences felt by loved ones, that speak quietly but with a universal relatability.

I found myself thinking of those members of my family, and the war that changed their lives, when listening to the beautiful lament E Pari Rā.

Written by Paraire Tomoana (Ngāti Kahungunu and Ngāti Te Whatu-i-āpiti leader) for his relative, kuia Maku-i-te-Rangi Ellison, E Pari Rā gives a lasting voice to her pain and grief over the loss of her son Whakatomo Ellison, who died in the battle of the Somme. Its beautiful metaphor for grief as the surging tide is both deeply personal, and universal.

E pari rā

E pari rā e ngā tai ki te ākau. / The tides surge onto the seashore
E hotu rā ko taku manawa. / with each throb of my heart.
Auē! Me tangi noa / Alas! Weeping without restraint
Ahau i muri nei / for I am left behind, 
Te iwi e he ngākau tangi noa. / everyone is utterly heart-broken.

Tēnā rā! Tahuri mai! / So please come back, return
E te tau! te aroha. / my beloved, my love
Tēnei rā ahau te tangi nei. / I weep here
Mōhou kua wehea nei. / for you now far away
Haere rā! mahara mai. / Farewell! And remember, 
E te tau! kia mau ki au. / Beloved! Be true to me
Haere rā! ka tūturu ahau. / Farewell! I will be true to you
Haere Rā! / Farewell!

Haere rā e tama / Farewell young man
Haere rā. / Farewell.
Haria rā te aroha i ahau / Take my love with you
Auē! Me tangi noa / Alas! Tears fall
Ahau ki muri nei / as I am left behind here
Te iwi e he ngākau tangi noa. / the hearts of your people weep openly

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Record Store Day – Saturday 21 April 2018

Record Store Day is on this Saturday 21 April. It is an annual international event designed to celebrate the record store as a community. For more info, read Russell Brown’s Friday Music post The Shopping news and What’s happening for Record Store Day across NZ, this Saturday? Peter McLennan on Dub dot dash.
Here is our compilation of what’s happening here in Ōtautahi.

What’s on in Christchurch

Galaxy Records

Galaxy Records on 336 St Asaph St are an “Indie Institution’ in Christchurch, selling new and used vinyl. Like Galaxy Records on Facebook.
Record Store Day at Galaxy Records: Subscribe to the Facebook event
Rare & Collectable goodies! Featuring DJs: Pinacolada Soundsystem , Missy G & Skew-whiff from midday. Darkroom Bar will be open

Lyttelton Records

Lyttelton Records have spilled out of their home recording studio to open a shop (and bar) in Woolston. You can buy merch here, guitar strings and maybe catch a live performance. Like Lyttelton Records on Facebook.
Record Store Day at Lyttelton Records: Vinyl discounts, live music, happy hour 12pm to 4pm 650 Ferry Road

Penny Lane Records

If you are a record store fan in Christchurch, you can visit Penny Lane Records – they are at Eastgate Mall in Linwood, and in Sydenham at 430 Colombo Street. Penny Lane specialise in great quality second-hand music formats and collectibles. Like Penny Lane Records on Facebook.
Record Store Day at Penny Lane Records: The crew were cagey as to what’s happening – so there might be some good surprises on offer. What they did say was they are open at 8am, there will be Record Store Day exclusives available, and stuff happening for customers, as well as specials.

(here’s a pic from RSD 2017 at Penny Lane)

Sadhana Surf and House of Creativity

Sadhana Surfboards is at Shop 52 at The Tannery, 3 Garlands Road Woolston. Like Sadhana Surf on Facebook

sadhana
Sadhana Surfboards

Another hot tip for record fans: Vinyl Cafe at 24b Essex Street is a must visit for vinyl lovers. Like Vinyl Cafe on Facebook,

Get on down to your local record shop, buy yourself some vinyl to spin while the weather goes wild. Talk to people who appreciate quality music. Who knows you may make a new connection…

Record Appreciation – Fee

I love records! I still have a halfway decent collection of records. When I had to replace my stereo a few years back, I made sure it came with a turntable. I’m a purist – like Neil Young I can hear more depth and texture of sound in an LP (Long Player), than I can on a CD or a download. Neil developed PonoMusic to develop modern sound recording formats that delivered quality of sound almost as good as the studio, or the original record. (See Waging Heavy Peace, one of Neil’s engaging autobiographies.)

Other bands and artists such as Iron Maiden and New Zealand’s Shayne P. Carter, have steadfastly resolved to continue releasing albums on vinyl as well as other formats. Shayne P. Carter has been heard to lament the difficulty of reducing sleeve artwork to fit CD cases. I sure as heck can’t read the release date on CDs, and most won’t tell you when the original album was recorded. The discussion about sound continues…

Did you know that you can still buy turntables? I’ve discovered them at The Warehouse, The Listening Post (330 St Asaph Street), the Top Hi-Fi Shop (35 Carlyle St, Sydenham), and Soundline Audio (329 Madras St), Harvey Norman and JB Hi-Fi.

Now to put the record collection in alphabetical order

Record Store Day resources

Vinyl and music at the library

Fee and Donna
Vinyl appreciators

New view for tukutuku

Kaokao (variation 2), currently on loan to Christchurch Art Gallery

If you happen to visit the Christchurch Art Gallery in the next few months you’ll see a piece of Christchurch City Libraries on display.

Ten of the library’s tukutuku panels are on temporary loan as part of an exhibition put together by assistant curator Nathan Pohio called ‘Moroki‘. This word refers to something with an ongoing nature and expresses continuity. In this instance the focus is on historic and contemporary Māori artworks that offer insight into the relationships between Māori art and architecture, and is part of a wider exhibition highlighting 19th and 20th century New Zealand art currently on display at the art gallery.

This is not the first time the tukutuku panels have had a temporary change of home.

Created in 2001 as part of a community art project led by Ngā Puna Waihanga, 19 tukutuku panels were installed in Ngā Pounamu Māori, the Māori resource area on the 2nd floor of the Central Library in 2002. 

After the library building was damaged in the 2011 Christchurch earthquakes the panels were removed and eventually distributed to a number of libraries around the network. The tukutuku panels currently on loan to the art gallery were previously housed at the Linwood and Aranui libraries. When Tūranga, the new central library building currently under construction in Cathedral Square, opens the tukutuku panels will again be brought together and displayed with the Māori collection.

Tukutuku panels
Tukutuku panels on display in Ngā Pounamu Māori, Central Library, 26 July 2002. Flickr CE-Refurb-MaoriPanels

The ten tukutuku panels currently on display at the art gallery sit across from paintings of Māori architecture and carvings, and the colours, shapes and designs on the panels really have an opportunity to shine when placed alongside other artworks.

If you want to know more about how, why and by whom the library’s tukutuku panels were created check out our Puāwaitanga o te Ringa – Fruits of our busy hands resource for photos of the panels along with explanations of the different designs and their meanings.

Victoria Square reopens – Friday 9 March 2018

Today Victoria Square has reopened. It has been closed for a year, having a revamp and repairs.

What’s new:

  • New pieces of art have been added including Ngā Whāriki Manaaki – Woven mats of welcome, and a Literary Trail (series of text sculptures).
  • The Bowker Fountain will be working again and will put on a water and light display.

Here’s what Victoria Square looked like this morning:

Find out more about Victoria Square

Big little books – The BWB Texts Collection

The last book I got out of the library was huge a whopping 800 pages. It was a little daunting and I wondered it would be easier to read if it was a series of smaller books. Bridget Williams has a great series of little books called the BWB Texts Collection. There are some seriously good reads in this collection and all of them are short. There are some great short memoirs, and other interesting topics like combining motherhood and politics, and the Australia vs New Zealand debate.

BWB Texts are available in book and eBook format.

There are even big little books with local flavour. With the seventh anniversary of the Christchurch earthquake coming up, there are some great books on Christchurch and analysis of the earthquake – or find out why Christchurch was once nicknamed Cyclopolis.

As well as the BWB Texts Collection. Bridget Williams Books has these other great New Zealand eBook collections:

Kōmako: Reclaiming the Māori literary tradition

I’ve discovered a new online tool that I want to tell you about.

Kōmako is an online bibliography of writing by Māori in English, which has grown out of research undertaken by Bridget Underhill at the University of Canterbury. Kōmako lists Māori writing from over the past 180 years, gathers it in one place and makes it publicly accessible. This is extremely helpful for research purposes and gives visibility to some amazing works by both well-known and lesser-known Māori authors.

Kōmako utilizes the wonders of modern technology for the searcher – I can type in my iwi and be returned with a list of available writing on my iwi or I can type in my last name and see a list of my Aunty’s poetry. Anybody accessing this resource can search by author, title or iwi to find fiction, non-fiction or even music by Māori writers to go off and try to find at their local library.

Māori writers are one of my favourite things to talk about and here at Christchurch City Libraries we have a fantastic Ngā Pounamu Māori collection which covers a wide range of topics produced by a variety of sources. While they all have their individual merits Māori authors can give us an insider’s view on Te Ao Māori, which is both valuable and necessary to our understanding of a given topic: we would not ask a lawyer what it’s like to be a doctor, we would ask a doctor. As such the cultural insight provided by the Māori writers listed on Kōmako is a taonga, something to be both cherished and celebrated.

While we’re on the topic, check out some my favourite resources by Māori authors held at Christchurch City Libraries:

Find out more

Te Tiriti o Waitangi / The Treaty of Waitangi, 1840

Waitangi Day is coming up so why not find out more about the Treaty of Waitangi? The Treaty of Waitangi Collection is an amazing resource. It has all the essential content for learning about the history of the Treaty and its relevance today. The collection is indexed by place and iwi so you can explore the history of the Treaty by your iwi or by your area. Bridget Williams Books and Christchurch City Libraries have provided this fact sheet on Treaty of Waitangi in the Canterbury region. This includes facts like:

Tī ovens (umu-tī) that date from the thirteenth century have been found in South Canterbury. These ovens were used to cook the roots and lower stems of young cabbage trees.
Read more about pre- European archaeology in chapter three of Tangata Whenua in the Treaty of Waitangi Collection.

By 1800, an estimated 20,000 people lived in the tribal area of Ngāi Tahu. This population spread from Kaikōura on the east coast and Tai Poutini on the west all the way down to Rakiura (Stewart Island) and other southern islands.
Read more about Ngāi Tahu in chapter one of New Myths and Old Politics in the Treaty of Waitangi Collection.

eBook titles in the Treaty of Waitangi Collection include:

Te Tiriti o Waitangi / The Treaty of Waitangi 1840

This eBook has reproductions of the nine sheets of the Treaty of Waitangi, comprising of the original document first signed at Waitangi on 6 February 1840 and eight copies. It also provides information about the sheets, and a map, and information about where the Treaty was signed. This title also includes some short biographies of many of the signatories, which show the range of people who signed Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

He Whakaputanga/The Declaration of Independence, 1835

He Whakaputanga o te Rangatiratanga o Nu Tireni – known in English as the Declaration of Independence of the United Tribes of New Zealand – is a constitutional document of historical and cultural significance. It was signed first by a group of powerful Northern chiefs at British Resident James Busby’s house at Waitangi. Also included in this title are some short biographies of some of the signatories.

The Treaty of Waitangi by Claudia Orange

Claudia Orange has produced several works on the Treaty of Waitangi including this award-winning title published in 1987. Other Treaty titles by Claudia Orange available in the BWB Treaty of Waitangi Collection include The Story of a Treaty; An illustrated History of the Treaty of Waitangi; What Happened at Waitangi?

Stories without End: Essays 1975-2010 by Judith Binney

This is just one of Judith Binney’s books that is available on the Treaty of Waitangi, she is regarded as one of New Zealand’s leading scholars on the subject. This book is a selection of essays that explore sidepaths and previously unexamined histories. They notably delve into the lives of powerful early Māori figures, including the prophets Rua Kenana and Te Kooti, their wives and their descendants, and the leaders of the Urewera.

More about Te Tiriti o Waitangi

Waitangi Day in Christchurch and Canterbury – Tuesday 6 February 2018

Find out about Waitangi Day celebrations and events for 2018:

Rapaki Marae citizenship ceremony
6 February 2014. Rapaki Marae citizenship ceremony. Photo supplied by Christchurch City Council. Flickr 2014-02-06-Citizenship6Feb2014PR-0103

Ngāi Tahu Treaty Festival Te Rau Aroha Marae, Bluff

Every year Ngāi Tahu commemorates Waitangi Day at one of three locations where the iwi signed the Treaty — Awarua, Ōtākou and Ōnuku. In 2018, the Ngāi Tahu Treaty Festival is hosted by Te Rūnaka o Awarua at Te Rau Aroha Marae.

Okains Bay Māori and Colonial Museum 1146 Main Road, Okains Bay

On Tuesday 6 February, the Okains Bay Māori and Colonial Museum has its 43rd annual family day to commemorate the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. Highlights include a pōwhiri (traditional welcome), hāngī lunch, children’s races, construction of sand volcanoes, and the paddling of our magnificent waka on the Ōpara River at 9:30am. View the Museum’s amazing collections and enjoy continuous demonstrations all day including bread baking in a traditional clay oven, master weavers, working blacksmith and print shop. Crafts, stalls, lolly scramble, sausage sizzle, espresso coffee, garden bar, cafeteria and more!

Entrance Adults $10, Children $2. Please bring cash. No ATM available.
Gates open at 8:30am. Waka paddling at 9:30am. Pōwhiri (traditional welcome) commences at 10:30am.
Please phone the Okains Bay Museum for more details. 03 304 8611.

Download Waitangi Day events at Okains Bay Māori and Colonial Museum [378KB PDF].

Waitangi Day celebrations at the Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu

Commemorate Waitangi Day at the Christchurch Art Gallery:

Construction with artist Peter Trevelyan

Head to the Gallery on Waitangi Day to help create a giant interactive three-dimensional artwork with New Zealand artist Peter Trevelyan.

Weaving workshop

A special adults-only weaving workshop for Waitangi Day. $15 per person, booking required.

LEGO workshop for kids

$5 per child, sessions at 11am, 1pm, and 2.30pm. Bookings required.

CoCa – Centre of Contemporary Art

Workshop: Kai & Kōrero: Te Tiriti o Waitangi 12pm

Artist Isla Reeves will facilitate a Waitangi Day discussion in conjunction with CoCA. This event has been formed so as to honour the significance of what Waitangi Day means to the young, indigenous members of the Ōtautahi arts communities.With a line up of performers, writers, artists and musicians, we will be discussing the value of Te Tiriti to our society, how this resonates with our individual views of Te Ao Maori within our art, and in turn, how this registers within a Pakeha context. Subscribe to the Facebook event. You’re invited to join us from 12 noon for shared kai and kōrero.

Eating the Earth: Spoken Word Workshop with RikTheMost 2pm

Come spend Waitangi afternoon at CoCA for a spoken word workshop with UK powerhouse of poetry, RikTheMost! $10 per person. Fees help CoCA to pay the facilitators, but in the interests of accessibility, a cash Koha of your choice is an option .Book ticket.

I love New Brighton Thomson Park, Marine Parade, New Brighton 11am to 3pm

The “I Love New Brighton” Annual Event is a local festival day that celebrates New Brighton. The 2018 event is again on Waitangi Day at Thomson Park, Marine Parade from 11am to 3pm. Lots of free activities, have-a-go sports, market stalls, food stalls, bouncy castles, face painting, games and a LIVE stage featuring local bands. Subscribe to the I love New Brighton event on Facebook.

Kaiapoi Waitangi Day Family Celebration Event Troussellot Park, Kaiapoi 10am to 2pm

Kaiapoi’s Annual Waitangi Day family celebration event is on again at Trousselot Park, Kaiapoi. Activities include: Music, Entertainment, Food Stalls, Market Stalls and Waitangi Day Quiz with great prizes up for grabs.

  • Free Bouncy Castle
  • Face Painting
  • Bubble Balls
  • Pony Rides
  • Sport Suzy Performing

Hangi meals being sold by Kaiapoi High School as a fundraiser for their Kapa Haka group.

Waitangi Community Fun Day Darfield Domain 10am to 2pm

Bouncy castles, Pedalmania, face painting Faeries, pony rides, Lego building, Darfield Library storytimes and activities, live music, balloon twisting acrobatic clown entertainment, plenty of interactive activities from circus skills, art, and community services, and fun games. Farmer’s Market produce and craft stalls. There will be a variety of food and drink to purchase, or bring your own picnic to enjoy. Subscribe to the Facebook event.

Find out more

Waka launch, Waitangi Day, Okain’s Bay
Waka launch, Waitangi Day, Okain’s Bay, 6 February 1977 Flickr: HWC08-SO10

Moriori artifacts : weapons, implements and god (a figure of the Moriori god Hatitimatangi): Picturing Canterbury

Moriori artifacts : weapons, implements and god (a figure of the Moriori god Hatitimatangi). File Reference CCL PhotoCD 17, IMG0069.

Moriori artifacts : weapons, implements and god (a figure of the Moriori god Hatitimatangi).
[ca. 1877].

Prior to the 1980s the Chatham Islands were part of the Lyttelton general electorate.

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