I hear dead people – Rock’s Back Pages

No, I am not a psychic, I have been listening to dead musicians. Big deal you say, you can hear dead musicians all the time by turning on the radio or just listening to some of the music on Spotify. What I have been listening to is audio interviews of musicians on Rock’s Back Pages, (there are also audio interviews with musicians who are still alive, if listening to people beyond the grave is not your thing).

Here’s my list of audio interviews from Rock’s Backpages (all deceased)

Rock’s Back Pages has a huge variety of articles from heaps of different music publications like New Musical Express (NME), Real Groove and Rolling Stone. You will find artists (both dead and alive) like Ella Fitzgerald, Lorde, Joy Division and the White Stripes and so much more. Check out this fantastic eResource – it’s like going through a record collection in a second hand store, you never know what you will find.

Bloomsbury Popular Music

We are proud to present our newest eResource Bloomsbury Popular Music. This eResource has a huge amount of information on music from 1900 to present. It includes all eleven volumes of Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Popular Music of the World, over 120 titles of the widely acclaimed 33 1/3 series, and an expanding collection of scholarly titles.

Use it to:

  • Explore the historical origins and cultural impact of popular music from almost every country in the world;
  • Discover more about influential artists and albums, and local music scenes and subcultures;
  • Learn about everything from musical form and instruments to the workings of the music industry;
  • Research the social, political and economic context of different musical genres.

Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Popular Music

The Encyclopaedia of Popular Music of the World, over 20 years in the making, is a landmark reference work in its field. Each volume, authored by top contributors from around the world, includes discussions on cultural, historical and geographic origins; technical musical characteristics; instrumentation and use of voice; lyrics and language; typical features of performance and presentation; historical development and paths and modes of dissemination; influence of technology, the music industry and political and economic circumstances; changing stylistic features; notable and influential performers; and relationships to other genres and sub-genres.

33 1/3 Series

33 1/3 is a series of short books about popular music, focusing on individual albums by artists ranging from James Brown to Celine Dion and from J Dilla to Neutral Milk Hotel. Each album covered in the series occupies a specific place in music history, so each book-length treatment takes an individualized approach. 33 1/3 is widely acclaimed by fans, musicians, and scholars alike.

 

Scholarly books on Popular Music Studies

The Bloomsbury Popular Music Studies list consists of an expanding range of scholarly books ranging from edited volumes to biographies to historical overviews, and that span genres, including rock, pop, hip hop, and punk. Titles include and David Boucher’s Dylan and Cohen, James Braxton Peterson’s Hip Hop Headphones and Kevin Dunn’s Global Punk.

The Killers bring Vegas to Christchurch

On Tuesday night at a sold out Horncastle Arena, the Killers took the stage in the most spectacular, Vegas-style fashion. They started off with their first single Mr Brightside (cue several audience members paying up on their bet that this would be the last number), the audience got to their feet, and remained there for the rest of the night. Immediately after, the arena went dark, a fantastic show of lights began, and the band launched into a fantastic repertoire of old favourites’ like ‘Human’, and ‘Read My Mind’, along with some great new songs such as ‘The Man’ and ‘Run For Cover’.

Brandon Flowers owned the stage, firstly in a fabulous pink jacket, then in the most glittering of gold suits that Elvis himself would have envied. If you were worried you wouldn’t be able to hear the show over the loud suits – never fear. Brandon Flowers voice was as powerful and on form as ever.

He was also backed up with a great band including 2 guitarists, a bassist, a drummer, and 3 backing vocals. To be very technical about it, the noise was loud, and the Killers sounded bigger and better than ever. There were some great touches of flamboyancy too with giant confetti and streamers pouring from the ceiling at a couple of opportune moments. The band seemed to be stoked to be there, and Brandon Flowers smiled, pranced, and made love to us all. He said it had taken fourteen years for the band to get to Christchurch but assured us  it wouldn’t take that long again. The entire audience will no doubt hold him to that.

The programme was truly packed, and pauses for applause were very small, almost as though the band were worried we wouldn’t applaud. There was a nice hat tip to Kiwi music, with a rendition of ‘Don’t Dream It’s Over’ and the band went out with a true bang, on ‘All These Things That I’ve Done’.

Not all of the Killers were there as guitarist Dave Keuning has left touring to spend more time with his family, and bassist Mark Stoermer has likewise paused touring to take up study (as my brother in law observed, this is ‘in true rock star fashion’). How unusual is it to hear of rock stars halting their careers not for rehab reasons but rather for study and their bubs? This is just another reason to love this band. Brandon Flowers in particular just comes across as a heck of a nice guy, thrilled to bits that you’re having a good time.

If you’re gutted you missed the concert, well, this blog probably hasn’t helped. Happily though, the library does have plenty of Killers albums you can borrow, and like Brandon Flowers said, it won’t take fourteen years for the group to come back. Judging by the love for Brandon Flowers bursting from fans on Tuesday night, the group are no doubt aware that Christchurch has already started the countdown.

Auē! Me tangi noa ahau ki muri nei

My grandfather’s brother never came back from World War One. He’s buried in Armentières, France. My grandmother’s brother lost his leg, so the family farm in Southland had to be sold – he couldn’t take up his inheritance. My great aunt’s fiancé returned a shell-shocked alcoholic – PTSD, they’d call it these days. They parted and she never married.

In the retellings of the larger stories of war it is often these vignettes of personal loss, the consequences felt by loved ones, that speak quietly but with a universal relatability.

I found myself thinking of those members of my family, and the war that changed their lives, when listening to the beautiful lament E Pari Rā.

Written by Paraire Tomoana (Ngāti Kahungunu and Ngāti Te Whatu-i-āpiti leader) for his relative, kuia Maku-i-te-Rangi Ellison, E Pari Rā gives a lasting voice to her pain and grief over the loss of her son Whakatomo Ellison, who died in the battle of the Somme. Its beautiful metaphor for grief as the surging tide is both deeply personal, and universal.

E pari rā

E pari rā e ngā tai ki te ākau. / The tides surge onto the seashore
E hotu rā ko taku manawa. / with each throb of my heart.
Auē! Me tangi noa / Alas! Weeping without restraint
Ahau i muri nei / for I am left behind, 
Te iwi e he ngākau tangi noa. / everyone is utterly heart-broken.

Tēnā rā! Tahuri mai! / So please come back, return
E te tau! te aroha. / my beloved, my love
Tēnei rā ahau te tangi nei. / I weep here
Mōhou kua wehea nei. / for you now far away
Haere rā! mahara mai. / Farewell! And remember, 
E te tau! kia mau ki au. / Beloved! Be true to me
Haere rā! ka tūturu ahau. / Farewell! I will be true to you
Haere Rā! / Farewell!

Haere rā e tama / Farewell young man
Haere rā. / Farewell.
Haria rā te aroha i ahau / Take my love with you
Auē! Me tangi noa / Alas! Tears fall
Ahau ki muri nei / as I am left behind here
Te iwi e he ngākau tangi noa. / the hearts of your people weep openly

Find out more

Record Store Day – Saturday 21 April 2018

Record Store Day is on this Saturday 21 April. It is an annual international event designed to celebrate the record store as a community. For more info, read Russell Brown’s Friday Music post The Shopping news and What’s happening for Record Store Day across NZ, this Saturday? Peter McLennan on Dub dot dash.
Here is our compilation of what’s happening here in Ōtautahi.

What’s on in Christchurch

Galaxy Records

Galaxy Records on 336 St Asaph St are an “Indie Institution’ in Christchurch, selling new and used vinyl. Like Galaxy Records on Facebook.
Record Store Day at Galaxy Records: Subscribe to the Facebook event
Rare & Collectable goodies! Featuring DJs: Pinacolada Soundsystem , Missy G & Skew-whiff from midday. Darkroom Bar will be open

Lyttelton Records

Lyttelton Records have spilled out of their home recording studio to open a shop (and bar) in Woolston. You can buy merch here, guitar strings and maybe catch a live performance. Like Lyttelton Records on Facebook.
Record Store Day at Lyttelton Records: Vinyl discounts, live music, happy hour 12pm to 4pm 650 Ferry Road

Penny Lane Records

If you are a record store fan in Christchurch, you can visit Penny Lane Records – they are at Eastgate Mall in Linwood, and in Sydenham at 430 Colombo Street. Penny Lane specialise in great quality second-hand music formats and collectibles. Like Penny Lane Records on Facebook.
Record Store Day at Penny Lane Records: The crew were cagey as to what’s happening – so there might be some good surprises on offer. What they did say was they are open at 8am, there will be Record Store Day exclusives available, and stuff happening for customers, as well as specials.

(here’s a pic from RSD 2017 at Penny Lane)

Sadhana Surf and House of Creativity

Sadhana Surfboards is at Shop 52 at The Tannery, 3 Garlands Road Woolston. Like Sadhana Surf on Facebook

sadhana
Sadhana Surfboards

Another hot tip for record fans: Vinyl Cafe at 24b Essex Street is a must visit for vinyl lovers. Like Vinyl Cafe on Facebook,

Get on down to your local record shop, buy yourself some vinyl to spin while the weather goes wild. Talk to people who appreciate quality music. Who knows you may make a new connection…

Record Appreciation – Fee

I love records! I still have a halfway decent collection of records. When I had to replace my stereo a few years back, I made sure it came with a turntable. I’m a purist – like Neil Young I can hear more depth and texture of sound in an LP (Long Player), than I can on a CD or a download. Neil developed PonoMusic to develop modern sound recording formats that delivered quality of sound almost as good as the studio, or the original record. (See Waging Heavy Peace, one of Neil’s engaging autobiographies.)

Other bands and artists such as Iron Maiden and New Zealand’s Shayne P. Carter, have steadfastly resolved to continue releasing albums on vinyl as well as other formats. Shayne P. Carter has been heard to lament the difficulty of reducing sleeve artwork to fit CD cases. I sure as heck can’t read the release date on CDs, and most won’t tell you when the original album was recorded. The discussion about sound continues…

Did you know that you can still buy turntables? I’ve discovered them at The Warehouse, The Listening Post (330 St Asaph Street), the Top Hi-Fi Shop (35 Carlyle St, Sydenham), and Soundline Audio (329 Madras St), Harvey Norman and JB Hi-Fi.

Now to put the record collection in alphabetical order

Record Store Day resources

Vinyl and music at the library

Fee and Donna
Vinyl appreciators

Easter Parade 2018

Firstly, some important Easter essentials:

Libraries

  • Library Easter hours: All libraries are closed on Good Friday 30 March and Easter Monday 2 April, but open as normal on Saturday 31 March and Sunday 1 April. The only exception is Linwood Library, which isn’t open on Easter Sunday. Also note there is a scheduled outage on Easter Monday 2 April from 5am to approximately 12pm that will affect your access to the catalogue and eResources.

Daylight Saving

Fall back! Daylight saving ends when clocks go back by 1 hour at 3am on Sunday 1 April.

Rubbish

  • Rubbish collection: If your regular collection day is Good Friday 30 March, your collection day will now be Saturday 31 March. Kerbside collection continues as normal on Easter Monday.

Buses

  • Metroinfo Bus services: On Public Holidays bus and ferry services run to weekend timetables:
    • Thursday 29 March runs to the Friday timetable
    • Good Friday 30 March runs to the Sunday timetable
    • Easter Sunday 1 April runs to the Sunday timetable
    • Easter Monday 2 April runs to the Saturday timetable

Librarian Picks

And here is what our librarians are reading/watching/doing/listening to this Easter – it’s a veritable Easter Parade!

Simone

I have always wanted to slip Gregorian Chants into a blog. Naxos has 2 playlists for Easter:

Some Easter eMagazines on RBDigital Magazines:

Andrew

Theme song for your Easter Parade:

Ray

Philip Reeves – Mortal Engines Series
A few days off is an ideal opportunity to revisit a series – I picked this one because I just discovered the teaser trailer for the film adaptation they’re making! A futuristic dystopia of mechanical cities chasing each other across the wastelands…I loved it when I was 13 and I hope I’ll still love it now.

CoverSnuggle and Play Crochet Carolina Guzman Benitez
Maybe a long weekend will mean I finally get around to finishing the adorable monkey I’ve been crocheting from this book…

Simon

My pick is, Milk of the Tree, An Anthology of Female Vocal Folk and Singer-songwriters 1966-73
Easter seems the perfect time to dig into this mammoth 60 song set. An interesting mix of American and British artists with a whole heap of interesting rarities and a few classics. The detailed notes are also well worth a read.

Theresa

I’m doing the following over Easter:

CoverCoverCover

Karen G

Ferrymead Park is having a Great Easter Egg Hunt on Sunday 1 April.

The Canterbury Folk Festival is on for those wanting to head out of town – 30 March to 2 April

Moata

CoverCake wrecks 
Short, fun and full of sugar, Cake wrecks is hilarious and easily digestible. Marvel at the wonky spelling and bad frosting choices of so-called baking professionals.

Kate M

I’m looking forward to a rainy few days where I can get through a few new YA books.

CoverCoverCover

  • Projekt 1065 – With so many great YA books out there dealing with WWII (check out Max for a hard-hitting book about Hitler’s quest to create a master Aryan race), I’m looking forward to reading this one about a 13-year-old British spy in Berlin in 1943.
  • I am not your perfect Mexican daughter – I learnt a lot reading Sherman Alexei’s The absolutely true diary of a part-time Indian, I’m interested to find out more about the Mexican culture with this book.
  • Piecing me together – Born from the #blacklivesmatter movement, books like The Hate You Give and Dear Martin deal with the issue of race in current-day United States. To counter ‘white privilege’, schools offer programmes to their ‘at risk’ students, and this book is about what happens when those ‘at risk’ students just want to be one of the crowd. I’m looking forward to it.

Masha

CoverAli Smith: Winter
Long awaited second novel in the Seasonal quartet – about the season that teaches us survival, inspired by Dickens’s A Christmas Carol.

Donna

Cover

I have the super popular bestseller The woman in the window by A.J. Finn at home, and want to spend some time losing myself in a psycho thriller (qu’est-ce que c’est).

My Easter eMagazines from RBDigital Magazines:

Kim

We’re off to the Peter Rabbit movie but also the A Wrinkle in Time advance screening is on Palms Sun 1st April.
See also my booklist of recently published children’s books about Easter, eggs and bunnies

Win tickets to the NZSO Mozart & Mahler concert

Music lovers, take note!

TPicture of music noteshe New Zealand Symphony Orchestra’s 2018 season continues next month with a concert featuring works by Mozart and Mahler on Wednesday 11 April at Horncastle Arena.

International piano duo Christina and Michelle Naughton will perform Mozart’s Concerto for Two Pianos. The other piece performed for this concert will be Gustav Mahler’s Fifth Symphony. Composed in 1901, the beautiful Adagietto 4th movement is probably the most recognisable of Mahler’s compositions and has been played at significant events in history, including the funeral of Robert Kennedy. With its haunting strings and harp, it is Mahler’s love song to his wife, Alma.

We have 2 double passes to give away to library members. All you need to do is name the video eResource where you can find a 2004 performance of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 5 (the answer is in this blog post) and fill out the competition entry form. Entries close at 5pm on Tuesday, 3 April and winners will be announced on Wednesday 4 April.

Find out more

An Easter music egg-stravaganza!

Easter approaches and you find yourself with some extra time for contemplation, relaxation, and resetting your spiritual clock.

How best to do this?

Personally I find music the best avenue for transcendental experiences so I have created a list of different options to share, for your ears, eyes, and souls!

And here it is…

An Easter playlist

List created by DevilStateDan

Some Easter-y music to enjoy on the long weekend… We have a wide range of traditional and not-so-traditional music here on this list, so happy listening to you – there may even be an “easter-egg” to discover somewhere in this list!

Let’s begin on a lighter and fun note with Jimmy Wakely singing “Peter Cottontail”. This 1950 Song Reached #7 on Country Music Charts in America and is sure to get your foot tapping while you ready yourself for the Easter season.

Cover of St Matthew Passion, J. S. BachSt. Matthew Passion – The masterpiece of baroque music, first performed on Good Friday 1727 in Leipzig Germany. It’s the story of the crucifixion – as according to the bible – and features beautiful baroque choral singing and stunning solo arias. Make Good Friday a good Friday with this piece!

St. Matthew Passion – And if you’ve got some musical skills and can pull a group of singers and instrumentalists together, why not give the piece a go yourself! This score is for soloists (SATTBB), two mixed choruses (SATBSATB), and two orchestras. Christchurch City Libraries has a large print music selection available for you to borrow!

Symphony no. 2 – What can you say about Mahler No.2 ‘Resurrection’ Symphony other than it’s moody as heck, excites conductors to a frenzied end, includes the most magnificent ‘musical death shriek’, and is an eternal piece of brilliant composition. Listen and you’ll agree, but is it an Easter piece…? You decide!

Cover of Mahler documentary on Access VideoMahler (Documentary) – Want to know more about the crazy musical genius oddball Bohemian, Gustav Mahler? Try this documentary available to stream for free through your Christchurch City Libraries membership.

Le lamentazioni del profeta geremia per il mercoledi santo – Thomas Tallis is super-important in early music history and is celebrated as one of Britain’s greatest ever composers. He straddled the times of change as HenryVIII was revamping the church in the early 1500’s Tallis proved quite adept at pleasing both sides of the believers (catholic and protestant) both stylistically and exaltedly! Have a listen to his magnificent choral arrangements!

Eight Classic Albums – And here’s a surprise inclusion but I couldn’t resist – an Easter-Egg if you will! On one of these eight classic albums the great Gerry Mulligan meets the great Ben Webster – a coming together of jazz saxophone to play the tune; ’18 Carrots for Rabbit’. Happy Easter!

Handel’s Messiah – And to finish off lets watch a live performance of Handel’s Messiah – the mightiest of all Easter pieces!

^DevilStateDan

View Full List

eMagazines for your weekend – RBDigital Magazines

Here is a baker’s dozen of titles hot off the press from RBDigital Magazines. Perfect for a spot of weekend reading – on your laptop, desktop, phone, tablet …:

Cover Cover Cover Cover Cover Cover Cover Cover Cover Cover Cover

 

  1. Apple Magazine
  2. Vanity Fair
  3. Big League
  4. Evo
  5. Bon Appetit
  6. British Vogue
  7. New Zealand Listener
  8. Woman’s Day
  9. North and South
  10. Q
  11. Hello!
  12. Grazia
  13. Philosophy now

SPACifically PACific Polyfest Canterbury 2018

This Saturday I’ll be heading down to the former residential Red Zone in Dallington (on the corner of New Brighton Road & Locksley Ave) with my kids in tow, picnic, rug and chairs for the biggest annual specifically Pacific event this side of the Cook Strait. Saturday will see 730-odd performers from 19 secondary schools from Nelson College all the way down to Ashburton College take the stage to showcase the hours of hard work they have put in to refining every last movement and note.

Polyfest 2018 school performance times

This event has grown from strength to strength in the past few years with the hard work of some very dedicated teachers, parents, volunteers and agencies. The Pasifika population holds the youngest median age in the diverse populations of New Zealand, so it is best fitting that our Pasifika youth celebrate this on stage.

For a taste of what to expect you can view videos of performances from previous Polyfests on YouTube.

Make your way down to the red zone and expect to have your senses assaulted as you witness the graceful movement, rhythmic drums, enticing scent of warm coconut buns and chop suey, and the “chee-hoo!” of Pasifika celebration. Check out the performance order to make sure that you don’t miss out on your favourite group!

Find out more

Jan-Hai Te Ratana
South Learning Centre