Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Tina (lunch)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

tina
lunch

He aha hei tina māu, e te tau?
What would you like for lunch, my darling?

Whāngahia te Reo

New Zealand Music Month 2016

May is New Zealand Music Month! Celebrate New Zealand music throughout May with Christchurch City Libraries – there’s a lovely batch of NZ Music Month events at your libraries. Subscribe to our NZ Music Month Facebook event for regular updates.

NZ Music Month

NZ Music Month launch – Sunday 1 May, 7.30pm

Kane Strang at the Christchurch Art Gallery
Sunday 1 May, 7.30pm All ages (ID required)
Tickets $15 ($20 door sales if not sold out)
Follow the Facebook event

Start NZ Music Month the right way! Dunedite Kane Strang brings the tousled charm of his off-kilter indie-rock songs to the Gallery for the evening. Support from Candice Milner and Jack Montgomery.

Photo: Loulou Callister-Baker
Photo: Loulou Callister-Baker

Free gigs at your local library

There are gigs of all sorts, including:

Here’s the full list of performances at libraries.

John Chrisstoffels: The Novel and the Theremin
John Chrisstoffels performing at WORD Christchurch. Flickr 2014-08-31-IMG_1811

Gig guide flyer
Download the NZ Music Month gig guide [1.36 MB PDF]

Alternative radio: RDU98.5FM since 1976

Celebrate 40 years of iconic Christchurch radio station, RDU98.5FM in a new exhibition at Canterbury Museum. 18 March – 14 August 2016. Find out more.

The following RDU gigs take place in NZ Music Month:

RDU Live to air
A performance by a local Christchurch musician. Special Exhibitions Hall, Canterbury Museum
Sunday 1 May, 12pm

RDU Live to air
A performance by a local Christchurch musician. Special Exhibitions Hall, Canterbury Museum
Saturday 14 May, 12pm

RDU Live to air
A performance by a local Christchurch musician. Special Exhibitions Hall, Canterbury Museum
Saturday 21 May, 12pm

RDU LIVE GIG! Kill your television
Featuring Scythes, Transistors, Salad Boys and The Bats. Canterbury Museum, Saturday 28 May from 7pm. Tickets available via dashtickets.co.nz from 2 May.

NZ music resources

NZ Music Month on Twitter

See #nzmm tweets

Some portraits of First World War service

Thumbnail Image of James Alexander AdamsThumbnail Image of Michael Ian AdamsonThumbnail Image of John Michael Winter EvansThumbnail Image of James Horne AitkenThumbnail Image of David AndersonThumbnail Image of Arthur Charles Warner BainThumbnail Image of Maxwell Stewart BainThumbnail Image of George Frederick BryantThumbnail Image of Frank Linton ButtleThumbnail Image of Edwin Grandison CochraneThumbnail Image of Sarsfield CollinsThumbnail Image of Thomas Francis DeveningThumbnail Image of Maurice DugganThumbnail Image of John ErwinThumbnail Image of William Arthur FairbairnThumbnail Image of George Weir FergusonThumbnail Image of Alfred Ernest FraserThumbnail Image of Ralph Jocelyn Gale

Monday 25 April is Anzac Day. We have added to our collection a series of photos of local men and women who served in the First World War. Each portrait links to a short biography. We will remember them.

See our biographies of local soldiers on Kete Christchurch.

Ngaio Marsh and Shakespeare

There’s a Ngaio Marsh birthday party event at Christ’s College Old Boys Theatre this Sunday 24 April. The event is a fundraiser for the Ngaio Marsh House and Heritage Trust, and includes wine, nibbles, and a talk on crime fiction by Professor Ken Strongman. Find out more on the Ngaio Marsh birthday event on Facebook.

Crime writer and theatre director Ngaio Marsh’s actual birth date is 23 April, and she shared a birthday with Shakespeare. It’s doubly appropriate – as her production of Shakespeare’s plays were widely acclaimed. This is Ngaio as Hamlet …

Baverstock, William Sykes, 1893-1975. Ngaio Marsh - Photograph taken by W S Baverstock. Dacres-Mannings, J :Photographs relating to Dame Ngaio Marsh. Ref: PAColl-0326-09. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23167157

If you want to find out more about Ngaio and Shakespeare, I recommend the splendid Inaugural Ngaio Marsh lecture – it was given on 22 April 2012 by Elric J. Hooper, MBE who appeared in several of Dame Ngaio Marsh’s acclaimed Shakespeare shows. He explains how they met (pages 10 and 11):

Three years later, in 1956, I was appearing in a student revue in the Civic Theatre and Gerald Lascelles told me that Ngaio Marsh and Charles Brash wanted to meet me. I went up to the empty stage after the performance. Two figures were standing there. The man was reticent. The woman was flamboyant. She was dressed in a handsome, three-quarter length seal skincoat. She was wearing a grey woollen skirt – not trousers. Her hair was wildly dressed. She smoked a cigarette. She asked me what I had been doing. Said Macbeth.
“Not the thane!” she said in alarm.
“No, A lord. Lennox.” I said putting her at her ease.
She mentioned that she was about to direct Lear.
A few weeks later, I auditioned for Ngaio. I was chosen to play the Fool in King Lear.
It was a memorable production with Mervyn Glue as the King, salivating so copiously that looking up into the lights one did not have to imagine the rain and storm. The costumes and set were blue grey. The set was a curved podium which a descending ramp on one side and steps down the other. In the centre was a kind of shelter for hovel. It worked extremely well.

Cast of Hamlet. Marsh, Ngaio :Photographs of theatrical productions. Ref: PA1-q-173-73-2. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23074208

His summary of Ngaio as Shakespearean director is a good one (page 10):

One of the great features of Ngaio’s Shakespeare were the moments that can only be described as “Theatrical.” Hamlet, at the end of the speech which concluded the first part, “The play’s the thing whereby I’ll catch the conscience of the King,” threw the loose sheets of the play in the air and stood there while the leaves descended around him. In Julius Caesar, hands were bathed in blood. In Lear, the eyes were ripped out.

Hamlet, produced by the University of Canterbury Drama Society and performed at the Civic Theatre [11 July 1958] CCL PhotoCD 17, IMG0039
Hamlet, produced by the University of Canterbury Drama Society and performed at the Civic Theatre [11 July 1958] CCL PhotoCD 17, IMG0039

More about Ngaio Marsh

Three New Zealanders: Ngaio Marsh

#shakespeare400 tweets

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Makawe (hair)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kupu (word)

makawe
hair

Ka heru i ō makawe, e te tau.
Brush your hair, my darling.

Whāngahia te Reo

Animals at the library

The eagle-eyed among you might have spotted a theme in our school holiday events – toy animal sleepover, making owls, snakes on a plain – yes, we will be busy with animal-themed programmes and activities.

School holiday programmes

If your kids enjoy watching the wildlife, there are plenty of books and DVDs in our collection as well as the following resources:

Animal names

Find out the words for male, female, child and groups of different types of animal.

New Zealand birds and animals

New Zealand has an amazing amount of wildlife, we’ve collected some facts and resources in New Zealand birds and animals.

Cover Cover Cover Cover Cover

National Geographic Kids

Learn about the natural world us with National Geographic Kids magazine online.

Booklists

Cover Cover Cover Cover Cover

There’s a collection of Children’s animals eAudiobooks and eBooks on OverDrive for Kids.

Want more animal stuff?

Reading to dogs

Striking Gold: Sporting achievement amidst political turmoil

Cover of Striking GoldIt’s 1976 and the Olympic games are being held in Montreal, Canada. In protest at New Zealand’s attendance at the games and ongoing sporting association with Apartheid South Africa (specifically the All Blacks continuing to tour there), many African nations refuse to take part in the games.

This was not our finest hour as a nation. So you can imagine that telling the story of a plucky band of Kiwi hockey players who achieve Olympic gold against the odds (in the final they faced an Australian team who had a 13 game winning-streak against them) – is somewhat problematic given the setting.

Fortunately in Striking gold: New Zealand hockey’s remarkable victory at the 1976 Olympics author and journalist Suzanne McFadden has done a great job of sitting the stories of these individual players in amongst both the history of hockey in New Zealand, but more importantly the political and social context of that time. In reading the book I’ve learned at least as much about the politics of the era as I have about the sport.

I asked author Suzanne McFadden a few questions about the book, and what she was hoping to achieve in writing it.

Your background is in sports journalism and you’re a self-professed fan of hockey. Was writing this book your “dream gig”?

Suzanne McFaddenIt was definitely a dream first book for me to write, in so many ways. Hockey was my sporting passion as a kid, and growing up, I was aware New Zealand had won an Olympic gold medal in hockey, but I didn’t know a lot more about the story behind it. Very few Kiwis did. As a journalist (now in my 30th year), my passion has always been people – and telling rich human interest stories. And Striking Gold is really a collection of great yarns about a bunch of great Kiwi blokes, who may have come from very different walks of life, but all shared the same passion – to win Olympic gold.

How important was it to you that you cover the social history and context in which all this was happening?

It was hugely important. I didn’t want Striking Gold to be branded as “a hockey book”, or “an Olympics book”.  I wanted it to portray an era in New Zealand where sport was still played on a purely amateur basis; where the men in the New Zealand hockey team also held down full-time jobs and helped raise young families. They had balance in their lives.

Although it was an amateur era, they were absolutely professional in their approach to the sport.  Players like Barry Maister, John Christensen and their captain, Tony Ineson, would head down to “Hospital Corner” at Hagley Park every week-day lunchtime to practise their penalty corner moves, hundreds of times over, and then return to work. It was critical, too, to describe the political backdrop, especially when New Zealand’s sporting contacts with South Africa cast such a shadow over the 1976 Olympics.

Do you think we New Zealanders have really “processed” the part our country played in the controversy of the Montreal Games? My feeling is that we seem to gloss over that period a bit.

I’ve been surprised that so many people had no idea that the All Blacks tour of South Africa in ’76 threatened to derail the Montreal Olympics.  We remember the Springbok tour protests of 1981, but the shame of 1976 is like a part of our history that we’ve conveniently extinguished.

The hockey gold medallists certainly remember it very vividly, recalling being too embarrassed to wear their New Zealand tracksuits around the athletes’ village. Some of them maintain it should have been the New Zealanders sent home from Montreal instead of the African nations who walked out.

There are some amazing things that happened to the players in this champion team.  What was your favourite story that you came across in doing research for this book?

There are so many! But one of the great finds was the Jack Lovelock letter, hidden in an old leather suitcase in Selwyn Maister’s home in Christchurch.

The letter of thanks was sent from Lovelock soon after he won his Olympic gold medal in the 1500m at the 1936 Berlin Games, addressed to Havilah Down – Maister’s grandfather who essentially ran hockey in New Zealand for 30 years. The lovely coincidence was that 40 years after that letter was sent, Maister would join Lovelock as the only two Rhode Scholars to have won an Olympic gold medal for New Zealand.

Sometimes Kiwis aren’t good about talking about their achievements as it’s considered “skiting” to some. In speaking with the players were they reticent to talk about their experiences or were they pretty forthcoming?

Initially, some of the players wondered why I would even want to write a book about a sporting tournament that happened four decades ago, and whether we would print just enough copies for them to hand out to their children and grandchildren… They are a truly humble bunch! But once they started talking, they opened up and shared some incredible memories.

They never bragged about being the best team in the world; instead they marvelled in how they came together as a perfect unit, and with a lot of hard work, skill and even a little luck, beat the world’s best.

Do you think there are other, equally extraordinary, “hidden” sports stories in New Zealand history that are waiting to be written?

Absolutely – especially from sports considered outside the mainstream. It’s just a matter of finding the time to tell them all!

If someone were interested in this period of sporting history, what books would you recommend they read?

Cover of Old heroesFor more about New Zealand’s performances at the 1976 Olympics, you can read Ivan Agnew’s book Aim High. There are some great New Zealand sports books on the 1950s and ‘60s – Arthur’s Boys by Joseph Romanos, detailing the astonishing achievements of Arthur Lydiard’s track athletes; and Old Heroes, Warwick Roger’s excellent recollection of the 1956 Springboks tour of New Zealand.

Even if your non-fiction reading doesn’t usually lean towards the sporting, I’d recommend giving Striking gold a go as it’s an engaging read that pulls you with its cast of hockey personalities, turbulent geo-politics, and unlikely twists and turns.

Win a copy of Striking Gold

We have one copy of this fascinating book to giveaway. Entry is open to Christchurch City Libraries cardholders. Simply leave a comment with your suggestion of a great sporting or history read by 5pm Friday 22 April to go in the draw. A winner will be announced on Tuesday 26 April.

More information

Library resources

Vinyl: Celebrating records and record labels

While we’re celebrating music for Record Store Day, it is worth highlighting related stuff in the Christchurch City Libraries collection. Check out our new booklist on Records and record labels (coming out this year is the much-anticipated book In Love With These Times: the Flying Nun Story by Roger Shepherd on New Zealand’s own seminal record label).

Cover Cover Cover Cover Cover

Kevin Hill’s Christchurch music images are a treasure trove. Read his book Visual memories, Audioculture’s article Where did all those cool guys go? Kevin Hill’s photos of Christchurch rock bands 1968-1980 and see his Flickr page on Christchurch rock bands.

Christchurch Music Shop - July 1975. Photo by Kevin Hill. Kete Christchurch Kevin_Hill-Christchurch_Music_Shop_1975-141.jpg
Christchurch Music Shop – July 1975. Photo by Kevin Hill. Kete Christchurch Kevin_Hill-Christchurch_Music_Shop_1975-141.jpg

The Nostalgia Black hole has some interesting info:

Once upon a time the Christchurch City Libraries did a roaring trade in loaning records – here’s a bit of a potted history of Sound recordings at Canterbury Public Library:

The lending of 7, 10 and 12 inch vinyl sound recordings began in September 1955, with a collection of 542. It consisted of “major orchestral works, chamber music, complete operas, vocal extracts from operas, full-length performances of dramas, and certain classics from the light opera and musical comedy field”, together with “a small collection of high grade recordings of first rate jazz orchestras and artists”. There was a charge of 2/6 a week for single discs and a sliding schedule for records in sets which made for a lower per disc charge for these. Twenty years later, the stock totalled 7,471, with an average of 37 added each month. Over the first year of operation issues averaged 544 a month; twenty years on it was 602. A total of 132,500 issues had been made to the end of 1975. The first stereo recordings were bought in October 1960, the first cassettes in January 1974, and the first compact discs in late 1985. The main problem in earlier years was distance from the source of supply. Soon after the commencement of the collection, import restrictions were imposed and, despite approaches to the Government by individual libraries, the New Zealand Library Association and record retailers, this situation lasted for over 25 years. The Library had a licence to import $500 worth of recordings but that didn’t go very far. There was not one good record shop in the city until the mid 1970s. Standard works were often unobtainable in these years, or took a long time. E.g, it took six years to get the first set of Bach’s Wohltemperierte Klavier and four to get Ravel’s L’heure espagnole.

See #VinylVaultFriday tweets highlighting the LPs in our collection.

More music info

Kim, Shirley Library

Record Store Day – Saturday 16 April 2016

2016 marks the 9th year of Record Store Day around the world – it’s a celebration of the culture and communities of independently run record stores. We’ve done a blog post about some great vinyl-related stuff, and a booklist of records and record labels.

Here’s our listing of Christchurch events and stuff of interest to music lovers, vinylistas, and LPistos:

Canterbury Museum

Want to see how your LPs, and EPs get made? There will be a special vinyl record cutting event on Friday 15 April at 12pm at the Canterbury Museum as part of their Exhibition “Alternative Radio: RDU98.5FM since 1976”

James Meharry from In Real Life Vinyl Mastering records special RDU selections direct to disc in a unique performance. Cutting for RDU, each session will see a double A-side 7” selected by the music director, mastered and cut to vinyl live in a special custom studio built for the vinyl lathe.

Galaxy Records

On Saturday 16 April, Galaxy Records (next to the Darkroom in Tuam Street) will be hosting Mixtape Connection vs. The Rest Home Massive on Saturday! The Mixtape & Rest Home DJs battle it out at. There will be special Record Store Day releases & goodies! Featuring on the decks: Pinacolada Soundsystem, Dr. Hitchcock, Missy G & Skew-whiff. See the Facebook event for more info.

Galaxy Records - RSD 2015
Galaxy Records – RSD 2015

Penny Lane Records

Penny Lane Records are celebrating Record Store Day Saturday 16 AND Sunday 17 April by offering super duper discount deals.

Penny Lane, RSD 2015
Penny Lane, RSD 2015

Sadhana Surfboards

I recently stumbled across second-hand records at Sadhana Surfboards at the Tannery in Woolston. They are celebrating Record Store Day on Saturday 16th with Fraser Ross & the Felt Tips playing live instore at 1:00pm. DJs from 11:30am to 4:00pm.. Limited Edition 7″, 10″ & 12″ Record Store Day Releases!

sadhana
Sadhana Surfboards

Get along and support record stores – and vinyl events – across Christchurch and New Zealand.

Bad Evil performing at Galaxy Records, RSD 2015
Bad Evil performing at Galaxy Records, RSD 2015

Upcoming music events in Christchurch

Anika Moa at Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre

Anika Moa, who is performing music from her album Songs for Bubbas 2 at Slow Boat Records in Wellington for Record Store Day is making her way down to Christchurch on Friday 22nd April and 23rd April. Get along with your tamariki to the Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre on Saturday 23 April 10:30am for her children’s concert.

NZ Music Month

Explore the NZ Music Month May events at libraries.

More on Record Store Day

Garry Knight of Penny Lane Records (in Sydenham and Eastgate Mall) says:

Record Store Day is all about celebrating the independent record store. Up against the big chains and online outlets it can be difficult to get exposure for the work that is done sourcing the hard to find product across all formats that people may not know we carry in store. Increasingly people want the tactile, flicking through bins to find treasures, experience. Retro items have become more interesting and desirable across a very broad age group, especially the vinyl records, and we are seeing a huge increase in younger people frequenting the stores again.

Dave Imlay, who runs Galaxy Records, thinks:

Record Store Day is a chance for music fans to get together in a record store, exchange ideas and share their love of music.

Southbound Records (Auckland) have produced a short video inside their shop expressing the enduring appeal of records and record shops and their love of the vinyl format. It features music by Delaney Davidson and Tami Neilson.

For more music, explore our page of music resources.

Kim, Shirley Library

Anzac Day in Christchurch and Canterbury 2016

Monday 25 April 2016 is Anzac Day. All our libraries will be closed on this public holiday. Read our page on Anzac Day and Gallipoli to find out more about this commemoration.

Commemorative services often begin before dawn with a march by returned and service personnel to the local war memorial, where they are joined by other members of the community for the Dawn Service.

Assembling for the Anzac Day Parade, 301 Halswell Road. Photo by Ellenor Waters. CCL-HP2015-EW-DSCF2940 Photo from The Halswell Project.
Assembling for the Anzac Day Parade, 301 Halswell Road. Photo by Ellenor Waters. CCL-HP2015-EW-DSCF2940 Photo from The Halswell Project.

Christchurch services and events

The following information is from Christchurch City Council:

Dawn service at Cranmer Square

  • 6am–6.15am: the people gather
  • 6.15am: the parade begins from the RSA building on Armagh Street
  • 6.30am: the service begins centred around the memorial cenotaph
  • 7.15am: the service concludes with wreath-laying

Organised by the Canterbury Branch of the Malayan Veterans Association in conjunction with the Christchurch Branch of the Royal New Zealand Returned and Services Association (RSA) and Christchurch City Council. Mayor Lianne Dalziel will lay a wreath on behalf of the citizens of Christchurch.

Citizens’ Service: 10am – ChristChurch Transitional Cathedral, Latimer Square

Organised by Christchurch City Council in conjunction with ChristChurch Cathedral and the RSA. It will be attended by representatives of the Defence Force, Consular Corps and local youth groups.

Find more Anzac Day services

The RSA website features a Find an Anzac Day service resource.

More Anzac related events

Fields of Remembrance

In 2015, the Canterbury Province Field in Cranmer Square contained 632 crosses commemorating the men and women of Christchurch who died in 1915. That number will be added to in 2016.

Field of Remembrance
Field of Remembrance, Cranmer Square [2015] Flickr 2015-03-27-IMG_6781

Exhibitions and displays

  • Canterbury Mounted Rifles regiment display – 18 to 30 April at Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre. Joe Dixon talk on the Canterbury Mounted Rifles, Tuesday 19 April, 2pm.
  • ANZAC: Photographs by Laurence Aberhart at the Canterbury Museum
  • Anzac display Brighton Gallery
  • ANZAC Commemoration Linwood Cemetery (Sunday 24 April)
  • Linwood Community Arts Centre (corner Worcester and Stanmore Road). Anzac Exhibition 2016 Monday 11 April – up to and including Anzac Day. A multi-media participatory experience on the theme, “We honour, we remember, we reflect”. Photographs, artworks, installations, talks, readings, poetry and prose, printed and audiovisual material.

Troops watering horses in the Avon River near Carlton Bridge, Christchurch [23 Sept. 1914]. CCL PhotoCD 7, IMG0069
Troops watering horses in the Avon River near Carlton Bridge, Christchurch [23 Sept. 1914]. CCL PhotoCD 7, IMG0069
Find out more: