Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Māmā (Mum)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

Māmā
Mum

Ki a Māmā, me te aroha nui, nā Emākoau.
To Mum, with love, from Emākoau.

Whāngahia te Reo

Science Snippets – Breathe Easy

Each week during term time (except the first and last week) the team from Science Alive bring their Science Snippets sessions into our libraries. Excellent Science Alive educators lead children through interactive activities to stimulate their interest in science, and there is something to take home every week!

There is a different theme for each session and this coming week from Monday 27 June it’s Breathe Easy. 

You are sure to learn all about breathing, your lungs and asthma.

Here are some great nonfiction books that we have in the library if you want to learn more about breathing:

I couldn’t find any stories about breathing and asthma in our catalogue.  There is this Into Reading book for beginner readers about a boy with asthma:

We also have some fantastic eResources with heaps of information about light. Check these out:

  • Britannica Library Kids – a search for ‘breathing,’ ‘lungs’ and ‘asthma’ gives you information about the respiratory system and asthma, with different levels of information for different ages.
  • World Book Kids – a search for ‘breathing,’ ‘lungs’ and ‘asthma’ gives you information about the respiratory system and asthma, along with some suggestions for other topics you might like to look at for more information.

For more information about Science Alive’s Science Snippets check out Science Alive on our website.

Guilt and parenting: can you have one without the other?

Childcare and childbirth have long been topics that create debate. Any parent can relate to making a decision that others might not agree with, whether it is vaccination, natural childbirth, intervention and pain relief – or breast vs bottle.  Do you leave your child to cry or have them in your bed? The list is endless.

CoverGuilt always seems to go hand in hand with raising children and in a new book Push Back : Guilt in the age of natural parenting the author Amy Tuteur has taken the natural parenting “industry” as she calls it and shakes it to bits. She argues that most of the movements devoted to natural birth or attachment parenting were created and promulgated by elderly white men and that they put forward a pro-women agenda but are in fact quite the opposite – relegating women to the role of primary caregiver where they are required to perform round the clock childcare with little options for work or free time outside of the home. Tuteur wants to “release women from the guilt trap created by the natural parenting industry “.

9781451618006If you want to balance this against the opposite view then have a look at Beyond the sling : a real-life guide to raising confident, loving children the attachment parenting way by Mayim Bialik.

As with most things there is probably a middle ground, but judging by the huge and varying amount parenting titles published each year this is an area where the debate on right and wrong will never diminish.

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Oma (run)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

oma
run

E oma, e te tau!
Run, my darling!

Whāngahia te Reo

Science Snippets – Illuminating

Each week during term time (except the first and last week) the team from Science Alive bring their Science Snippets sessions into our libraries. Excellent Science Alive educators lead children through interactive activities to stimulate their interest in science, and there is something to take home every week!

There is a different theme for each session and this coming week from Monday 20 June it’s Illuminating. This week’s theme ties into the Lyttelton Harbour Festival of Lights which runs from 18-27 June. Check out our page about the Lyttelton Harbour Festival of Lights. 

You are sure to learn all about light and do some fun experiments with light.

Cover of Glaring light and other eye-burning raysHere are some great nonfiction books that we have in the library if you want to learn more about light:

Cover of The game of lightHere are some stories about light and darkness to read too:

We also have some fantastic eResources with heaps of information about light. Check these out:

  • Britannica Library Kids – a search for ‘light’ gives you information about light, with different levels of information for different ages.
  • Logo for National Geographic kidsNational Geographic Kids – a search for ‘light’ gives you some great information from the National Geographic Kids magazine as well as access to several eBooks about light.
  • World Book Kids – a search for ‘light’ gives you some basic information about light, along with some suggestions for other topics you might like to look at for more information.

For more information about Science Alive’s Science Snippets check out Science Alive on our website.

Introducing Toitoi – your chance to get published

We have just subscribed to a fantastic magazine that is for Kiwi kids and by Kiwi kids. Toitoi is a journal for young writers and artists that gives Kiwi kids the chance to submit their own writing and pieces of art to be included in the journal.  There are 100 pages of original stories, poetry and artwork in every issue.  Check out these examples from Issue 3 this year:

Issue 3 Spread1
Issue 3, Toitoi, spread 1. (Image supplied)
Issue 3 Spread2
Issue 3, Toitoi, spread 2. (Image supplied)
Issue 3 Spread3
Issue 3, Toitoi, spread 3. (Image supplied)

It looks really fantastic and who wouldn’t want to see their story, poem or artwork published in a magazine! You can brag to all your friends and your family will be super proud of you. It’s a quarterly journal so that means that there four chances throughout the year for you to submit your writing and art and see it published in the magazine.

Grab a copy of Toitoi from the library now and check out some of the amazing stories, poems and artworks that kids from all over the country have submitted.

Anyone aged 5-13 years can submit a piece to Toitoi. To submit a piece all you have to do is go to the Toitoi website, click on ‘Submit’ at the top of the page and email your submission to the editors. The next deadline is 8 July so you’ve still got a few weeks to get your submission in. What are you waiting for?

Cool stuff from the selectors: Children’s books

5 new children’s books in Braille by Dorling Kindersley

The DK Braille series is fully endorsed by the Royal National Institute of Blind People (UK). Designed especially for visually-impaired children and their parents, these tactile reference books are a wonderful way for curious readers to learn and discover.

9781465436115Our Children’s selector was very excited to see these titles as there has been very little published by mainstream publishers in the past for sight-impaired children and these are by far, in typical DK fashion, superior than other titles she has seen.

A variety of techniques, other than braille are used to make the reading experience come alive to the sight impaired reader. Titles include:

See our list of children’s books in Braille.

9780385373258Beatrix Potter & the unfortunate tale of a borrowed guinea pig Deborah Hopkinson

A delightful and quirky account of the animals in the Young Beatrix Potter’s household, in particular an unexpected mishap to Miss Nina Paget’s Guniea Pig while in Beatrix’s charge. Beautifully illustrated by Charlotte Voake.

Under Earth, under water  Alexsandra Mizielińska

There is lots to explore and discover with this book. One sitting was not enough … Check out its website to learn more about this fascinating book. 

Lyttelton Harbour Festival of Lights 2016

The Lyttelton Harbour Festival of Lights is an annual event of lights, music and fun celebrating the Lyttelton community, Matariki, the Māori New Year and the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year.

The Festival runs over nine days from 18 to 27 June, and this year incorporates the Alliance Française Christchurch Musical Festival on opening night. The programme features a street party (the dress up theme is ‘Futuristic’), a masquerade ball, music, waiata, food and wine, live poetry performances, storytelling, and, of course, fireworks.

Festival of Lights

Highlights of the 2016 programme of events [2319 KB PDF] include:

Lyttelton Harbour Festival of Lights flyerSaturday 18 June

  • Matariki Celebration 10am – 1pm, Albion Square: Cultural performances and music.
  • Puppets at the Port St Saviour’s Church at Holy Trinity, 10am – 2:30pm: Including favourites Liz Weir, and Natural Magic
  • Grand opening cabaret, Lyttelton Arts Factory, 7.30pm (already sold out)
  • Alliance Française Christchurch Music Festival

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Give your family Goosebumps

Cover of Classic Goosebumps CollectionI was a big fan of the Goosebumps books by R.L. Stine when I was a kid. There weren’t a lot of scary, horror stories for kids around at that stage so Goosebumps were the go-to books if you wanted to scare yourself a little. There were always plenty to choose from and they were pretty quick reads. A search of the library catalogue tells me that we have 97 Goosebumps items in our libraries, which includes paper books, eBooks, and DVDs. That’s enough Goosebumps to keep you going for quite some time!

Earlier this year there was a Goosebumps movie released in cinemas which looked really good. My family and I didn’t get a chance to see it then but I hoped that we might get it in the library eventually. While perusing the catalogue last week I discovered we did have it on order and promptly reserved it. In our house, every Saturday night is Family Movie Night, where we choose a movie that we can all enjoy. Last week it was the Goosebumps movie and it was excellent!

Cover of Revenge of the Lawn GnomesThe movie follows a kid called Zach who moves to a small town and moves in next door to R.L. Stine, the author of the Goosebumps books, and his daughter Hannah. When Zach hears screaming coming from next door one night he thinks that something horrible has happened to Hannah. He breaks in to try and rescue her but unwittingly unleashes the creatures from the Goosebumps books. The monsters that R.L. Stine made famous are real, and he protects his readers by keeping them locked in their manuscripts. One of R.L. Stine’s most evil creations, Slappy, releases the monsters one by one, and now it’s up to Zach and his friends to trap them back in their books where they belong. Jack Black plays R.L. Stine which is a perfect role for him as he’s a mix of manic and slightly crazy. The movie is the perfect mixture of funny and creepy so it’s ideal for both young and old Goosebumps fans.

Reserve the Goosebumps movie at the library now for your own family movie night. You can also check out all the other Goosebumps books and the Goosebumps TV series too.

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Noho (sit)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

noho
sit

Kia tika te noho, e te tau.
Sit properly, my darling.

Whāngahia te Reo