Whaikōrero – Te Wiki o te Reo Māori – Rāhoroi

Whaikōrero – is an art form.
Kōrero Māori – is possible for all of us.

Te Aka defines whaikōrero as: Formal eloquent language using imagery, metaphor, whakataukī, pepeha, kupu whakaari, relevant whakapapa and references to tribal history is admired. Kōrero (as a verb) is defined as: to tell, say, speak, read, talk, address.

Cover for Manu rere i te rangi Cover for The Awakening Cover for Whaikōrero - the world of Māori Oratory

Ngā Kete Wānanga o Ōtautahi is the kaitiaki of our permanent Nga Pounamu Māori collection. Within these collections, taonga abound. Not only are some available in beautifully presented pukapuka but also through our Wheelers eBook platform. One available in both print and eBook format is Whaikorero: The World of Maori Oratory by Poia Rewi:

Winner of the 2011 NZSA E.H. McCormick Best First Book Award for Non-Fiction, New Zealand Post Book Awards.
The judges felt that Rewi’s book ‘managed the difficult feat of being both a valuable record and manual of Māori oratory for practitioners, and an accessible overview for anyone interested in this ubiquitous cultural practice.’

Whilst the ability to be an outstanding orator (in any language) is beyond many of us, to use Te Reo Māori everyday certainly is not.

On line Te Reo Māori ExhibitionWe can start by knowing and using Ngā Ingoa Māori – the names of places right here in Ōtautahi me Waitaha.

We can also explore the range of pukapuka me moheni published in te Reo Māori available at your local library.

I am a strong advocate of the use of children’s Te Reo Māori books to help my confidence with Kōrero Māori – the pictures often help with the kupu I do not know, ngā rerenga can be short and simple and often there is an English publication for when I get really stuck.

Kia whakatipua te kaipanui – growing readers

Try reading one with your tamariki, rangatahi or mokopuna – ka pai akoronga mo tātou.

Cover for Whakaeke i nga ngaru - Gavin BishopTry Short stories for teens and adults – ‘You only Live once”.
We have graphic novels and  purākau me pakiwaitara in te Reo Maori.

For those of you who like to browse a magazine or periodical, Mana and Te Karaka (online) contain plenty of te teo Māori and some very cool reading to immerse yourself in too.

Karawhiua! Give it a go. Kōreroreo mai

Quick questions with Margaret Wilson

Cover of The Struggle for SovereigntyMargaret Wilson is coming to Christchurch on Sunday 30 August to speak on The Struggle for Sovererignty. This event is part of the Shifting Points of View – WORD Christchurch at the Christchurch Arts Festival.  Margaret is Professor of Law and Public Policy at the University of Waikato, and she has been an MP and Speaker of Parliament. She will be in conversation with Dr Bronwyn Hayward, author and political scientist at the University of Canterbury.

This session is timely and relevant:

In the era of public choice and free markets, and when widespread public protest against global treaties such as the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement is having little effect, does the New Zealand state still have the best interests of its individual citizens at heart? Margaret Wilson argues that the shift to a neo-liberal public policy framework has profoundly affected the country’s sovereignty and that New Zealanders must continue to engage in the struggle to retain it for the sake of individual and community wellbeing.

Thanks to Margaret for answering our quick questions.

What are you looking forward to doing in Christchurch?

I’m looking forward to meeting people in Christchurch who share my values.

What do you think about libraries?

Libraries are essential for a democratic community – they provide pleasure, knowledge and well being for a community. (My sister is a librarian!)

What would be your “desert island book”?

I would take the bible and the Koran to try understand why religion is so important to so many people.

Share a surprising fact about yourself.

If I had the time and money I would tour the world watching cricket.

Happy birthday to Parklands Library

The fabulous community library at Parklands is celebrating ten years. There are some events on next week – come along and join in with the people of Parklands to have some fun.

Parklands 10th Anniversary - Facebook tile

Hip Hip Hurrah! – Story-telling and craft

Wednesday, August 5, 2015 (3:30PM – 4:15PM)
A birthday themed Storytime for Parklands Library which is celebrating its 10th anniversary this week, and for our favourite cat Slinky Malinky who turns 25 this year! For ages 3-7yrs.

3D Printer Taster

Thursday, August 6, 2015 (3:30PM – 5:00PM)
Calling all 3D tinkerers! Check out a 3D printer in action at Parklands library with a live demonstration and find out how you can start creating your own 3D designs using free software.

Family Fun Day

Saturday, August 8, 2015 (11:00AM – 3:00PM)

Live music and storytelling – a day for the whole family.

Better than Bacon – Live Music (11:00am-11:45am)
These young local rockers took Parklands by storm during May Music Month and now they’re back to help us celebrate our birthday! All ages

Tales with Tania – Story-telling (1:00pm – 1:30pm)
Stories, rhymes and music from our very own story-telling superstar Tania! Ages 3-5yrs

New Brighton Ukulele Pirates – Live Music (2:00pm-2:45pm)
Shiver yer timbers, these ukulele playing pirates will have the whole family singing and dancing with original pirate tunes and well-known classics. All ages – bring your ukulele!

There are also the usual Parklands activities, crochet, Science Alive, storytimes and more. Parklands is a lovely library with friendly staff, so if you haven’t been in – come and visit!

Sheep at Parklands Library

Sheep at Parklands Library. Art by Sally Blake and Knitting Ninjas. Flickr 2015-07-29-IMG_8422

Parklands Library

Parklands Library. Flickr 2015-07-29-IMG_8415

Remember Hiroshima and Nagasaki – bombed 70 years ago

The atomic bomb named “Little Boy” was dropped by American airmen on the Japanese city of Hiroshima on 6 August 1945. Three days later on 9 August 1945, the atomic bomb “Fat Man” was dropped over Nagasaki.

The Hiroshima explosion destroyed 90 percent of the city and killed approximately 80,000 people; tens of thousands more died later from radiation exposure. The Nagasaki A-bomb killed approximately 40,000 people.

Find out about commemorations in Christchurch.

Hiroshima - Small child with baby on back searching for anything of usefulness. New Zealand. Department of Internal Affairs. War History Branch :Photographs relating to World War 1914-1918, World War 1939-1945, occupation of Japan, Korean War, and Malayan Emergency. Ref: J-0012-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23130201

Hiroshima – Small child with baby on back searching for anything of usefulness. New Zealand. Department of Internal Affairs. War History Branch :Photographs relating to World War 1914-1918, World War 1939-1945, occupation of Japan, Korean War, and Malayan Emergency. Ref: J-0012-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23130201

I remember reading the comic book series Barefoot Gen, and following him through ravaged Hiroshima. And Sadako and the thousand cranes – based on a true story – Sadako had developed leukemia from radiation.

And later, reading harrowing eyewitness reports from Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

There’s a statue of Sadako in the Hiroshima Peace Park, at its feet a plaque that reads:

“This is our cry. This is our prayer. Peace on Earth.”

Find out more about Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Cover of Yoko's diary Cover of Last train to Hiroshima Cover of Barefoot Gen Cover of Hiroshima Cover of First into Nagasaki Cover of Nagasaki

Christchurch commemorations

Bell ringing

Thursday 6 August 11.15 am at the World Peace Bell in Christchurch Botanic Gardens.

As in recent years, the NZ Chapter of The World Peace Bell Association is participating in an international bell ringing to mark the exact time of the Hiroshima A bombing 70 years ago (8.15 am Japan time. 11.15 NZ time.) The event originated with peace campaigner SuZen in NYC. She organizes a huge event in New York Central Park every Hiroshima anniversary. This being the 70th anniversary of Hiroshima, it is suggested we ring the bell once for every year. It would be great to have church bells, tram bells, and any other bells joining in.

Information from the World Peace Bell Association.

70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki at 5pm on Sunday 9 August at the World Peace Bell in the Botanic Gardens.

The Disarmament and Security Centre would like to invite you to join us to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki at 5pm on Sunday 9 August at the World Peace Bell in the Botanic Gardens. The Mayor will be one of the speakers.  There will be a gathering afterwards at 6pm at the YMCA for soup and bread and a time to catch up.

HiroshimaDay2015Poster
Find out more about the World Peace Bell in the Christchurch Botanic Gardens and its connection to Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Flowers under the Peace Bell
Flowers under the Peace Bell, Flickr CCL-2014-02-22-22February2014 DSC_1215.JPG

Quick questions with Anna Smaill

Cover of The ChimesAnna Smaill, author of the wonderful moody and musical dystopian novel The Chimes, is coming to Christchurch.

She is speaking on the panel Imaginary Cities as part of WORD Shifting Points of view in the Christchurch Arts Festival.

Thanks to Anna for answering our quick questions.

What are you looking forward to doing in Christchurch?

Both my parents grew up in Christchurch, so we often came down for family holidays and I have many childhood memories of the city, as well as more recent ones from the two years I spent there as a student. However, I haven’t visited properly since the earthquake. What I really want to do is simply walk around for a few hours, visiting and remembering old places, but also taking in the changes and the new landscape and life of the city.

What do you think about libraries?

Libraries are lifeblood! We grew up within walking distance of our local library (Leys Institute in Ponsonby), and for my sister, brother and me it was variously a source of entertainment, education, after-school care and, finally, employment (we each worked there as shelvers then library assistants).

I always feel happy in libraries. They seem like places of equality and wondrous possibility – built around this essential humanist ideal that everyone deserves access to knowledge and literature. Now I take my daughter to Newtown Library in Wellington, and to Wellington Central, and it’s great to feel that connection starting up again.

What would be your “desert island book”?

Cover of War and PeaceAh, that’s a hard one. I’m tempted to echo the very astute Helen Macdonald and cover all bases by opting for The Complete Works of Shakespeare. But I do think I’d miss the texture and immersion of fiction. So, I’m going to take War and Peace, because it has the broadest emotional scope of anything I’ve ever read, and because its great length means I’m less likely to be driven mad by repetition before I’m rescued.

Share a surprising fact about yourself

Most of my bio notes point out that I trained as a violinist, but I don’t usually mention my brief but thrilling tenure as a trombonist in my school jazz band. I really miss the trombone – what an instrument it is! Such swagger and sensitivity! I often daydream about taking it up again.

More Quick questions with WORD Christchurch guests.

This week in Christchurch history (27 July to 2 August)

28 July 1986
Grenadier Hotel demolished in Oxford Terrace. Formerly The Royal, it was the third hotel on this site since 1851.

Cars parked outside the Grenadier Hotel in Oxford Terrace [ca. 1960]
Cars parked outside the Grenadier Hotel in Oxford Terrace [ca. 1960], CCL PhotoCD 11, IMG0049
29 July 1953
Aviation pioneer Richard W. Pearse dies in Christchurch. Pearse made one of the world’s first powered flights on or about 31 March 1902 in South Canterbury. He moved to Christchurch in 1921 and worked on his astonishing “convertiplane” over many years.

30 July 1976
7 Canterbury men in gold medal winning hockey team at the Montreal Olympics. See our page on Canterbury Olympians.

31 July 1856
By Royal Charter, Christchurch becomes New Zealand’s first city. Christchurch became New Zealand’s first city in 1856 under the terms of a royal charter. This was because it was the ‘seat’, or base, for a bishop. The Reverend Henry John Chitty Harper was consecrated, or made a bishop, by the Archbishop of Canterbury, and arrived with his family in Lyttelton on 23 December 1856.

1 August 1929
“Lyttelton Times” re-named “Christchurch Times” after being taken over by Auckland interests. In fact, the paper had moved from Lyttelton to Christchurch in 1863.

1 August 1975
Severe nor-west gale causes serious damage throughout city and province. Winds gust to a record 172 kilometres per hour (107 miles per hour). Over 250 injuries in Canterbury, and many forests devastated.

More July and August events in the Christchurch chronology: a timeline of Christchurch events in chronological order from pre-European times to 1989.

2015’s Community Read with local author Rachael King

Community Read 2015 Magpie Hall

2015: One book, one community

Magpie Hall by Rachael King

This August, Christchurch City Libraries invites you to read, share and discuss Magpie Hall by Rachael King.

Unlimited copies of the Magpie Hall eBook will be available to borrow for the whole of August from our Wheelers eBook platform! Thanks Wheelers and publishers Penguin Random House.
Reserve now.

Take a walk with us on the dark side, as we explore family secrets, taxidermy, Victorian tattooing, and Gothic novels.

I absolutely loved this book. It had a wonderfully familiar setting in the Canterbury foothills somewhere, mixing family history mysteries with the pressures of modern life. I was spellbound.

Magpie Hall by Rachael KingFind out more

Community Read 2015 author talk

Book Chat, Tea and Tales with award-winning author Rachael King
Friday 7 August At South Library
11am to 12pm

Community Read 2015 Performance

Join the Court Jesters as they improvise themes from Magpie Hall
Friday 7 August at South Library
7.30pm to 9pm

For more information phone (03) 941 5140

Helping Canterbury kids with anxiety

A new resource for parents, teachers and the children of Canterbury to help children cope with anxiety was launched recently. Maia and the Worry Bug (for families) and Wishes and Worries (for classroom use) are two picture books that make up an anxiety management resource.

Maia and the Worry Bug is about the worry bug that moves in with Maia and her family. It makes them worry about all sorts of things. Mum worries about whether the family are safe, Dad worries about whether Mum has fixed the bookcase to the wall properly and if the emergency kit has everything it needs, and Maia doesn’t want to leave the house. Their worries get so bad that they finally have to come up with a way to get rid of the worry bug for good. As well as the story there are also exercises and discussion questions in the back of the book for families to work through together.

The Worry Bug project is the brainchild of two Christchurch women; psychologist Julie Burgess-Manning and teacher Sarina Dickson, with illustrations by the wonderful Jenny Cooper. The books were made possible by receiving funding from the Canterbury Community Trust and Canterbury Earthquake Appeals Trust.

The resource will be given out free to all new entrant – Year 4 children and classrooms in Christchurch city and the Selwyn and Waimakariri districts in Term 3.

As well as Maia and the Worry Bug we have some other great resources in the library to help children cope with anxiety:

This week in Christchurch history (20 to 26 July)

20 July 1851
First church in Christchurch opened – later dedicated as St Michael and All Angels in 1859.

Old St. Michael's Church, corner of Oxford Terrace and Lichfield Street [ca. 1861]
Old St. Michael’s Church, corner of Oxford Terrace and Lichfield Street [ca. 1861], CCL PhotoCD 10, IMG0003
23 July 1851
Pioneer William Deans among 28 lost in the wreck of the Maria in Cook Strait. Godley had tried to deprive the Deans and Hay families of their farms because he wanted only Anglicans to own land in the new settlement. The Deans brothers had sold sheep to pay the legal costs of fighting Godley’s high handed action, and William Deans was travelling to Sydney to buy replacement stock.

23 July 1857
First dramatic presentation in Canterbury, which featured Mrs Foley in “The Loan of a Lover” and “Betsy Baker” at the Lyttelton Town Hall. (see an advertisement in the 25 July 1857 Lyttelton Times).

Papers Past clipping from Page 5 Advertisements Column 2 Lyttelton Times, 25 July 1857
Papers Past clipping from Page 5 Advertisements Column 2 Lyttelton Times, 25 July 1857

24 July 1983
New Zealand’s first “test-tube” twins born at Christchurch Hospital.

26 July 1879
Canterbury Rugby Football Association (New Zealand’s first) formed. See our page on early rugby in Christchurch.

More July events in the Christchurch chronology: a timeline of Christchurch events in chronological order from pre-European times to 1989.

Government Life building in Cathedral Square – opened 17 July 1964

On 17 July 1964 the Government Life Building opened in Cathedral Square. One of my favourite photos in our entire collection is this one of its construction –Workers on top of Government Life. For me, it is the Ōtautahi version of the famous Lunch atop a Skyscraper (New York Construction Workers Lunching on a Crossbeam).

The Post Office tower is dwarfed in this view, taken from the top of the Government Life Insurance building in the Square.  [Mar. 1963] CCL PhotoCD 11, IMG0059
The Post Office tower is dwarfed in this view, taken from the top of the Government Life Insurance building in the Square. [Mar. 1963] CCL PhotoCD 11, IMG0059

That iconic clock has been a landmark of the central city – when it was turned off lots of us missed looking up to see the time (and the temperature).

Government Life Building showing clock 12:45 4 July 1963 CCCPlans Government-Life-11-2
Government Life Building showing clock 12:45 4 July 1963 CCCPlans Government-Life-11-2

In the 1965 photo above, you can see it is 1:52pm.

Christchurch Cathedral Junction and Woodwards Corner, Kete Christchurch Christchurch Cathedral Junction and Woodwards Corner, 1965. Kete Christchurch

Post earthquakes, Mike Hewson’s artwork Government Life Suspension reflected the building back for us.

Government life art by Mike Hewson. Tuesday 22 January 2013. Flickr: CCL-2013-01-22-IMG_2308
Government life art by Mike Hewson. Tuesday 22 January 2013. Flickr: CCL-2013-01-22-IMG_2308

The Government Life building was demolished in 2014.

Government Life building. Wednesday 18 June 2014. Flickr: 2014-06-17-IMG_0287
Government Life building. Wednesday 18 June 2014. Flickr: 2014-06-17-IMG_0287

Government Life demolition
Government Life demolition. Thursday 16 October 2014. Flickr 2014-10-16-IMG_2635

See more: