Cosplay and Comics at Papanui Library

Love reading and drawing your own comics? Do you want help with your drawing, assistance with your technique and tips on comics, publishing etc and a free comic? All of this for no charge? Right then get yourself signed up for our free comic drawing workshop at Papanui Library with Spencer Hall, artist/cartoonist. The workshop is for ages 12-18, registered attendees only and a limit of 30. We won’t let you go hungry either, there will be pizzas from Hell.

comic book day posterThere was a waiting list of disappointed young cartoonists last year so don’t delay, break out the light sabers, shake out those capes, slap on the face paint and come dressed as your favourite comic book/Manga character and be in for a prize.

International Free Comic Book Day is on Saturday 7 May this year but our event, which will include free comics courtesy of Comics Compulsion, will be on Saturday 21 May.

The selection of free comics this year ranges from Dark Horse to Archie to Strawberry Shortcake to Titan’s Assassins Creed to Love and Rockets. Something for all tastes.

To see what you might be missing check out last year’s pictures.

Meanwhile back at the library our comic book collection grows apace. We have comic books about Men who dress as Bats, Women as Cats, Green Men, muscly men, and animals that talk, Bart Simpson and Adventures, Mysteries, Funnies, Scareys, the lot. I was delighted to see Scrooge McDuck, nephew Donald and the Beagle Boys make a comeback in hard cover. Made me quite nostalgic for my young reading self.

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Tina (lunch)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

tina
lunch

He aha hei tina māu, e te tau?
What would you like for lunch, my darling?

Whāngahia te Reo

The BBC Video Collection warms our dark nights

BBC cover-tempWhen I lived in the UK as long as there was not a Tube delay due to “man under train”, bomb threats, mechanical failure or leaves on the tracks I would normally watch the BBC news. I would just get in the door in time for the familiar Beep, Beep, Beep which always comes just before the start of the news. I loved the BBC news as it was my time to collapse after work and the presenters would soothe me with their proper pronunciation, quality news reporting and interesting television. To me the BBC has succeeded in its royal charter where it must – “inform, educate and entertain”.

There can be no denying that as well as news the BBC has produced some amazing television over the years and we are now in a position to gather together some of its most viewed documentaries in one place with the BBC Video Collection.  So far I have set up a personal account so I can create a playlist which includes Sister Wendy’s Grand Tour and Terry Jones’ Barbarians. This quick list I made will guarantee that as the evenings get darker and colder I will not be reduced to watching dating or cooking shows on our own TV networks. If history is not your thing, do not despair as there are titles on engineering, music, health, business and science and a multitude of other interests. All you need to do is search, watch and relax. If Christchurch traffic tests your nerve endings much like the Tube did mine then you too can escape into the world of the BBC.

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Makawe (hair)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

makawe
hair

Ka heru i ō makawe, e te tau.
Brush your hair, my darling.

Whāngahia te Reo

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Kura (school)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

kura
school

Kei te haere koe ki te kura āpōpō.
You’re going to school tomorrow

Whāngahia te Reo

Things to do in the school holidays – April 2016

School holidays start on Monday 18 April – or after school on Friday 15 April. Our libraries and learning centres will be busy with animal-themed programmes and activities as well as origami, scavenger hunts, and games.

School holiday programmes

Here’s some picks – some require booking, so check them out and book in:

At libraries and learning centres

  • Toy animal sleepover – leave a toy at the library, then pick it up in the morning. There will be pics taken on the shenanigans it gets up to … (free)
  • Minecraft game zone (aimed at 8 to 12 year olds) 3D gaming experience that involves creating your virtual world and interacting with others ($7 per kid)
  • BeeBots (for 4 to 7 year olds) Kids can explore a story with a BeeBot and learn basic robotic skills. ($7 per kid)

Schoolhols

In Christchurch

  • Make Where the wild things are masks and Pet Monsters at the Christchurch Art Gallery. ($8 per child)
  • The movie is going to be played in the auditorium on Wednesday 27 April at 7pm. (gold coin entry)
  • If – like us – you are bit obsessed with that sugary delight of Pip & Pop at the Christchurch Art Gallery, Sweet Dreams (are made of these) is for you. Your kids will help create a colourful mosaic using stickers created by Tanya Schultz, the artist who made it. This event is on 10, 17 April, 8 May, and 5 June. (free, but book in)
The newest new world by Pip & Pop
The newest new world by Pip & Pop. Flickr 2015-12-20-IMG_1690
  • If it’s a nice autumn day, explore the Kids Discovery Trail at the Christchurch Botanic Gardens. (free)
  • Cultural Constellations by Science Alive! is a neat experience for the whole family. You sit in the StarDome and feel like you are exploring space. ($5 per person; $20 for families of 4 or more)
  • Go for a swim at one of our local pools. (see prices)
  • Visit Christchurch’s superpopular Margaret Mahy Playground, or one of the other many cool parks. Playgrounds are listed in Find:Chch. (free)
Margaret Mahy Playground
Margaret Mahy Playground. Flickr 2015-12-23-IMG_1728

Moata’s post has great suggestions on reading and stuff to help make travelling with kids more fun and less stress. And of course your local library has plenty of CDs, DVDs, eBooks, eAudiobooks, books, mags, and stuff for kids.

We’d love to hear your ideas of things to do in the school holidays too.

World Autism Awareness Day

The 2nd of April was World Autism Awareness Day. Just search Twitter, Google, Facebook, or Instagram for #lightitupblue or #LIUB and you will find pictures of buildings, monuments, and the Wonders of the World all lit up blue for autism awareness. The Sydney Opera House, the Pyramids of Giza, Christ the Redeemer, and the Niagara Falls all lit up blue.

This day came to my attention about three and a half years ago. At the age of three, our son Wiremu was flagged at preschool for having very little verbal communication, and limited social interaction with other children. As our firstborn, we had dreams of raising a trilingual super-child (Samoan, Māori and English) and we assumed that because Wiremu was learning three languages, he didn’t speak as quickly. We also thought that Wiremu didn’t go out of his way to interact with other children because there simply weren’t that many children around. He loved the many adults in his life and was very close with his grandparents, aunties, uncles and cousins.

Wiremu

When the Ministry of Education and all their specialists became involved at the beginning of what was to be more than a year long series of diagnoses, we really believed that they would find that there was nothing really different about our son. The truth is, autism is estimated to affect up to 40,000 individuals and their families just within New Zealand. It has a higher prevalence than Down’s Syndrome and cerebral palsy. Chances are, you know someone that is autistic or has a family member that is on the autistic spectrum.

Being the good librarian that I am, as soon as it became clear that Autism Spectrum disorder was a likely diagnosis for Wiremu, I went straight to the library catalogue and searched for resources on autism. My readings informed me that ASD is a complex developmental disorder involving delays in problems with social interaction, language, and a range of emotional, cognitive, motor and sensory abilities. Since then I have easily read, watched, and at least reserved (took one look and instantly returned) most things autism related within Christchurch City Libraries. At one stage, there was almost a whole shelf of books on autism in the relatively small community library that I was working in.

Autism

There was also lots of very informative websites like Autism NZ, and Facebook groups for parents with autistic children that were awesome e-support networks, online forums, and videos. I think as a parent or carer of a child with autism, it is firstly important to get your head around what autism is. I read book after book about these families of autists, but I found it so hard to fit what I was seeing at home into this stereotypical definition of autism. Wiremu is so loving, he is a wonderful judge of character, his smile lights up a room, and his giggles are infectious. He adores swimming, sausages, Michael Jackson, rainbows, his little brother Che and Mickey Mouse. He doesn’t know many personal boundaries, so if he likes you he will sit on your lap and give you a full kiss on the mouth.

Once you realise that autism presents itself so differently in every individual, and that there is no cure for autism it makes things easier. With the support of loving family, friends, a team of awesome specialists and some amazing teachers and teacher aides – and some good quality information – all things are possible. Wiremu is currently attending school, and is fully integrated into a Year 2 mainstream class with the help of his teacher and wonderful teacher aides. Just last month, he started writing letters without prompting and matching the letters of his name. As a family, Wiremu has taught us to slow our fast-paced lifestyle, to appreciate and celebrate the tiny but monumental achievements we make together everyday.

I have made up a reading list of some helpful autism resources for parents and families. Don’t be afraid to seek help, there are some wonderful people out there that are always willing to do what they can. And don’t always take no for an answer. #LIGHTITUPBLUE

Autism resources

150冊の日本の電子書籍がOverdriveに加わりました

こんにちわ!

Christchurch City Libraries は、この度150冊の日本の電子書籍を購入しました。

Japanese on OverDrive

新しく加わったタイトルには、今まで図書館では置いてなかった日本の近現代文学を中心に、料理本、Dr. Prakash Dheeriya のFinance for Kidsシリーズなどが含まれています。

また、日本語が母国語ではない子供向けの日本語の教材も加わりました(もしお知り合いのお子さんで日本語を学びたい方がいましたら是非教えてあげてください)。これらは今までの図書館の本のコレクションにはなかったものですので、皆さんが活用してくれると大変嬉しく思います!

Overdriveで日本語の本をお探しの場合は、advanced searchからLanguageをJapaneseに選択してください。iPadやタブレットコンピューターなどをお持ちの方は、専用のOverdrive Appをインストールすればこれらの電子書籍を直接ダウンロードできます。電子書籍リーダーの場合は、パソコンにダウンロードしてそこから専用端末にデータを移すことができます(詳しくはこちら)。また、Overdriveを使うにはパスワードが必要です。

Overdriveへのアクセス、電子書籍のダウンロード、図書館のメンバーシップの更新、パスワードの設定など、問題がございましたら何でもお手伝いさせていただきます。直接最寄の図書館へお越しいただくか、電話でお問い合わせください。

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Aroha (love)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

aroha
love

Ka nui taku aroha mōu, e te tau!
I love you very much, darling!

Whāngahia te Reo

Christmas traditions and amigurumi

9781452103600OK, so as I write this I’m munching away on Easter chocolate, and Christmas is so last year already, but I’ve been wanting to tell you about one of my family’s Christmas traditions. Every year, I make each of the kids a handmade gift. I didn’t even know that they’d noticed, or cared particularly until two Christmases ago when I said to Miss Missy that I didn’t think I’d be able to make her anything because I was running out of time.

But Mum, you ALWAYS make me something for Christmas! It just wouldn’t be right if you didn’t!

Wow, OK kid! I just couldn’t say no after that, could I? So at the last minute (and I mean seriously – I was stitching at like 5 minutes to midnight Christmas Eve) I whipped up a patchwork and applique cushion for her bed.

This Christmas (or is that last Christmas already now?) my problem wasn’t time, it was coming up with what to make. Miss Missy is a newly minted teenager – the smocked dresses, applique T-shirts, or cutesy hair accessories of years past just weren’t going to cut it. What to make was on the back of my mind for months, when I found the perfect thing: a crocheted amigurumi unicorn.

Now I had a new problem: I don’t crochet.

I don’t mean that I CAN’T crochet. I can; I learnt how years ago when I was in school (Steiner education, you know). I just never got good at it. My first attempt was supposed to be a hat for myself. But I gave up in disgust when the other kids in my class were wearing their beanies already, and all I had was a misshapen things that looked like a floppy sunhat – not for my head though, all it would fit was my Sindy doll (if you don’t remember Sindy, she’s about Barbie’s size!). It suited Sindy but I wouldn’t call the hat a success!

d2364bbd-d097-4ee7-80c4-9e70d8bce6f7A few years – and many successful non-crochet craft projects later – I tried again. This time, I decided to make some snowflake Christmas tree decorations.  They looked so pretty in the pattern book I thought it was worth giving crochet another try. Well. I stuck at it, and made three snowflakes for myself, as well as a few for friends. But sticking with it didn’t make it any easier. I was constantly making mistakes and having to undo everything. I had to concentrate so darn hard I couldn’t enjoy it.

No. I decided I liked crochet about as much as going to the dentist.

9781784940645But, for Miss Missy, I put all that aside, and set to with her gift. Turns out, I still don’t like to crochet, but I really do like amigurumi! They are so cute, it makes the frustration worth it! In fact, I decided to make another amigurumi as a gift for a friend. And when I saw a copy of  Boho Crochet I decided that the Christmas tree really could use some more crochet decorations too. Maybe crochet isn’t quite as bad as the dentist…(though I don’t love it enough to crochet myself a trophy head for the living room wall).

After beating crochet into submission, I’ve felt drawn to books on crafts I’ve never tried. I’m sure I’m not the only one out there who’s keen to learn new crafts, so I’ve put together a list of some craft and hobby books that struck my fancy. Some I’m an old hand at, some I’ve never tried, but all gorgeous!

Related Resources