Ready for the big guns? Time for eResources Discovery Search

Young-lady-sitting-on-the-floor-using-her-laptop-233x300When you have come to your senses and cast aside Wikipedia and Google in the quest for serious research solutions – then the library has what you require. The best research tool to start with is eResources Discovery Search or eDS for short. No matter how tight the deadline is this online treasure is available 24/7.

What makes it so great? Well it provides you with access to most of our eResource collection, articles, eBooks, journals, and photographs, through a single simultaneous search at a single access point. So with one search in one place you can search across huge swathes of information just like Google – but all of the information you find is authoritative and referenced without funny yet distracting cat videos.

For example what if you had to research Donald Trump? Put that name in eDS and these miraculous things happen …

eDS

Research starters – at the top of your search results there will be a “research starter” on Trump. There are starters for most topics which is useful if you want a starting point or a brief background.

To the left – tools to refine results to the most relevant. These include:

  • Publication date – maybe you only want articles from the last six months?
  • Source types – do you need a video, journal article or book on Trump?
  • Subject – are you interested in his talk shows or his political campaign?
  • Content providers – maybe you want a biography from Gale Biography in Context?

To the right – you get images, videos and newswires you can use or access the library catalogue. If you get stuck there is also Live Online to get you back on track.

Basically eDS is all you need in your answer arsenal and can be used anytime of the day but is most effective when you are really stressed and have a deadline looming. All you need to use this solution to all your research requirements is your library card number and password/PIN. Bookmark it now.

Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori – Māori Language Week 2016

The dates for Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori (Māori Language Week) this year are 4 – 11 Hōngongoi (4-11 July) and this year the theme is –

Te reo tautoko – behind you all the way

The phrase “Ākina te reo – using the Māori to show support” is also being used as part of the campaign which includes celebrity ambassadors like Canterbury’s own Andrew Mehrtens making more of an effort to improve their te reo skills.

Te Reo Māori i Te Whare pukapuka – Māori Language at The Library

Cover of Kanohi: My faceChristchurch City Libraries – Ngā Kete Wānanga o Ōtautahi will be celebrating Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori with special bilingual storytimes throughout the week. See our events calendar for one near you.

The Wā Kōrero (Storytime) session at New Brighton will have a special guest performer in Kitty Brown, co-author of a series of te reo Māori board books for children.

We’re also hosting a special event on The History of Te Reo Māori in Children’s Publishing on Thursday, 7 July at Fendalton Library.

But there’s no need to attend a special event to add te reo Māori to your library experience -why not simply try out the reo Māori option on our self checkout machines?

Te Reo Māori self checkout
Te Reo Māori self checkout, Flickr File Reference: 2014-07-10-IMG_0669

Read our Te Kupu o Te Wiki (Word of the week) blog posts.

Or learn a new kupu (word) by reading our bilingual library signs or even just learn to say the Māori name of your local library.

Ngā Rauemi Te Reo Māori – Māori Language Resources

Whaowhia te kete mātauranga – Fill the basket of knowledge

There are many, many resources available for anyone wanting to improve their te reo Māori knowledge. Here are some suggestions for filling your basket.

Hākinakina – Sports

Ākina te reo - support the language

Ngā Rauemi mō Ngā Tamariki – Children’s Resources

Download one of our colouring in pages [39KB PNG, 354KB PDF]

Matariki

Cover of Ko wai tōku ingoa?Search our catalogue

We’ve also made lists of modern classic picture books in Te Reo Māori and Māori stories for older children.

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Māmā (Mum)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

Māmā
Mum

Ki a Māmā, me te aroha nui, nā Emākoau.
To Mum, with love, from Emākoau.

Whāngahia te Reo

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Oma (run)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

oma
run

E oma, e te tau!
Run, my darling!

Whāngahia te Reo

Science Snippets – Illuminating

Each week during term time (except the first and last week) the team from Science Alive bring their Science Snippets sessions into our libraries. Excellent Science Alive educators lead children through interactive activities to stimulate their interest in science, and there is something to take home every week!

There is a different theme for each session and this coming week from Monday 20 June it’s Illuminating. This week’s theme ties into the Lyttelton Harbour Festival of Lights which runs from 18-27 June. Check out our page about the Lyttelton Harbour Festival of Lights. 

You are sure to learn all about light and do some fun experiments with light.

Cover of Glaring light and other eye-burning raysHere are some great nonfiction books that we have in the library if you want to learn more about light:

Cover of The game of lightHere are some stories about light and darkness to read too:

We also have some fantastic eResources with heaps of information about light. Check these out:

  • Britannica Library Kids – a search for ‘light’ gives you information about light, with different levels of information for different ages.
  • Logo for National Geographic kidsNational Geographic Kids – a search for ‘light’ gives you some great information from the National Geographic Kids magazine as well as access to several eBooks about light.
  • World Book Kids – a search for ‘light’ gives you some basic information about light, along with some suggestions for other topics you might like to look at for more information.

For more information about Science Alive’s Science Snippets check out Science Alive on our website.

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Noho (sit)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

noho
sit

Kia tika te noho, e te tau.
Sit properly, my darling.

Whāngahia te Reo

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Pānui (read)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

pānui
read

He pai ki a koe te pānui pukapuka?
Do you like to read books?

Whāngahia te Reo

Memory bags arrive at South Library

Memory bags can be beneficial for people with dementia. The memory bags contain a selection of objects chosen to help stimulate the senses and promote reminiscing and discussion.

Memory bag number 4: Kitchen
The kitchen memory bag

The bags can be issued on a library card for four weeks. Our new memory bags have four themes:

They are located alongside the Large print collection at South Library.

Kim
Acting Team Leader Outreach and Learning

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Pukapuka (book)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

pukapuka
book

Whakahokia ngā pukapuka.
What would you like for lunch, my darling?

Whāngahia te Reo

Science Snippets – Matariki

Each week during term time (except the first and last week) the team from Science Alive bring their Science Snippets sessions into our libraries. Excellent Science Alive educators lead children through interactive activities to stimulate their interest in science, and there is something to take home every week! There is a different theme for each session and this coming week from Monday 30 May it’s Matariki.

You are sure to learn all about Matariki and the stars. We have a great page for kids about Matariki. Learn all about Matariki and traditions, what happens at Matariki and find some cool colouring pages.

Here are some great nonfiction books that we have in the library if you want to learn more about Matariki and the stars:

Here are some stories about Matariki and stars to read too:

We also have some fantastic eResources with heaps of information about stars.  Check these out:

  • Britannica Library Kids– a search for ‘stars’ gives you information about stars, with different levels of information for different ages.
  • World Book Kids – a search for ‘stars’ gives you some basic information about stars, along with some suggestions for other topics you might like to look at for more information.
  • National Geographic Kids – a search for ‘stars’ gives you some great information from the National Geographic Kids magazine as well as access to several eBooks about stars and the solar system.

More information about Science Alive’s Science Snippets.