The Atomic Weight of Love

Book cover of The Atomic Weight of Love by Elizabeth J ChurchThe Atomic Weight of Love is the debut novel of Elizabeth J. Church and I hope we see a lot more books from her. This book is an ideal Christmas present. It appeals to a wide audience and will make a great holiday read and is not without a little racy love interest.

Meridian has won a place at the University of Chicago where she studies ornithology working towards a graduate degree and eventual doctorate. Just as her wings are opening and she starts to glimpse new horizons she falls in love with a college professor two decades older than herself and her wings are clipped.

It is written in a memoir style following Meridian as a woman growing up in the 1940s through the fifties and sixties into the seventies and the emergence of women’s liberation. You will find yourself reflecting at times how so much has changed yet still remains the same.

Meri marries Alden and follows him to Los Alamos where she attempts to fit into the group of ex-academic wives she meets there. It is the era when a wife is expected to follow their husband and make the best of it. She struggles to be a good wife while salvaging something of her studies by continuing to study Crows, having left her graduate study dreams behind her.

The novel’s dual strands, the place of women with the emergence of the women’s liberation movement, and the atomic bomb with its resulting anti-war Vietnam and Korean war movements, almost splits it characters by gender over its two themes.

Some of the characters could do with more development – they feel a little clichéd. It seems women have little to say on war in this novel and men little say on the home front. Even for the times this feels a little stretched. She skims over the women who Meridian meets in Los Alamos except her best friend Belle, a strong woman who urges her not to minimise herself yet when it comes to the crunch still tells her to stay in her marriage and try to make it work.

That being said bird studies draw amusing parallels between human and bird society. Each section of the novel starts with an ornithological reference “A Parliament of Owls”, “A Deceit of Lapwings, “A Murder of Crows”. When Meridian meets Clay, a young hippie ex-marine about two decades younger than her, it seems they are about to repeat past mistakes. Her husband seems not to understand her sacrifice while her lover urges her to soar again.

Read the novel to find out if she does.

It is an enjoyable debut novel with a poetical style and reminds me of The Guernsey Potato Peel Literary Society, The Light between Oceans and The Shipping news. If you like nature and have a slightly scientific bent you will enjoy it and even learn a little physics on the way.

The Atomic Weight of Love
by Elizabeth J. Church
Published by HarperCollins New Zealand
ISBN: 9780008209292

DECONSTRUCTION RECONSTRUCTED – an exhibition at Central Library Peterborough

Hard hats on … you are about to enter a construction zone!

Deconstruction Reconstructed Exhibition covering page
An exhibition in fulfilment of the requirements for a Diploma of Distial Photography by Helen McLeod

Helen helps us wrestle back control of our demolished city – taking us on a journey past our city’s older buildings. Some are under threat of demolition and susceptible to destruction and decay. Capturing them photographically, deconstructing and reconstructing them, giving them a surreal dimension, the buildings seem at times to defy physics. The photographs begin pre-dawn with sunrise ending with night fall as if over a day, the weather also changing – reflecting our climate as if there where four seasons in one day!

Come and take this visual journey with us at Central Library Peterborough from the 18th to the 25th of September.

Find out more on 2 Galleries Facebook and visit her at 2 Galleries.com.

“All Eyes” – Justin Cronin – WORD Christchurch

“All eyes” I sure will keep my eyes out for those “virals,” “flyers,” “slims” or “smokes”.

Signed copy of The City of Mirrors

Justin Cronin had us all eating out of his hand during his interview with local young adult author Karen Healey.

His motivation for writing his virals trilogy – still can’t bear to call them vampires – was his daughter Iris who was then something like 9 years old. A prodigious reader she had taken a look at his previous novels Mary and O’Neil and  The Summer Guest and pronounced them boring and wanted to read a book about a girl who saved the world! Each day they would cycle around Houston and talk about what would be in such a book. Through this process he lost his inner critic.

Iris has an audiographic memory (like a photographic memory but for sound) she would always know what chapter they where up to when returning to a book. She had lots of suggestions –  there would be a girl with red hair like her and she named the characters. There was only one rule about what would be in the book – it had to be interesting. After a while he realised his current novel wasn’t going so well and he had 30 pages of notes so he thought he’d write the first chapter and see if it went anywhere – and here we are ten years later with the last volume of the trilogy.

Justin Cronin and Karen Healey
An evening with Justin Cronin. WORD Christchurch event, supported by Hachette. The Piano. Thursday 15 September 2016. Flickr 2016-09-15-IMG_6021

An English professor at Rice University, his only rule for Iris at college is don’t take any creative writing courses I can do that. Now  publishing her own work it looks like dad has successfully taught her the family business although I don’t know who taught who …

Why vamps? They are the most interesting out of the four monsters in human form: Frankenstein, werewolves, vampires and zombies. Although I wonder if he forgot about yeti, and Karen was putting a great case for old-fashioned fairies. He excuses himself saying those other Vampire stories were not on his radar, at the time Twilight had only just come out.

At the heart of the vampire noir is the premise that immortality is a terrible state to reassure us that we would rather be human than live forever. He takes vamps and puts them into a new narrative and that’s what makes it interesting. Vamps but with a twist –  you’ve always got to bring something else in to make it interesting like a road trip and a viral epidemic. He was inspired by a couple of B grade movies one called Near Dark directed by the talented Kathryn Bigelow. It blended to the western narrative of a drifters story also Magic Johnson had just come out and there was the AIDs epidemic.

Justin’s not averse to a bit of vampire seduction but in a different way, a seduction utilising rhetoric. Fanning as the charismatic narrator, Fanning sitting around for all those years in a library reading books using language to seduce Amy. A rhetorical seduction to make us feel sympathy with him.

On characters and community

  • Since you are running for your life what is the one thing you would carry with you? In most cases people would carry someone else, therefore you have a love story and bonds of community.
  • Survival is not sufficient. We read end of the world stories for reassurance and resurrection is an important part of that.
  • You need survivors to have hope for their children. You think what does it mean to have a child? A child is a deal you make with the future.

Describing the novels as an apocalyptic western road trip,  part of the inspiration for The Passage trilogy was the depressing world events at the time. Hurricane Katrina had just hit, G.W. Bush had been re-elected and a second less known Hurricane Rita had triggered an evacuation of Houston which he found himself in the midst of.

One morning stuck on the motorway at 2 am going nowhere in a massive traffic jam watching the fuel gauge go down he did the maths and decided they weren’t going to make it out and made a u-turn and headed back home. Luckily the main force of the hurricane hit further off than predicted.

He is interested in the response of community to disasters like the Christchurch earthquake how community survives. Community is a social lifeboat with a group of mostly good people who are resilient.

Why Mirrors

“The vampires can’t see themselves in the mirror and after a certain age that is the case with everybody”.

On making things creepy

I look to nature things that creep me out like fish why do they all turn the same way like that? Crickets how they can jump so much further than their body length, the virals are like bugs in hives.

On imagination

He deliberately doesn’t describe the virals too much leaving it to you to bring the things that scare you to your picture of them. Everyone’s picture of a viral would be different. That’s why movies can be disappointing and on that topic he has sold the film rights but it may be a TV show will eventuate. TV shows are now where the story is at not so many special effects.

Favourite things

Watching The walking dead and The Americans.

What drives him crazy

When the guns don’t run out of ammo on The Walking dead, and cars start whose batteries would have gone for years and the tyres aren’t flat. You have to think these things through.

Justin Cronin and Karen Healey
An evening with Justin Cronin. WORD Christchurch event, supported by Hachette. The Piano. Thursday 15 September 2016. Flickr 2016-09-15-IMG_6032

An Hour with Dame Fiona Kidman – WORD Christchurch

CoverFiona Kidman’s latest book All Day at the Movies explores what it means to be a woman in New Zealand. It’s an episodic novel  set over six decades. She explores where families were at and where they are going now.

Family is important to me as an only child I was often an observer looking in on families.

But she also says “I try not to put  my family into books”.

This novel was inspired by the sight of abandoned tobacco kilns.  Her father grew tobacco in KeriKeri and the memories of the Nicotiana scent drew her to setting her central character in the tobacco field of Motueka. The novel features a lot of pregnancies – as Owen Marshall observes, some more welcome than others.  One of her characters doesn’t know who her father is.

Fiona acknowledges pregnancy is a huge issue in women’s lives. She is an adoptive mother herself, and  acknowledges adoption was not handled well in the past.  Recently her novels are set around a central historical character – but in this novel she wanted to say something about politics, how decisions made in Wellington affect people’s lives.

Fiona has always been a political animal. She was part of the 1981 Springbok tour movement as explored in her novel Beside the Dark Pool. Exploring the social context her characters inhabit over the decades gives her a vehicle to say something about how Wellington decisions affect their lives.

Dame Fiona Kidman in interview with Own Marshall
Dame Fiona Kidman in interview with Owen Marshall

Looking at her characters as they deal with illegitimacy, estrangement, and abuse you may think she has a negative view of life and of men. But she says “I love men”. There are at least 5 positive men in the book, even though it may not seem that men come out well.

“I have had a lucky life” one of her characters says in the novel (and she observes it of her own life) which ends on an optimistic note. She looks at the circumstances of her characters and why things happen without making judgments. Authentic characters are important – how real people deal with things and how it affects them in 20, 30, 40 years time. Her characters become very real to her – they stand at the kitchen bench and come for rides with her in the car. By the time she sits down to write a novel they have their own voice which has to be listened to. Sometimes she is ready to let them go after a novel, and sometimes they don’t want to go away and reappear in another form like her character Jessie Sandal from Songs of the Violet Café.

Fiona has always been a feminist writer as is evident in  A breed of Women. She sees herself not as a woman’s writer but a writer writing for women. She first thought of herself as a writer as a 22-year-old in the 1960s. It was in an era when it was embarrassing to be pregnant. She had worked at Rotorua Library and moved to Rotorua High School library when she married her husband who also worked there. When she got pregnant, students remarked “Got her up the duff eh Sir!”, leading to a request for her to leave the school. Such were the expectations of the era.

She left and started writing – submitting a play for a competition. Her play evoked the comment that it must have been written by the dirtiest minded young woman in New Zealand.

I felt I did know stuff about being a woman that a middle-aged man in Wellington seemed not to know.

Fiona often struggled with expectations:

What am I doing sitting at the kitchen table, buying the kids clothes not preserving hundreds of jars and doing this.

She worked as a secretary of PEN and the NZ Book Council and hoped to help authors think of writing as working.

Her favourite genre is short stories but they don’t sell a lot of books and she loves poetry but working in other genres is necessary. She made as much money working in television in a month as writing in a couple of years.

  • Through working in television, she learnt to see as you would through the camera
  • through radio work she learn to listen especially to the silences
  • through journalism she learnt to ask questions

All have been useful in her writing work.  Poetry is not so much thinking about the audience more spontaneous.

Unsuitable Friends signed Signed by Fiona Kidman
Signed after all these years

Read more about Fiona Kidman from her official websiteThe Academy of New Zealand Literature, The New Zealand Book Council, and  Penguin Press.

Find books by Fiona Kidman in our collection.

WORD Christchurch

Canadian Tales with Elizabeth Hay – WORD Christchurch

Here’s some audience questions from the session with author Elizabeth Hay at the WORD Christchurch Writers and Readers Festival.

On writing

Canadian Elizabeth Hay has to write about what means most to her. In her latest book  His whole life, she writes of the close mother-son bond. As the marriage comes apart, the mother-son bond deepens. In her earlier novel Late nights on air she revisits her years as “An old radio hack”.

On the publishing scene

New Zealand authors will sympathize with her comments that publishers aren’t always aware how much Canadians interested in Canadian tales. Publishers want books to be set outside Canada with an eye to foreign sales.

Elizabeth Hay, Image supplied.
Elizabeth Hay, Image supplied.

On Trudeau

“He knows he’s not the smartest guy in the world” unlike Harper. He’s done some things like the Montreal Gay Pride march, does he overdo it? – Sometimes. Under former president Harper, Canada was very tar oil sands orientated. Under Trudeau it is different – landscape and environment is at the heart of the country now.

On the landscape

You can’t live in Canada without having a sense of it because there is so much of it and a need of landscape which is at the heart of our writing”.

Read a biography of Elizabeth Hay on her official website.
Have you read her books what would you like to ask her?

IMG_2002[1]

Elizabeth Hay appears in:
Canadian Tales: Elizabeth Hay, Fri 26 Aug, 12.30pm
About a Boy, Sat 27 Aug, 1.45pm

Find books by Elizabeth Hay in our collection.

WORD Christchurch

Take your pick of the best at WORD Christchurch

There is nothing like a book festival, the chance to luxuriate in an atmosphere charged with language, bathing your senses in rich text, balm to your soul.

At WORD Christchurch the words come flying off the page during readings, you will hear the inspiration behind your favourite authors work, you’ll be inspired to try new genres, enjoy poetry and become informed on global issues.

Book covers
WORD Christchurch related reading

So many authors will be present at this ear’s wonderful WORD Christchurch programme there is something for everyone but for me two sessions leapt off the programme’s pages. An hour with Dame Fiona Kidman our own literary giant and An evening with Justin Cronin and for someone new I have selected Canadian Tales: Elizabeth Hay. You may think a diverse choice but for me they are all powerful writers who hold you enthralled to the very end.

Fiona Kidman_c_Robert Cross_2
Fiona Kidman (photo credit: Robert Cross)

A little 1988 yellowed hard-covered copy of Unsuitable Friends has adorned my book shelf for many decades. It was my introduction to Dame Fiona Kidman’s work. Her characters struggle to free themselves from domestic constraints to achieve their dreams and to keep their moral compass. It is almost as if she is writing for her daughter who would be a contemporary of mine, as would she be of my mother. The book seemed written just for young women like me.

I remember arguments on the role of women in the house, Dad asserting that going to work had given my mother funny ideas! It was refreshing to read such vivid contemporary women’s fiction. No wonder she won the New Zealand Book Award for fiction that year.

Her urging of her female protagonists to not be bound by the constraints of their circumstance continued in her 2013 novel The Infinite Air about the enigmatic Jean Batten and in this year’s release All Day at the Movies. I can’t wait to get my hands on it. The outsider status of these characters is what appeals to me and it is this that also appeals in Justin Cronin’s writing.

Justin Cronin - Photo credit Julie Soefer
Justin Cronin (photo credit: Julie Soefer)

Man’s responsibility to use scientific discovery to the benefit of the planet as well as humanity, and the need to look to technology to solve man-made environmental problems is a big theme at this conference. Justin Cronin’s apocalyptic trilogy about an escaped laboratory virus fits right in here.

Not one to usually read a vampire tale I started reading The Passage as a read-a-like for Cormac McCarthy’s The Road. It was some time before I realized I was reading a vampire novel but not like any you have ever read. It’s a rip roaring yarn with fear and violence and with a cautionary back story.

I am saving the end of this trilogy till I can reread the first two, there are so many back plots and references I want to read them all back to back. If you are a Game of Thrones fan you’ll love it.

Elizabeth Hay
Elizabeth Hay (image supplied)

For my last pick I wanted an author I knew nothing about and comparisons to Margaret Atwood and Annie Proulx mean she has got to be good, so I chose Elizabeth Hay. I’ve just started her much praised coming of age tale, His whole life, and it’s making me thirsty to read more. This Canadian has a lovely laid back style which entrances you and keeps you spellbound.

So why not make some picks of your own and join the party at WORD Christchurch.

More WORD Christchurch

Inclusion Matters

Inclusion matters posterWe all think we know what it means to have different capacities than everyone else to do everyday tasks… but do we really understand?

Ask yourself who you see when you think of somebody who has an impairment, a disability, someone who is differently abled?

Do you see a wheelchair, a crutch, a cane? Somebody who has a carer with them?

Or do you see somebody who looks just like you, who goes about their day just like you?

Nearly a quarter of the adult New Zealand population (21 percent) identifies in some way as disabled and for people over the age of 65 it increases to over half the population (59 percent) according to the Disability Survey for 2013. I don’t know about you but I don’t see all that many wheelchairs, crutches and canes. Most impairments are hidden. We may not notice them in everyday interactions. We need to be aware of the needs of others.

Just because you do not wear glasses and have no cane doesn’t mean you can see. You can be functionally blind but able to see just enough to navigate into and around buildings but unable to read signs and fill out forms or use self-service points. Somebody without a wheelchair or crutches may have muscular weakness which leaves them unable to stand for any length of time and unable to lift and carry luggage, groceries or shop purchases.

What do we do when we see somebody struggling?  Do we assume they are fine struggling on by themselves? Do we ask if they need help?

Better still do we build our buildings and service points with everyone in mind?

You may say we do we bear in mind wheelchair access by having light switches at a lower height and ramps but have they been test driven by someone in a wheelchair before your business opened? Only then will you know if you have thought of all the barriers and are truly barrier free. Do not forget it only takes one link in the chain to break to make all your efforts in vain.

On the 3rd of December it is International Day of Persons with Disabilities. Time to include everyone because inclusion matters. We subtly exclude people when we focus on the impairment and not the ability. How can we support people to continue living their lives fully in society?

Have you ever seen people ignore somebody and talk to the person they came with? Would you like being spoken about as if you where not really there?

You may think you would never ignore somebody in this way but if you do not give consideration to everyone when you plan services, websites and buildings you are in effect ignoring and excluding a large part of the population. With that in mind Christchurch City Libraries strives to serve everyone. Let us know how we can improve and serve you better by contacting us.

Accessibility tips

Check out our page on help in using the library where you can find out about captioned DVDs, large print and talking books as well as our eResources including eBooks where you can change the font size. If you want help with using our library eResources come along to one of our computer drop in sessions.

New technologies especially in the field of communications have come a long way but not everyone has access to them. Mobile phones can help with vision impairments as an installed magnifying glass app can be a great help. Our library computers for public use also have some accessibility tools installed.

I have a tip for searching our library catalogue. Did you know you can search the catalogue for accessible formats?

Click on ‘Search’Search Button

Select ‘Accessible Formats’ from the  ‘All Formats’ dropdown list.

Select ‘Keyword’.

Enter your search word e.g. Lee Child, then click on the magnifying glass magnifying glass icon

Screenshot of catalogue search

Can you recommend any other useful apps or tips to help?

For more library resources about accessibility check out:

United Nations accessibility resources:

Never too old to learn

Cover of The Mature Student's handbookDo you envy those with a bit of paper from university? Do you think “If I had the chance I could do that”?

Did you try university when you were younger and wonder if you could give it another try?

Are you are over 55 years of age and have not studied for the last five years? If you are you can apply for the Deans Award which will pay half of your fees.

Stepping Stones A Guide for Mature-aged Students at University Book coverHave you always had an interest in Greek myths or Medieval Europe, or wished you had learnt Māori or French at school? Do you want to read the great works of English or find out about Picasso? Do you want to explore what makes science good bad or bogus or discuss god and human freedom determinism then the University of Canterbury have the course for you.

If you want you can study for as little as one semester and take on subject or you could study for a year and get a Certificate of Proficiency in that course or courses. If you want to take a few courses and study part-time without studying for a degree you can get a Certificate in Arts. There are further options of a Certificate in Languages or Te Pourua Reo: Diploma in Languages (Te Reo Māori) for those who do not wish to complete a full degree or if you decide you can complete a Bachelor of Arts. You can even select your own programme of study with the help of a Student advisor.

If you need to speak to somebody who studied at University as an older student then I have the chap for you. Dr. Jefferey Paparoa Holman from UC Arts Lifelong Learning would be happy to talk to you about his experiences of starting out late in life on a university degree.

Mature students their life experience to their course of study bringing a whole new perspective to classes. Mature students are motivated and know how to work and apply themselves they give their experience to society. University life now has much more support for students than in the past and you do not have to buy as many books as much is available online.

How to study again book cover

Have I perked your interest? Have a look at our library resources on how to study again and studying in New Zealand as a mature student.

Are you or have you studied as a mature student? Share your story with us.

Four reasons to join a Library Book Group

Did you know there are many Book Discussion Scheme book clubs meeting once a month in different libraries all over town?

One good reason to join a book group you get to meet new people. Many book groups start with a group of already established friends but there is much to be said for joining a group of people from different backgrounds – your book list will reflect diverse interests.  Another reason –  you will read books you don’t normally read. Some books you’ll love and some you may leave you conflicted. Did I like that? Is that really how people behave? Does the author really bring a true account of the period? Are the characters rendered realistically? We learn and grow in knowledge and what better place to do that than in a library. Every second Wednesday of the month our Central Library Peterborough book group meets at midday.

The Madonnas of Leningrad book cover The Mermitage 250 Masterworks Shostakovich Symphony No. 7 Leningrad cover

This month’s title The Madonnas of Leningrad is all about the Siege of Leningrad through the eyes of Marina, a guide at the State Hermitage Museum. It become clear her children have never understood this period of her life which has shaped the person she is. We see how much is hidden inside ourselves. You would think a book about the dehumanizing effects of war would be depressing yet it shows the resilience of mankind and the importance of finding beauty to the human spirit.

As her granddaughter looks to her future and prepares to marry. Marina is spending more and more time in her past due to the ravages of Alzheimers. She begins to rediscover the world seeing it anew as a child might, everthing new and wondrous. Borrow The Madonnas of Leningrad yourself or download an eBook  from Overdrive, take a look at the Hermitage’s masterpieces and listen to Shostokovich’s Seventh Symphony which was composed during the siege from our Naxos Music Library and read Sarah Quigley’s The Conductor inspired by these events. There’s plenty more to read if you like Russian historical fiction or you might like Still Alice for another novel exploring what it means to have Alzheimers (it is also available as an Overdrive eBook).

The Crimson Rooms book coverIf evenings are more your thing, every second Tuesday of the month our group meets at six o’clock at Central Library Peterborough. This month we are reading The Crimson Rooms by Katherine McMahon set just after World War One as women’s roles are changing. The main character is a feisty lady lawyer is juggling the demands of family against her independence. This detective novel is a good clean read.

Last month we read A Guide to the Birds of East Africa, a veA Guide to the birds of East Africary Alexander McCall Smith-like novel on ethics of competition and courtship. This book is a real treat with a great insight to human behaviour. Even if you are no avid bird watcher you may find you are intrigued to find out more about the birds of Africa to see if these birds truly caricature some of these characters! Listen to their calls while reading for something really atmospheric from our Smithsonian Global Sounds for libraries.

Why not join our book group at Central Library Peterborough or look for book groups and author events on our calendar at other libraries around the city.

Do you belong to a library book club? What are you reading this month?

Festival made accessible

Catalogue search for Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami in audiobook formatAbout now you may be wondering what happened to your good intentions of reading all those interesting books by those fascinating authors you heard about at WORD Christchurch or missed out on hearing at Auckland Writers Festival. Never fear, a solution is near!

Listen to your festival favourites

You may have not enough hours in the day to sit by the fire and read your fill of festival authors but help is at hand. You need not miss out on this year’s Auckland festival headliner Haruki Murakami. Try listening to his work in an audiobook. We have him available in downloadable audiobook from Overdrive and on CD.

Catalogue search for Hard-boiled wonderland and the end of the world by Haruki Murakami i n audiobook formatFill in your spare moments on the bus or in the car, or while you vacuum the house, rake the leaves or paint the fence, or while exercising the dog or yourself by listening to an audiobook. If you have had a particularly tiring day and find you’re too tired to read, rather than turning on the television, snuggle up in a chair with an audiobook and soon you will be relaxed. Having trouble sleeping? My mother swears by lulling English voices as a sure-fire cure for insomnia.

Often audiobooks and large print titles have no reserve list so while others are waiting for a print edition, get ahead of the crowd. Better still, even if there is a wait list downloadable audiobooks on Overdrive do not have a reserve charge.

Catalogue search for H is for Hawke by Helen MacDonald in audiobook formatOverdrive is one of our suppliers of audiobooks and ebooks. You can find all their titles in our catalogue.

As well as Murakami, you might also try Booker Prize-winning novelist Ben Okri whose novel The Age of Magic has been newly released and is available on CD. Sometimes the CD format can be limiting as it requires you to be stationary. Happily we have Helen MacDonald’s H is for Hawk as an ISIS audiobook that is a clever format which you can download to your laptop and transfer to your MP3 player, freeing you up to listen to it anywhere.

The thousand autumns of Joseph de Zoet in audiobook formatA standout from Word Christchurch was the charming David Mitchell. Your ears can ring with the sounds and atmosphere of old Japan listening to his exotic enthralling tale The thousand autumns of Jacob de Zoet on CD.

 

 

Large print – easy to read!

If reading is difficult at night when the light is bad, or because you struggle with print at the end of a tiring day spent staring at a computer screen, large print may be the answer! Why not try David Mitchell’s Black Swan Green or The Thousand Autumn’s of Joseph de Zoet or Xinran’s touching Miss Chopsticks.

Walliams in audio and large print formats

Book cover for Demon Dentist by David Walliams in Playaway formatNothing like a bedtime story so why not borrow one of our children’s titles by the hit author David Walliams in an audiobook format to lull your darlings to sleep? We have audiobooks on CD, preloaded mp3 players, and downloadable audiobooks for your enjoyment.

If you have a child who is yet to find their stride with reading a wonderful way to introduce the love of books is by reading along to an audiobook so why not borrow the book and the audiobook together? We have Demon Dentist as a Playaway, a preloaded audiobook in its own wee player. All you or your child has to do is press play and you can carry it around with you. Ideal for children who are always on the move.

If small print is an obstacle try these David Walliams titles in large print.

Catalogue search for Mr Stink by David Walliams in large printCatalogue search for Ratburger by David Walliams in large print formatThe boy in the dress by David Walliams in Large Print format

More festival goodies