Podcast – Suffrage 125

Speak Up Kōrerotia logoChristchurch City Libraries blog hosts a series of regular podcasts from New Zealand’s only specialist human rights radio show Speak up – Kōrerotia. This show is created by Sally Carlton.

It is 125 years since New Zealand became the first country to allow women to vote in parliamentary elections. In this show, guests Vanisa Dhiru (National President of the National Council of Women of New Zealand), Katie Pickles (Historian of Women’s and Feminist History at the University of Canterbury) and Kym Hamilton (Tokona Te Raki) ponder the history of suffrage in Aotearoa New Zealand, as well as the current state of women’s rights in the country. This show is proudly supported by the Ministry for Women’s Suffrage 125 Community Fund.

  • Part I: Brief overview of the Suffrage movement in Aotearoa New Zealand; who exactly was entitled to vote following the 1893 Electoral Act
  • Part II: Women’s rights and challenges in NZ 125 years since Suffrage
  • Part III: The need for a gender-equal NZ; the need to look at gender beyond stereotypes and beyond the binary
  • Part IV: Hopes for the future

Transcript – Suffrage 125

Find out more in our collection

 Cover of Women's suffrage in New Zealand Cover of Women now: The legacy of female suffrage Cover of Unsung heroines Cover of Leading the way Cover of Be counted! Cover of Polly Plum Cover of The suffragists Cover of Women's suffrage in New Zealand Cover of Canterbury women since 1893 Cover of Class, Gender and the Vote Historical Perspectives From New Zealand Cover of Rethinking Women and Politics

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庆祝2018年新西兰中文周Celebrations in New Zealand Chinese Language Week 2018

New Zealand Chinese Language Week is a Kiwi-driven initiative aiming at encouraging New Zealanders to discover Chinese language and culture. It was officially launched by Raymond Huo as a sitting Member of Parliament on 24 May 2014. This year New Zealand Chinese Language Week is on from 23 to 29 September. Explore all the events in the nationwide celebration during New Zealand Chinese Language Week.

New Zealand Chinese Language Week Celebrations at Shirley and Hornby Libraries

Coincidentally, Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival on 24 September and Confucius’ Birthday on 28 September fall during this year’s New Zealand Chinese Language Week. Christchurch City Libraries is collaborating with the Confucius Institute at the University of Canterbury to celebrate the two events.

Shirley Library

Our activities include paper cutting, calligraphy, plate painting, Chinese games, Chinese folk dancing, and learning basic Chinese greeting and numbers. Free, no bookings required. Recommended for all ages. Caregiver required.

Hornby Library

Come and celebrate Chinese Language Week with us at Hornby Library. Lead teacher, Fang Tian from the Confucius Institute will run a Chinese calligraphy taster and Cherry Blossom painting session. Suitable for all ages. FREE, no bookings required. Wednesday 26 September, 3.30pm to 4.30pm. Find out more.

Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival中秋节

Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival is on the 15th day of the 8th month of a lunar calendar year when the moon is believed to the biggest and fullest. Chinese people believe that a full moon is a symbol of reunion, harmony and happiness so Mid-Autumn Festival is a time for family reunion. Mooncakes are the main characteristic food for this occasion. Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival was derived from the ancient rite of offering sacrifices to the sun in spring and to the moon in autumn. Folklore about the origin of the festival is based on the ancient legend of Chang’e and her fateful ascent to the heavens after having swallowed an elixir pill.

Books and resources in the library related to Mid-Autumn Festival 图书馆有关中秋节的读物

Confucius’ Birthday孔子诞辰

Confucius, also known as Kong Qiu, is a great Chinese scholar, teacher and social philosopher. Confucius is believed to be born on 28 September, 551BC. He was living in a period regarded as a time of great moral decline. Working with his disciples, Confucius edited and wrote the classics and compiled Four Books and Five Classics 四书五经 to find solutions. In his life time, Confucius traveled throughout eastern China to persuade the official classes and rulers of Chinese states with the great moral teachings of the sages of the past. Although Confucius did not succeed in reviving the classics, his teachings formed as a dominant Chinese ideology, known as Confucianism, which values the concepts of benevolence仁, ritual仪, propriety礼. His teachings have had a profoundly influence on Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Japanese thoughts and life for 2500 years.

Each year, Confucius’ birthday celebration ceremonies are held on the island of Qufu (Shangdong Province, Mainland China), the birthplace of Confucius. Outside Mainland China, Confucius’ birthday is also celebrated in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau, South Korea and Japan. In Taiwan, Confucius’ birthday is set as a public holiday for teachers, known as Teachers’ Day, to memorise the first great teacher in the Chinese history.

  

Books and resources on Confucius in the library 图书馆有关孔子的读物

Chinese Language Collection

Chinese eResources

  • Overdrive — Chinese language eBooks中文电子书
  • Dragonsource — Chinese language magazines龙源中文杂志
  • Press Reader — Chinese language newspaper and magazines 在线中文报纸和杂志

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Resources for Learning Chinese

Programmes and services offered in Chinese at your library

Hong Wang
Network Library Assistant

Podcast – Tā moko

Speak Up Kōrerotia logoChristchurch City Libraries blog hosts a series of regular podcasts from specialist human rights radio show Speak up – Kōrerotia. This show is created by Sally Carlton.

Tā moko – Māori tattoos – are enjoying a resurgence. Tā moko artist Chris Harvey, University of Canterbury lecturer Komene Kururangi and photographer Michael Bradley (whose recent ‘Puaki’ exhibition documents wearers of mataora and moko kauwae – facial tattoos) discuss this resurgence, as well as the reasons and responsibilities that come with deciding to wear such a visible sign of mātauranga Māori.

Part I: What is tā moko? How is it different to kirituhi (writing on the skin)? Who can wear moko? Why do people get moko?

Part II: Responsibilities that come with wearing and giving moko

Part III: Changing attitudes in Aotearoa towards moko; changing designs; likely continuing interest in moko in the future

Transcript – Tā moko

Mentioned in this podcast

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Cover of Mau moko Cover of New Zealand Tattoo Cover of Ancient Wisdom Modern Solutions The Inspirational Story of One Man's Quest to Become A Modern Day Warrior Cover of Moko Maori Tattooing in the 20th Century Cover of Moko Rangatira Māori Tattoo Cover of Moko Maori Tattooing in the 20th Century Cover of MataoraCover of Moko The Art and History of Maori TattooingCover of Ta Moko The Art of Maori Tattoo

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严歌苓小说中的伦理和女权 Ethical and feminist mentality in Geling Yan’s novels

去年底,当电影《芳华》在海内外引起很大反响时,大家再次关注原著及其作者严歌苓。严歌苓是最受华人读者喜爱的当代女性作家之一。她的作品备受大陆著名导演的青睐,被频频搬上荧幕。虽然侨居国外,她作品中的人物贴近大陆各个历史时期现实生活中的普通人。她笔下的女性角色不仅美丽、善良,而且有着深邃的个性和历史的复杂烙印。她在作品中呈现的对伦理和女权的视角往往引起读者对传统道德的思考和争议。

伦理是用于定义一件事在道德上的好坏和正误。对伦理的认知源于人类初期作为社会群体而制定的生存规则。在一个社会,伦理是道德标准的体系。不同的社会有不同的体系。在中国,源于老子的《道德经》和孔子有关君子的教诲形成了最基本的道德规范。古代儒家的《三从四德》对妇女一生的行为、修养和道德进行了要求和规定。近代的“五四”运动在科学和民主的旗帜下,提倡新道德和妇女解放。1949年后,法律保证妇女在政治经济、教育水平和婚姻家庭方面地位的提高,提倡男女平等。从历史的角度来看,关于妇女地位的伦理道德是从夫权到女权的演进。

然而,严歌苓的作品对这些不同时期规范妇女行为的礼教和道德却有其独特的诠释。《小姨多鹤》讲述日本少女多鹤在日本战败投降时作为被遗弃的殖民者被卖到东北一户人家,成了传宗接代的“工具”。她被安排成为自己所生孩子的小姨,以这一尴尬的身份与一位中国女人生活在同一个屋檐下,对同一个男人衍生出爱和依赖。在这部小说中,读者会看到旧道德和新道德在特殊年代下对多鹤命运的驱使和多鹤无选择的畸形爱恋的形成。读者可能会问道:这些伦理道德究竟为女性带来了什么?对这个问题,您可能会在《陆犯焉识》中找到一些答案。这是一部家族史小说。小说描写了主人公陆焉识在民国时留洋回国到文革时期的一生,是以作者祖父严恩春为原型。尽管小说围绕陆焉识的经历展开,其妻子冯婉喻演绎了一位符合传统道德礼教的贤妻良母形象。冯婉喻温婉而坚毅,她没有对包办婚姻的不满和风流倜傥丈夫的责备。尽管世事变迁,她对丈夫的爱恋、忠诚和顺从从未改变。她以三从四德为基准的付出换来了丈夫的浪子回头和爱。但她最终已经不能感知这份爱了。这本书的凄美使读者对传统道德下女性争取爱和被爱权利的方式感到困惑和惋惜。

如果说女权这一概念在多鹤和冯婉喻这样的传统女性形象中若影若现或无踪可寻,严歌苓在另外一些作品中围绕爱和性的道德和不道德,通过其塑造的众多女性角色对女权展开更深入的探寻。《天浴》是一个极端的例子。文革下乡的女知青文秀是一个单纯又充满朝气的女孩,为了回城的利益而出卖自己的身体和灵魂,逐渐迷失和泯灭。这部小说提出了一个尖锐的问题:我们是应该指责文秀用不道德的手段来获取回城的权利,还是那个道德泯灭的时代!《金陵十三钗》中一群做着“不道德”营生的妓女用自己的生命换回了女学生们的安全逃离被日本人占领的南京城。这群女人用最极致的方式在维护着民族的尊严。《花儿与少年》中女主人公晚江为了寻求物质上的幸福,和丈夫离婚并嫁到美国。当读者指责晚江的不道德时也会看到她周围每一个角色的猥琐。当一个女人用婚姻来换取权利而周围的人也坐收渔利时,所有的道德问题可能就不只是她一个人的问题了。《老师好美》讲述了一位36岁单身离异女班主任与两位花样少年在校园中演绎了一场隐秘而炽烈的不伦之恋。这部小说中的女主人公是严歌苓所有小说中备受责难的人物之一。不过,如果从女权主义的道德观来看,读者可能会理解女主人公是怎样地挣扎在关爱自己和关爱他人的矛盾中。这一矛盾是女权主义伦理学Feminist ethics最核心的问题。

严歌苓的小说吸引读者的地方在于她努力在作品中探讨人性的复杂性。如果您对严歌苓的小说感兴趣,在图书馆还可以找到她的其它小说。同时也欢迎您参加Fendalton图书馆的读书会分享您的读后感。我们每月第二个周五晚6.30-7.30在Fendalton图书馆会面。

严歌苓部分小说书目Novels by Contemporary Chinese Author Yan, Geling

Hong Wang
Network Library Assistant

Selina Tusitala Marsh and Tusiata Avia – Fast burning women: WORD Christchurch Festival 2018

Selina Tusitala Marsh is impressive. Tall and exuding warmth with an open, smiley countenance topped by a mass of long dark curls, she enters carrying her tokotoko which is topped with long hair mirroring her own.

Selina Tusitala Marsh. Image supplied.
Selina Tusitala Marsh. Image supplied.

One immediately feels drawn to her and the packed audience settles down to be entertained. Selina is in conversation with her sister poet and friend, Tusiata Avia. They are obviously at ease with each other and enjoy talking together.

Selina is New Zealand’s current Poet Laureate, the fifth woman to hold this position and the first woman of colour. She feels she has an obligation and responsibility to make everyone feel included as well as showcasing her Pasifika heritage.

Her mission is to get the story of the tokotoko out there and she regularly invites people to come along and touch it. It is fitting that she is the 11th Poet Laureate and the tokotoko breaks down into eleven pieces which is necessary for travel.

Paula Green, NZ poet, says “Hone Tuwhare and Sam Hunt are the two poets that are so beloved by our nation. I predict Selina is our third.”

One wonders how she manages to fit everything in in her extremely packed schedule. She has composed and performed for the Queen and welcomed Barack Obama to New Zealand. As well as travelling extensively both here and abroad, she is involved in the Writers in Schools Programme which is booked up for the next two years.

She feels women find it hard to value their self-worth and to ask for help. With the help of her friend Tusiata, she is learning to be more forthright. She equates life to four burners – Family, Health, Work and Friendship. For a long time the friendship burner was missing. She felt guilty about leaning on friends when she had so little time to reciprocate. She is definitely in the fast burning lane.

Tusiata meanwhile is recovering from burnout, suffering ill health from her fast pace of life. Whilst recuperating at home, they spent many hours on the phone talking. Selina was thrilled. She could now talk whilst running around Waiheke Island, where she lives and maintain two burners at once – exercising for health and friendship by being each other’s sounding board. She also advocates movement of mind and body for relaxation. This is achieved by running, yoga, writing and creating. Running is also where she has inspiration for her poetry. She has boundaries surrounding her family time and makes sure she spends weekends with them when she is in New Zealand, hence her 4pm flight back to Auckland following her appearance.

Tusiata Avia. Image supplied.
Tusiata Avia. Image supplied.

We were treated to Selina reading a poem from her latest book Tightrope titled ‘The Working Mother’s Guide to Reading Seventy Books a Year‘.

Where to now? Her latest project is a graphic mini memoir very aptly titled “Mophead to Poet Laureate” which is due out in 2019.

Colette Squire
Papanui Library

Go YA – WORD Christchurch Festival 2018

Go YA brought together three writers for young adults – Juno Dawson, Whiti Hereaka, and Yaba Badoe – to read from their novels.

CoverFirst to read was Juno Dawson whose latest novel Clean is a confronting depiction of heroin addiction and withdrawal as told by a teenage socialite, Lexi Volkov. Paula Morris described Clean as being about “the lure of self-destruction” and the teenage pressure “of being something they’re not”. She compared Lexi’s narrative to that of real-world figures in the media who struggled with addiction such as Peaches Geldof.

Paula Morris had previously warned the audience that there would be some swearing and Juno Dawson jokingly referred to Clean as “degenerate filth” before beginning her reading. Lexi’s choice of language as she lashes out at the world challenged the 12+ rating given to this ‘family’ event. Lexi speaks directly to the reader, sharing her every thought and feeling. As a result, it was a performative reading. Juno Dawson rolled her eyes, pouted, and screeched, as she read from the opening chapter in which Lexi – waking from a night of partying and heroin in a car – realises that her brother is admitting her to a rehabilitation clinic away from the familiar lights of London.

Our second reader was Yaba Badoe whose novel, A Jigsaw of Fire and Stars, was described as an “exploration of our rich inheritance of myth and legend, pain and love”. A Jigsaw of Fire and Stars is a magical realist novel about a young girl, Sante, whose family attempted to migrate from Africa to Europe by sea but were killed when the ship was purposefully sunk. Sante, washed ashore in a chest laden with treasure, is rescued by Mama Rose and becomes part of her travelling circus. She yearns to know more about her family’s story. Yaba Badoe read from a later passage in the book in which Mama Rose begins to tell Sante about her origins. Like Clean, A Jigsaw of Fire and Stars, has serious themes, this time human trafficking and migration. As Sante recalls seeing brown bodies washed up on a beach and herself being thrown aboard as an infant, it’s hard not to recall the images of the body of Alan Kurdi, a young victim of the refugee crisis and human trafficking. Yaba Badoe spoke more on magical realism and migration during ‘Yaba Badoe: Fire, Stars and Witches’.

Cover“History is moulded by the those who tell it” Paula Morris told the audience before Whiti Hereaka took the stage. She read from her newest novel Legacy which is about the experiences of the Māori Contingent during World War One and where their stories sit in that ANZAC narrative that strongly permeates New Zealand culture. The protagonist of Legacy, Riki, is drawn to the idea of enlisting in the army. Each generation of his family has enlisted and his mother shares with him stories of his great-great-grandfather who fought in Egypt in World War One as part of the Māori Contingent. Whiti Hereaka’s reading highlighted the theme of legacy as Riki ruminates on his likeness to this legendary family figure and the repetition of the war through its commemoration. The reading ended with a cliff-hanger as Riki read a text revealing why his girlfriend has been avoiding him and stepped straight into the path of a bus on Lambton Quay.

This drew a big gasp from the audience and started off question time with a request to know if Riki survives. Whiti Hereaka cheekily held the cover up and plugged the UBS stall in the foyer for those who needed to know what happened next.

There wasn’t much time for questions. The first question asked the authors how they created their characters. Juno Dawson remarked that she “sometimes has to spend more time devising the character” but sometimes they come to her fully fledged, like Lexi did. Yaba Badoe similarly remarked about Sante: “Once she came to me, it was really fun writing her. I loved her company.” Whiti Hereaka admitted that she’s a “bit of a creeper” and sits at the back of the bus with her headphones in, but not listening to anything, to eavesdrop on the conversations. It’s great way to capture the voice of young people and pick up new slang. Juno Dawson commented that voice is the most powerful part of a character development and once you have that voice and you can firmly say that your character wouldn’t say or do something, you know you’ve got it. In this way characters are like “imaginary friends” or “voices in your head”, she laughed.

The second question from audience was about writing for adults versus young adults. Yaba Badoe told the audience that her editor defines YA as “12 to 120”, that it’s writing for anyone and everyone. She remarked that YA is a “marketing term” and novels such as Catcher in the Rye and Jane Eyre, generally put in the basic of (adult) ‘classics’, could be considered YA. Sadly, we ran out of time to continue unpacking this question. What is (or isn’t) YA was the subject of a university course I took so I was a little disappointed not to be able to hear more about the authors’ thoughts on it. However, if these selections of readings are anything to go by, YA isn’t afraid to tackle complex topics and is about discovering your voice and place in this often-difficult world. I would highly recommend picking up these authors’ books and giving YA a Go.

Also try:

Find works in our collection by:

Alicia Harbison-Price

Free Radicals: WORD Christchurch Festival 2018

In conjunction with UC Arts, Empress Theatre Collective presents Free Radicals – an evolving song cycle that celebrates the achievements of women in science and technology. This sold out show on Wednesday night was beautifully presented – a one hour long series of various musical compositions featuring female scientists combined by narration. Great care was taken in the creating the setting with tasteful lighting and imagery to welcome you into the small, intimate space. The atmosphere in the full house was expectant.

Erin Harrington entered to a beautifully lit room and began with a moving and succinct original poem. Her narrative thread drew all of the disparate pieces together in a great and flowing way. The show began with Ariana Tikao singing a song called ‘Bind the Black’ featuring taonga pūoro: pūrerehua, kōauau and pūtōrino. It made for a wonderful opening that felt very welcoming and warm. After some narration by Erin, The Swan Sisters’ voices combined beautifullly in their tribute to Maria Sybilla Merian, The Great Outdoors.

They were followed by Sheree Waitoa on vocal and guitar performing her song Connections, a great song that included te reo Māori and English lyrics  and honoured the famous actor and scientist, Hedy Lamarr.

The next work by Glenda Keam was a tribute to the female NASA scientists that were portrayed in the Hollywood movie Hidden Figures. A stark and interesting work featured four solos, and a trio for three vocalists and prepared piano.

Technology was featured in the next piece by Misfit Mod with a flowing and wonderful visual element that help to bind the atmospheric work with the audience.

Beatrice Tinsley, the astronomer who originally studied at Canterbury University, was the subject of the next song by Naomi Ferguson. The electronic soundscape was enhanced by Ferguson’s flowing and powerful melodies.

To end the show the narrator joined with a small choir to sing In Feminea Forma, a piece for voices and electronics by Rosa Elliott. The electronics in this piece and throughout were seamless and added to the well-curated atmosphere.

This show was excellent. I loved every piece, the variety, the atmosphere, and most of all the illuminating subject matter. Hopefully the show will have a life beyond the WORD Christchurch Festival.

This show is also on tonight and there are some tickets still available. Don’t miss out.

Alex Van den Broek
Media Studio Specialist

National Poetry Day – Friday 24 August 2018

Aotearoa has been celebrating National Poetry Day on the last Friday in August for over 20 years now! This year it’s on Friday 24 August, and across the country, you can engage in all kinds of events, workshops and competitions. There’s even people marking the occasion with poetry readings in as far flung places as Edinburgh and Berlin.

Closer to home, Ōtautahi has some really cool events you can check out, whether you’re into attending a writing workshop, seeing poetry performed, or entering a competition. If you’re into the competition side of things, make sure you map out submission dates in your calendar now – there’s lots going on with lots of different due dates, but if you leave it till the week of Poetry Day, you might be too late!

Late in the evening, there’s a fiery and feisty evening of poetry planned at the Space Academy, on St Asaph Street – ‘We Are The Persistence’ features Tusiata Avia, Ray Shipley, Alice Andersen, Rebecca Nash and Isla Martin.

If you’re looking for events that are a little more interactive, you could check out the Great Wall of Poetry – a giant display of a diverse range of local poetry – at University Bookshop, Ilam Campus. You can go along and read the work on the wall, and you can also submit your own poems.

UBS is also hosting a poetry workshop with local legend Kerrin P. Sharpe (whose new book, ‘Louder’, is being released at the end of the month). The hour-long workshop, from 12.30-1.30pm, will be full of writing exercises and feedback, with an opportunity for the work you create to be published in UBS’s inaugural National Poetry Day online collection!

Warm-up and wrap-up events happening before and after National Poetry Day

If you’re school age (year 5 to 13) you might like to check out the Young Writers Poetry Pentathlon on Thursday 23 August – a game show crossed with a writing class! Sounds wild.

And the day after National Poetry Day, the fine folk at Hagley Writers Institute are hosting two Saturday daytime workshops so you can take all the inspiration from the previous day and turn it into a poetic masterpiece.

Christchurch City Libraries are of course getting in on the poetry action with a daytime, all-ages, free event on Saturday 25 August at lovely New Brighton Library from 2pm-3pm, featuring readings from four local poets: Jeni Curtis, Heather McQuillan, David Gregory, and Jeffrey Paparoa Holman.

Explore the full list of events across New Zealand.

COMPETITIONS

Nationally, there are some great and creative poetry competitions to get your teeth sunk into.

My favourite ones include:

National Poetry Day is an opportunity for lovers of poetry to spend the day writing, listening, and getting inspired; but it’s also a day of discovery and new ideas for folks who may have found poetry a bit hard to engage with previously. New Zealand has so many wonderful poets from diverse and wonderful backgrounds, and if you take the time this National Poetry Day to encounter something new, you won’t regret it!

New Zealand poetry at WORD Christchurch Festival 2018

Find works in our collection by these New Zealand poets appearing at the WORD Christchurch Festival from Wednesday 28 August to Sunday 2 September:

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See more poetry events at WORD Christchurch.

Ray
Upper Riccarton

跨文化家庭教育和图书馆的资源 Cross-cultural parenting with library resources

根据大英百科全书Britannica Library Adults, 教育是传递一个社会的价值观和知识以达到个人社会化的过程。尽管每个现代社会都有从幼儿园到大学的正规化教育,通过亲子关系付诸实施的家庭教育在这一社会化过程中起着非常重要的作用。它是最早、最直接、最具影响力的、集养育和教育为一体的过程。它会影响到正规教育的结果。然而,对于我们华人移民来说,家庭教育并不是易事。家长从其移民身份带来的东方式价值观和知识不一定适用于在新西兰成长并接受西方正规教育的孩子。

跨文化的养育和教育的酸甜苦辣在《虎妈的圣歌》“The Battle Hymn of Tiger Mother”演绎得淋漓尽致。人们在笑谈亚洲成绩标准Asian Grading Scale之余也在思考并探讨在这样的跨文化的环境中究竟怎样的教育方式才是合适的。这是一个学习做父母parenting 的过程。为人父母的能力并不是天生的,需要后天的学习和完善。下面三个方面是家长在跨文化的环境中需要学习的。

了解不同的教育理念:

从人类社会初期,教育的目的是在孩子社会化过程中进行文化传承。因此,在进行家庭教育时,生为第一代移民的家长们需要考虑您们和孩子身处的文化、社会环境和与之相关联的教育理念。Britannica Library Adults 中关于教育的科普 知识是一个理想的开端。然后,从Fifty major thinkers on education: From Confucius to DeweyFifty modern thinkers on education: From Piaget to the present中,您会更系统、深入地了解到不同时期和社会文化背景下的教育理念。这有利于您因势利导地选择家庭教育的方式,并与学校的正规教育有机地结合起来。

借鉴教育方法、规范和技巧:

有了对教育理念的理解后,家长们还需学会怎样将这些理念根据情况应用到家庭养育和教育中形成具体方法和技巧。古今中外有很多规则和方法可以借鉴。例如,中国古代清朝启用的《弟子规》秉承了《论语》的传统,列出了为人子弟在家和在外时待人接物以及求学的礼仪和规范,其特别强调以中国传统的“五伦关系”为基础的遵从和孝顺。相反,当前西方广为流传的、在《发现孩子:蒙台梭利儿童教育经典》详细阐述的蒙式教育法则提倡发现并激发孩子的潜能。不管选择了怎样的家庭教育方式或集众家之所长,我们可以考虑汲取象《好妈妈胜过好老师》中的一些具体的、操作性强的建议和方法。身体力行地与孩子相知相处形成适合于自己的家庭教育方法。希望所附的书目能在这方面给您提供一些灵感。

善于使用资源:

选择适合的学习资源也对家庭教育至关重要。基督城图书馆有众多的资源和服务供您选择。家长可带学龄前儿童到图书馆参加讲故事babytimes 和 storytimes 的活动。图书馆的学习中心还有免费和少量收费的假期课外活动。每一个图书馆都有从启蒙程度到适合青少年的书籍,例如 picture book, into reading, younger fiction, older fiction, children’s nonfiction, young adult fiction, young adult nonfiction等。部分图书馆(Central Library Peterborough, Fendalton, Halswell, Hornby, Linwood, Upper Riccarton) 还有中文儿童读物。

图书馆的电子资源也丰富多彩。从三岁儿童就可使用的、寓教于乐的 Busythings 到中小学生都能用的Literacy PlanetSmartMath Practice等家庭作业资源。从Year 5 开始,孩子会在学校遇到一些研究性的问题和项目。教会他们使用大英百科全书Britannica Library Kids和世界图书 World Book Kids等参考书会极大地扩展他们的知识面和自学能力。鼓励孩子使用AnyQuestions在线帮助新西兰学生家庭作业的服务。这一服务是教育部和国家图书馆联合筹办的、由来自新西兰各图书馆的图书管理员提供的在线服务项目。该项目能帮助学生们学会查询、评估和使用作业相关的信息。除此之外,Mango LanguageDragonSource 对学习中文的孩子们必不可少。

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尽管跨文化的家庭教育不是一件容易的事,但如果家长们能从理论到方法和资源上先武装自己,学会怎样做父母,将这些资源通过适合的方法和技巧有机地结合到日常计划中,跨文化的家庭教育定会硕果累累。

Hong Wang, Network Library Assistant

Christchurch kids! Give Tūranga’s Bookbots Earth names & win prizes! (2 to 31 July)

Kids can win awesome prizes by filling out this special online survey. All you have to do is help name Tūranga’s intergalactic heroes, the Bookbots.

During the month of July, local primary and intermediate students can vote on their favourite names for the digital characters and go in the draw to win prizes, including a real-life interactive robot for their school, with training provided by PBTech, and a class workshop with Imagination Station. Bluetooth speakers from Spark and giant Bookbot wall decals are also up for grabs.

Voting is open to local primary and intermediate students until 31 July 2018 (limited to one entry per student).