Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Tangi (cry)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kiwaha (idiom)

Ki hori
Step aside

Kupu (word)

tangi
cry

Kaua e tangi, e te tau.
Don’t cry, my darling

Whāngahia te Reo

 

3D printing parts – Hover board lifts off

Science_Project_2up_Web

Luka is a Year 7 student from Cobham Intermediate. Luka has entered his home built “Hover board” which utilises Maglev (Magnetic Levitation) technology into a school science fair. He was encountering some issues with one of the housings holding the magnets. He 3D modelled himself a new design using Google SketchUp and contacted us to see if we could 3D print the parts for him.

We jumped at the chance to help. Luka’s project is amazing; we are glad that we are able to assist as this is why we embraced 3D printing in the first place. It allows our customers access to technology that they may not normally be able to utilise.

At this stage there is not a specific system or pricing structure in place for customer 3D printing, but with enquiries ramping up, we will be working on it. Watch this space.

If you want to see something really inspiring, here is a clip of Luka’s hover board in action:

Danny McNeil
South Learning Centre

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Au (to be sound)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kiwaha (idiom)

Ehara i te tī
You only live once

Kupu (word)

au
sound (of sleep)

I au tō moe, e te tau?
Did you have a good sleep, my darling?

Whāngahia te Reo

 

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Oho (awake)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kiwaha (idiom)

Wēkeneru
Holy moly

Kupu (word)

oho
awake

Kua oho mai koe.
You’re awake.

Whāngahia te Reo

 

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Ātaahua (beautiful)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Whakataukī

Ki te kahore he whakakitenga ka ngaro te iwi.
Without foresight or vision the people will be lost.

Said by Kingi Tawhiao Potatau te Wherowhero, to show the urgency of unification and strong Māori leadership.

Kīwaha (idiom)

Wehi nā
Oh my goodness

Kupu (word)

ātaahua
beautiful

Tō ātaahua hoki! 
You’re so beautiful!

Whāngahia te Reo

 

Cook Islands Language Week 2015

Hibiscus flowerCook Islands Language Week – Te ‘Epetoma o Te Reo Kūki ‘Āirani celebrates the languages spoken by the people of the Cook Islands; Cook Islands Māori, the Western Polynesian language Pukapuka, and the distinctive mixture of Cook Islands Māori and English spoken by the people of Palmerston Island.

In 2015 Cook Islands Language week will take place from 3 – 9 August. The theme for Cook Islands Language week this year is –

To tatou reo tupuna e korona ia no to tatou matakeinanga

Our language is a crowning glory of our community

2015 is also the Cook Islands’ 50th year anniversary of self-governance in free association with New Zealand.

Celebrate at Christchurch City Libraries

Cook Islands Māori Storytimes at Aranui Library

In conjunction with the Ministry of Pacific Island Affairs, Aranui Library will be hosting a community event in the form of a Cook Islands Māori Language themed storytime on Thursday 6 August, 11am-11.30am.

Our Resources

Check out our Cook Islands Language Week page for sound files of basic Cook Islands Māori greetings and words.

Cover of Cook Islands Māori alphabet bookSearch our catalogue for Cook Islands Language resources –

Te Reo Māori, ake, ake, ake

As Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori draws to a close we can all stop using our newly learned kupu and vastly improved pronunciation until next year, right?

KAO. (That’s a big NO, just in case you were wondering)

You can use te reo Māori and embrace the arts and culture of indigenous New Zealanders any time. And in Christchurch we’ve got some great opportunities coming up to do just that so let’s keep the poro rolling with –

Te Kupu o Te Wiki

Every Monday on this blog there’ll be a kupu hou (new word) to add to your vocabulary, complete with a link where you can listen online so no worries about not getting your pronunciation tino tika.

E Hoa

Māori art vector prints by Dallas Matoe and Lino cuts by George Aranui, until 15 August at Linwood Community Arts Centre/Eastside Gallery.

New Zealand International Film Festival logoEver the land

NZIFF documentary about the planning and building of New Zealand’s first “living building”, Te Wharehou o Tūhoe. This is no Grand Designs, it’s much more than that. Session on 15 & 16 August.

Ngā Whanaunga Māori Pasifika Shorts 2015

This year’s expression of ‘Ngā Whanaunga’ – which means relatedness and connectedness between peoples – is realised with films from Aotearoa, Hawaii, Samoa and Tuvalu. Session on 19 & 23 August.

The Price of Peace

Investigative journalist Kim Webby’s documentary about Tūhoe activist Tame Iti and the Urewera Four. A portrait of a man and his “rightly embittered philosophy”. Session on 10 & 11 August.

Belief: The Possession of Janet Moses

Documentary about the tragic death of Janet Moses in 2007 as the result of a mākutu lifting by her family. Session on 17 & 18 August.

Modern Māori Quartet

These guys are the business. Don’t believe me? Check out their te reo version of Lorde’s Royals and then tell me one of their shows wouldn’t be a great night out.

Tickets for their 10 & 11 September gigs are selling fast so kia tere!

Christchurch Arts Festival logoNgā Tai o Kurawaka: He Kura e Huna Ana

He Kure e Huna Ana is a Pounamu creation story of Poutini and Waitaki but one which develops with the help of the audience. At the Court Theatre 8-10 September.

Rama Tuna

Priscilla Cowie (Ngai Tahu, Ngati Kahu, Nga Puhi, Ngati Pakeha) presents a new sculptural installation honouring the tuna or long finned eel. View it between 28 August and 13 September at The Arts Centre Market Square.

Whaikōrero – Te Wiki o te Reo Māori – Rāhoroi

Whaikōrero – is an art form.
Kōrero Māori – is possible for all of us.

Te Aka defines whaikōrero as: Formal eloquent language using imagery, metaphor, whakataukī, pepeha, kupu whakaari, relevant whakapapa and references to tribal history is admired. Kōrero (as a verb) is defined as: to tell, say, speak, read, talk, address.

Cover for Manu rere i te rangi Cover for The Awakening Cover for Whaikōrero - the world of Māori Oratory

Ngā Kete Wānanga o Ōtautahi is the kaitiaki of our permanent Nga Pounamu Māori collection. Within these collections, taonga abound. Not only are some available in beautifully presented pukapuka but also through our Wheelers eBook platform. One available in both print and eBook format is Whaikorero: The World of Maori Oratory by Poia Rewi:

Winner of the 2011 NZSA E.H. McCormick Best First Book Award for Non-Fiction, New Zealand Post Book Awards.
The judges felt that Rewi’s book ‘managed the difficult feat of being both a valuable record and manual of Māori oratory for practitioners, and an accessible overview for anyone interested in this ubiquitous cultural practice.’

Whilst the ability to be an outstanding orator (in any language) is beyond many of us, to use Te Reo Māori everyday certainly is not.

On line Te Reo Māori ExhibitionWe can start by knowing and using Ngā Ingoa Māori – the names of places right here in Ōtautahi me Waitaha.

We can also explore the range of pukapuka me moheni published in te Reo Māori available at your local library.

I am a strong advocate of the use of children’s Te Reo Māori books to help my confidence with Kōrero Māori – the pictures often help with the kupu I do not know, ngā rerenga can be short and simple and often there is an English publication for when I get really stuck.

Kia whakatipua te kaipanui – growing readers

Try reading one with your tamariki, rangatahi or mokopuna – ka pai akoronga mo tātou.

Cover for Whakaeke i nga ngaru - Gavin BishopTry Short stories for teens and adults – ‘You only Live once”.
We have graphic novels and  purākau me pakiwaitara in te Reo Maori.

For those of you who like to browse a magazine or periodical, Mana and Te Karaka (online) contain plenty of te teo Māori and some very cool reading to immerse yourself in too.

Karawhiua! Give it a go. Kōreroreo mai

Whakataukī – Te Wiki o te Reo Māori – Rāmere

Tēnā koutou katoa
Ka nui te mihi ki a koutou
Nō reira, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa

Ko te reo te taikura ō te whakaaro marama
Language is the key to understanding

He pai ake te iti i te kore
A little is better than none

Whakataukī are a wonderful way of expressing yourself, sharing thoughts, feelings, perceptions and ideas. We are all familiar with a range of proverbs that we may use without even thinking about their origins. Whakataukī are similar – a quick and effective way to rely a message and use te reo Māori.

Cover for The Raupō book of Māori Proverbs Cover of People of the Land Cover of The Reed book Cover of Nga Pepeha

In the spirit of this year’s kaupapa, here is one for your whānau:

Ka nui taku aroha ki a koe
My love for you knows no bounds

Whakataukī are used everywhere in te Ao Māori and one way of regularly using te Reo Māori is to have a few up your sleeve for frequent use.

Find whakataukī in our collection.

Do you have a whakataukī that you use regularly?

Kōrerorero mai, karawhiua!

Learning te reo Māori – Te Wiki o te Reo Māori – Rāpare

Karawhiua! Kōrero Māori.

Ngā Kete Wānanga o Ōtautahi has a range of te reo Māori resources to help you with your te reo Māori learning.
Cover from Rhyme & Reo  Cover for Launch yourself into Te Reo Māori Cover of He Whakarārama

Whether you are a visual learner or love to write, write and write some more or even if your best learning is done by listening, there is he pukapuka for you to enjoy and discover.

If you like to stay connected then our Te Ao Māori page on our website will keep you engaged for a very very long time. Take a moment (you may need several) to immerse yourself with our online resource Te Whata Raki – learn about Te Ao Māori in a graphically beautiful and bilingual space. New content has just been added as well.

Snapshot from web page of Te Whata Raki

Mā te kimi ka kite, mā te kite ka mōhio, mā te mōhio ka mārama!
Seek and discover, discover and know, know and become enlightened!

Have you a favourite learning tool for Te Reo Māori?

Kōreroreo mai.