New Zealand Fashion in Pictures: Our Image Collection

For New Zealand Fashion Week we’re sharing some of our favourite images of New Zealand fashion.

Over the years, Christchurch City Libraries has built up a collection of local images. Many of these are donated from private collections and capture the places and people of Christchurch, and Canterbury’s history. Some of these we’ve grouped into themed image collections, including one on Costume and Fashion.

Our image collection is mostly made up of early 20th century images but is less comprehensive in terms of more recent history. If you’ve got photos that you think we’d be interested in then please contact us.

In the meantime, here are some oldies but goodies in the fashion stakes –

Suits you

Members of the Christchurch Drainage Board and visitors present at the opening of the septic tank, Bromley sewage farm [4 Sept. 1905] CCL PhotoCD 2, IMG0084
Members of the Christchurch Drainage Board and visitors present at the opening of the septic tank, Bromley sewage farm [4 Sept. 1905] CCL PhotoCD 2, IMG0084
A group of Maori women dress reformers [1906] CCL PhotoCD 11, IMG0096
A group of Maori women dress reformers [1906] CCL PhotoCD 11, IMG0096
 Mr E. H. Hughes, Mr R. E. Alexander (Director of the College), and Mr Walter Macfarlane [1909] File reference P7030226
Mr E. H. Hughes, Mr R. E. Alexander (Director of the College), and Mr Walter Macfarlane [1909] Selwyn-P7030226

 The diploma winners of 1913. File reference P3051336
The diploma winners of 1913. Selwyn-P3051336

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New Zealand Fashion in pictures: Kete Christchurch

It’s New Zealand Fashion Week and here on the Christchurch City Libraries blog we’re going to be sharing some of our favourite images of New Zealand fashion.

First up are photos from Kete Christchurch, our online repository for community stories (it’s a sort of “digital shoebox” that anyone can contribute to). It’s also a great place to find images of local people through the years and sometimes they’ve got their “Sunday Best” on. Many of the best images on Kete Christchurch are from our annual Photo Hunt competition which we’ll be running again later in the year.

Have a look at some of these great ensembles. There are…

Ladies

Two Young Women
Two Young Women, 1910  (CCL Photo Hunt) / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0
Two Ladies with baskets
Two Ladies with baskets. (Kete Site Admin) / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0
Mavis Howarth, August 1935
Mavis Howarth, August 1935 (CCL Photo Hunt) / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0
Railway office staff 1958
Railway office staff 1958 (CCL Photo Hunt) / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

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Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Tangi (cry)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kiwaha (idiom)

Ki hori
Step aside

Kupu (word)

tangi
cry

Kaua e tangi, e te tau.
Don’t cry, my darling

Whāngahia te Reo

 

This week in Christchurch history (24 to 30 August)

24 August 1857
Evans Pass road over the Port Hills opens.

25 August 1920
First flight over Cook Strait (Christchurch to Trentham) by Captain Euan Dickson in a Canterbury Aviation Company plane. Read more in Peter Aimer, ‘Aviation – Early flying feats‘, Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 13-Jul-12.

Captain Euan Dickson, Mr C.H. Hewlett and Mr J.E. Moore
Captain Euan Dickson, Mr C.H. Hewlett and Mr J.E. Moore. This photograph is held at Archives New Zealand as part of the New Zealand National Airways Corporation series. Archives Reference: AEPK W2774 19953 Box 1 35 (R11174482). Flickr, Archives New Zealand Some rights reserved.

26 August 1939
Official opening of City Council’s pensioner housing project in Barnett Avenue, Sydenham; the first local body pensioner housing in New Zealand.

28 August 1890
“Great maritime strike” (the first of New Zealand’s 3 major waterfront strikes) spreads to Lyttelton.

More August events in the Christchurch chronology: a timeline of Christchurch events in chronological order from pre-European times to 1989.

From Kip to Glen

Envelope. Addressed to Glen Morgan Esq. Rangiora. New Zealand. Date stamp 4 Oct 1942
Envelope. Addressed to Glen Morgan Esq. Rangiora. New Zealand. Date stamp 4 Oct 1942. ANZC Archives, CCL-C81111945-001

They were signed off Howard, or more informally Kip, and most were written to his friend Glen Morgan in Rangiora. Nothing particularly remarkable in that, at first sight, but Kip was in fact Howard Kippenberger, who historian Glyn Harper has described as “New Zealand’s most popular military commander, and perhaps its most talented.”

His letters and cards, which have recently been added to our digitised collection, span the period from 22 February 1940 to 18 February 1945 and offer a fascinating insight in the life of New Zealand soldiers in World War II.

752/11. Christmas 1942. Card to Glen from Howard from the Middle East. Sent in October.
Christmas 1942. Card to Glen from Howard from the Middle East. ANZC Archives, CCL-C81111945-042

We meet Kippenberger in Egypt, where he is in charge of the 20th Canterbury/Otago Battalion, and where he experiences “the most bitter disappointment of my life” as a result of the lack of involvement of his Battalion in the routing of the Italians from Egypt.

We then follow him to Syria, where he is commanding all the troops in the Aleppo area, including some French, Syrian and British soldiers, and where he is dealing with the local Governor and the French delegate.

Lastly we move to the UK, where we find out that Kippenberger “will be starting to learn to walk again soon“, having lost both feet in an anti-personnel mine accident near Monte Cassino.

Kippenberger’s personal experiences are interesting per se, but the letters offer much more.

My romantic streak was sparked by descriptions of the living quarters:

You will imagine us on the Libyan frontier, sweltering in the desert, close to action.

Well we’re not, at the moment. We’re doing important enough work and having an interesting time, but living in near luxury. My H.Q. are in the Kasr el Nil Barracks. I occupy part of the old Khedivial palace, sharing two rooms with a Scots Guards Major, having meals on a mahogany table on the balcony above the Nile, a charming scene with moonlight on the river, candles & palms.

Similarly, I was intrigued by Kippenberger’s depiction of a captured Italian general:

He has been moaning like a bull at his perfectly good treatment …has been hunger striking & generally acting like a goat.

And who couldn’t be touched by the following vignettes of the soldiers’ lives in his letter of 7 December 1940?

Censoring letters the other day I came on this. One boy writing to his girl friend described how he’d  saved his water allowance for days until he had enough for a bath.

Pete Smart managed to get tight last night & for reasons clearer to him then than later decided to … stay the night [at a friends’ camp] & arrived back this morning …wearing a dishevelled & shame-faced look.

And, of course, some things never change, as this comment about the frustration of not taking part in the battle against the Italians in December 1940, demonstrates:

Only consolation is that the Aussies aren’t in it either.

View all of Kippenberger’s letters and cards, including his trenchant overview of Political systems, 1940s style.

3D printing parts – Hover board lifts off

Science_Project_2up_Web

Luka is a Year 7 student from Cobham Intermediate. Luka has entered his home built “Hover board” which utilises Maglev (Magnetic Levitation) technology into a school science fair. He was encountering some issues with one of the housings holding the magnets. He 3D modelled himself a new design using Google SketchUp and contacted us to see if we could 3D print the parts for him.

We jumped at the chance to help. Luka’s project is amazing; we are glad that we are able to assist as this is why we embraced 3D printing in the first place. It allows our customers access to technology that they may not normally be able to utilise.

At this stage there is not a specific system or pricing structure in place for customer 3D printing, but with enquiries ramping up, we will be working on it. Watch this space.

If you want to see something really inspiring, here is a clip of Luka’s hover board in action:

Danny McNeil
South Learning Centre

Know thyself – New Zealand eBooks with Wheelers

KTT WheelersWhen I came back from London I remember sitting down to watch TV and laughing quietly to myself when there was an ad for chainsaws. It reminded me yet again that being a New Zealander is actually a thing – we do exist with our own culture and character. Why this should continue to be such a revelation to me was largely due to growing up and being told that I am “Irish, Scottish and English”. I can’t really remember being told I was a New Zealander until I actually went to Ireland, Scotland and England. They were under no illusion that I was one of theirs and I had the visa restrictions to prove it.

One way to absorb, enjoy and learn about New Zealand’s unique culture is through its fiction and non-fiction. This is where Wheelers comes in with eBook titles by New Zealanders or about New Zealand. We can learn to be better parents with psychologist Nigel Latta (a native of Oamaru), or contemplate the loss of life in the Tragedy at Pike River Mine by Rebecca Macfie. If it is escape we seek then we can lose ourselves in the historical fiction of Jenny Pattrick or Deborah Challinor.

While all Kiwi kids should know the names Mahy, Cowley and Lasenby.

Cover of Magpie HallWheelers continues to promote New Zealand authors with our Community Read making Magpie Hall by Rachael King universally available.

So regardless of your ancestral background if you have grown up in these shaky isles you will find stories familiar to your heart in Wheeler’s local content – a welcome reminder that we are New Zealanders and we are home.

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Au (to be sound)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kiwaha (idiom)

Ehara i te tī
You only live once

Kupu (word)

au
sound (of sleep)

I au tō moe, e te tau?
Did you have a good sleep, my darling?

Whāngahia te Reo

 

This week in Christchurch history (17 to 23 August)

17 August 1903
City abattoir opens at Sockburn.

19 August 1840
Cover of French AkaroaFrench settlers land at Akaroa.

19 August 1859
Chamber of Commerce established in Lyttelton.

20 August 1984
A longterm aim of banning open fires is approved by the Christchurch City Council.

22 August 1910
Ilam homestead (on the site of the present university staff club) destroyed by fire.

Ilam House, Riccarton [ca. 1921]
Ilam House, Riccarton [ca. 1921], CCL PhotoCD 12, IMG0019
22 August 1925
Radio Broadcasting Company of N.Z. incorporated in Christchurch – the country’s first public radio company. The company became the major force in early radio, eventually owning and operating a chain of YA stations throughout the country.

3YA Christchurch Station of the Radio Broadcasting Company of New Zealand [1927]
3YA Christchurch Station of the Radio Broadcasting Company of New Zealand [1927], CCL PhotoCD 3, IMG0057
More August events in the Christchurch chronology: a timeline of Christchurch events in chronological order from pre-European times to 1989.

New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults 2015

Last night was one of the most important dates on the New Zealand children’s literature calendar: the night when the winners of the New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults for 2015 were announced and celebrated.

We are thrilled to join in congratulating these great authors and their fantastic books:

Margaret Mahy Book of the Year and Young Adult Book Award

Singing home the whale by Mandy Hager

Picture Book Award

Jim’s letters by Glyn Harper and Jenny Cooper

Junior Fiction Award

Monkey boy by Donovan Bixley

Non-fiction Award

Mōtītī Blue and the oil spill by Debbie McCauley

Best First Book

Māori art for kids by Julie Noanoa and Norm Heke

Maori Language Award

Ngā kī Sacha Cotter and Joshua Morgan, translated by Kawata Teepa

Cover of Singing Home The Whale Cover of Jim's Letters Cover of Monkey Boy Cover of Motiti Blue and the Oil Spill Cover of Maori Art for Kids Cover of Nga Ki

Children’s Choice Award Winners

This year children were given the opportunity to choose the finalists as well as casting the vote for the winners.  Nearly 16,000 votes were cast and these are the winners:

Picture Book

The Anzac puppy by Peter Millett & Trish Bowles

Junior Fiction

The island of lost horses by Stacy Gregg

Non-Fiction

The letterbox cat & other poems by Paula Green & Myles Lawford

Young Adult Fiction

Night vision by Ella West

Cover of The Anzac Puppy Cover of The Island of Lost Horses Cover of The letterbox cat & Other Poems Cover of Night Vision

Have you read any of these books? Do you agree with the judges’ choices?