Te Rerenga Kōrero – Koia kei a koe

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori – The Māori Language Commission publish weekly Māori phrases that can be used to support or cheer someone on.

Koia kei [a koe]/[a Sonny/Nehe/Māmā]!
You’re great. You/Sonny/Nehe/Mum really nailed it!

akina te reo rugby

Te Rerenga Kōrero – Kei reira/konā!

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori – The Māori Language Commission publish weekly Māori phrases that can be used to support or cheer someone on.

Kei reira/konā!
Right on! That’s the one!

akina te reo rugby

Te Rerenga Kōrero – Irā

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori – The Māori Language Commission publish weekly Māori phrases that can be used to support or cheer someone on.

Irā!
Look at that!

akina te reo rugby

Wā kōrero ki te kainga – Storytimes at home

Ko tēnei te wiki o te reo Māori (it’s Māori Language Week) and throughout our network of libraries the usual preschool storytime sessions for this week will have added te reo Māori content.

If you attended a session and want to try adding some te reo Māori stories at home, or if you missed out and want to give it a go yourself here’s a list of recommended titles for introducing some linguistic variety into your child’s storytime repertoire.

Cover of Te hua tuatahi a KuwiTe hua tuatahi a Kuwi  by Katherine Merewether

Kuwi the Kiwi has never had an egg before, so she’s unsure how to look after it. When the egg gets a crack Kuwi thinks that the egg is broken, but she’s in for a surprise.

Kanohi – My Face by Kitty Brown

One of a series of te reo board books. Read our interview with author Kitty Brown.

Cover of Rhyme & reoRhyme & Reo: Aeiou: A Fun Way to Learn Māori Vowel Sounds by Jessica Ngatai

“This book is an educational resource to help teachers, parents whanau and children build confidence to use and enjoy te reo. Illustrated and featuring quirky Kiwi poems, weaving reo through the English text, with explanatory notes on the pronunciation of the vowel sounds appearing on a side-bar on each page”

Cover of Māori art for kidsMāori Art for Kids by Julie Noanoa

This collection of 15 projects offers children aged 7 and over a range of unique Māori art experiences. Practical skills cover sculpture, photography, design, paint, mixed media, collage and more. Easy-to-follow instructions include illustrations of the steps involved, using everyday craft materials, recycled and found objects. Examples of taonga (treasures) created by leading contemporary artists are shown alongside each project with a brief explanation of the object, its purpose and use in the past and present.

Cover of Hoiho pakuHoiho paku by Stephanie Thatcher

“An endearing story about a penguin called Little Hoiho who wants to be more like the other birds she sees around her, Kotuku, Toroa, and Tui. But Little Hoiho learns that her body is made for swimming and spinning and twisting in the water, and that she is perfect just the way she is”

E oma, moko kākāriki by Gay Hay

A rare Wellington green gecko is wary of predators and runs to safety. Includes factual information about green geckos, their behaviour and life cycle, and traditional Māori beliefs about geckos.

Cover of Mahi tahiMahi tahi by Sharon Holt

A song (with book and CD) about working, playing and interacting together. Read our interview with author Sharon Holt.

E hoki Flash by Ruth Paul

Follows the adventures of mischievous dog Flash who escapes from home and gets up to all sorts of antics, chasing cats, sneaking into cars, rolling in rubbish.

Cover of Nā wai te waka i totohu?Nā wai te waka i totohu? by Pamela Allen

The reader is invited to guess who causes the boat to sink when five animal friends of varying sizes decide to go for a row.

Hairy Maclary no te teri a Tanarahana by Lynley Dodd

When Hairy Maclary and his canine friends go for a walk and encounter Scarface Claw, the toughest Tom in town, they run away

Cover of Te TanguruhauTe Tanguruhau by Julia Donaldson

The Māori language version of the children’s picture book, The Gruffalo. A clever mouse uses the threat of a terrifying creature to keep from being eaten by a fox, an owl, and a snake, only to have to outwit that creature as well.

Kei reira ngā weriweri by Maurice Sendak

When Max wears his wolf suit and makes mischief, he is sent to bed without his supper. But in his room a forest grows and Max sails to the land of the wild things where he becomes their king.

Cover of Taniwha, taniwhaTaniwha, Taniwha by Robyn Kahukiwa

An adventure with Supa Heroes, Maui and Hina

Kei te toro haere mātou by Katie Kool

Simple adventures of family life with Charlie the dog. From the series Beginning to read with Charlie.

Cover of Ko wai e huna anaKo wai e huna ana? by Satoru Ōnishi

“Simple sentences, counting, colours, recognising emotion, the names of animals, beginner-level te reo Māori for children and learners.”

He tuatara by Carolyn Collis

Reader for children in Māori. Looks at a tuatara. From the Early Te Reo Reading Book series.

Cover of Te anuhe tino hiakaiTe anuhe tino hiakai by Eric Carle

Follows the progress of a hungry little caterpillar as he eats his way through a varied and very large quantity of food until, full at last, he forms a cocoon around himself and goes to sleep. Good for learning different words for food.

Waiata

Cover of Mahi tahiMahi tahi by Sharon Holt

A song (with book and CD) about working, playing and interacting together. Read our interview with author Sharon Holt.

Songs for Bubbas 2 by Anika Moa

Catchy music for preschoolers with some te reo Māori.

Cover of Waiata maiWaiata mai sing along with Aunty Bea

Book with audio CD (Music by Aunty Bea & Rodger Cunningham)

Hush: A Kiwi Lullaby by Joy Cowley

The traditional lullaby ‘Hush Little Baby’, retold with a strong New Zealand flavour. A baby is promised a series of items including a woolly sheep, kowhai flowers and singing tui.

McLeans Mansion

McLeans Mansion is front page news in today’s copy of The Press (7 July 2016). This slightly spooky architectural jewel (also known as Holly Lea) has an interesting history:

The Mansion was a departure from the accustomed work of the architects, England Brothers, and it was an unusual design among Christchurch’s large homes — when built it was reputed to be the largest wooden residence in New Zealand. The most remarkable thing about the Mansion is surely that it was built for a 78 year-old bachelor and that it was used as a private residence for only 13 years.

McLeans Mansion, 387 Manchester Street, Christchurch ca. 1900
McLeans Mansion, 387 Manchester Street, Christchurch ca. 1900 CCL Photo Collection 22, Img02343

In 1899, 78-year old bachelor and former Waikakahi runholder, Allan McLean (1822-1907), employed Robert West England (1863-1908) as architect for a Jacobean-style, three-storeyed wooden house of 53 rooms. It was completed in 1900 and McLean named it Holly Lea. At 23,000 square feet, it was probably the largest wooden residence in New Zealand. It was used as a private home for only 13 years. Over the years it has been a home (until 1955) for genteel women down on their luck, unable to be accommodated with women of a lower socio-economic background as it was felt the two groups would not get on; a dental nurses’ hostel; a Salvation Army rest home; leased for a time by the St Vincent de Paul Society. In 2005 it became the home of Academy New Zealand, Christchurch, a private training establishment offering entry level vocational training.

George LeBrun up ladder at McLean's Mansion. Kete Christchurch PH14-SaSe-George_LeBrun_up_ladder_at_McLean_Institute_building_Manchester_St_ChCh.jpg
George LeBrun up ladder at McLean’s Mansion. Kete Christchurch PH14-SaSe-George_LeBrun_up_ladder_at_McLean_Institute_building_Manchester_St_ChCh.jpg

More McLeans reading

The Dead Lands: Making a movie in te reo Māori

I’ve studied a few languages over the years including te reo Māori and one thing my teachers always encouraged was watching films in the language as it helped develop an ear for what native speakers sound like, as well as helping with vocabulary and grammar. In fact, this is how I first discovered Jackie Chan movies when I was learning Chinese.

Learners of te reo Māori are lucky enough to have Māori Television as a resource for hearing te reo Māori spoken, even if no one else in their household, school or place of work is fluent. But in terms of Saturday night movies on DVD, there’s very little to choose from.

t’s not difficult to find movies with a sprinkling of te reo Māori, here and there – films like Whale rider, BoyThe Piano and a few others. But a movie where the only English language you’ll find is in the subtitles? Now, that is a rarity – but that’s exactly what you get with 2014 action movie, The Dead Lands.

With impressively gory deaths and terrific fight choreography The Dead Lands is sort of a cross between Apocalypto, (Mel Gibson’s brutal Meso-American set action film), a Bruce Lee movie, and a mafia revenge drama. It’s closest cinematic equivalent in New Zealand terms might be the Geoff Murphy directed classic, Utu.

Director Toa Fraser, was good enough to answer a few questions for me about the te reo Māori aspect of the film.

Toa Fraser on set
Director Toa Fraser on set with actor James Rolleston. Photo credit: Matt Klitscher

Why was the decision made to have the dialogue in te reo, rather than in English? How do you think it added to the film?

Honestly, we just thought it would be much cooler to do it in te reo. Glenn Standring always wrote it to be translated. Te Manahau Morrison wrote a beautiful translation, very heightened and theatrical that the cast found thrilling and challenging. It suited the fact that we were making an indigenous martial arts movie that looked to Hollywood but also to Asia for inspiration. Kurosawa was a particular inspiration.

Did this require the actors, or you, to learn more te reo?

The cast had a very varied level of confidence in te reo. We did cast it in such a way that people like Te Kohe Tuhaka and Raukura Turei could lead within the group, and guide the others who were less confident. For me I don’t speak te reo so of course it was very challenging but I had great support from Tainui Stephens and Jamus Webster.

Are there specific challenges with making a movie completely in te reo Maori or is it pretty much the same as making one in English?

It was a joy to make a movie that embraced tikanga Māori as a paramount part of the process. We said karakia everyday, used Māori terms onset (e.g. tīmata/kōkiri for action, kāti for cut).

I still say “kāti” on set. I directed an episode of Penny Dreadful in Ireland last year with Eva Green and Rory Kinnear. Rory said, “We just keep going until you say kāti.”

What are your thoughts on the use of te reo Māori, generally?

I look forward to the day when we are all comfortable in New Zealand/Aotearoa speaking English and Māori as much as we can, and all schools are equally well-resourced for English and Māori language education. I think it is ridiculous that, for instance, a very well-resourced central Auckland school has some 15, 000 books in English, a few in Japanese, one French and erm, some in Māori. What’s that about?

Languages are cool. Let’s celebrate them.

Find out more

Ngā Rorohiko (electric brains) and more Te Reo Māori in the library

Kia ora. Here are some resources to help you find what library things are called in Māori.

Te reo Maori cards

Bicultural signage at Christchurch City Libraries Ngā Kete Wānanga O-Ōtautahi has the library-related word or phrase in English, with an MP3 sample of it in te reo Māori, and a more descriptive explanation of the meaning.

For example:

Computers Descriptive: Electric brains Ngā Rorohiko Ngā Ro-ro-hi-ko
Self Issue Descriptive: It is for you to despatch Māu e Tuku Mā-u e Tu-ku

For more library words in te reo, try Bilingual signs list from He Puna: a Maori language resource for librarians compiled by Hinureina Mangan & Chris Szekely. This useful resource compiles words, subjects, and terms from libraries all around Aotearoa – from Abstracts “kupu arahi” to the Young Adult section “te wāhanga ki te hunga taiohi“.

I can see the following coming in handy:

  • take aronui – hot topics
  • pukapuka hou – new books

All our libraries have names in Te Reo Māori, and you can borrow your books on the Māu e Tuku in Te Reo Māori.

Te Reo Māori self checkout

Go to our Te Wiki O Te Reo Māori post for more information on Māori Language Week.

Te Rerenga Kōrero – Kia kaha e hoa mā

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori – The Māori Language Commission publish weekly Māori phrases that can be used to support or cheer someone on.

Kia kaha e hoa mā!
Let’s go team!

akina te reo rugby

Pukapuka for pepi – Kitty Brown talks about Te Reo Māori board books

Kitty Brown and Kirsten Parkinson are cousins who’ve worked together on creating brilliant bilingual board books in te reo Māori and English with Reo Pepi. Kitty is here in Ōtautahi, and is presenting a special Storytimes / Wā Kōrero at New Brighton Library on Tuesday 5 July for Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori. We had a kōrero with her.

Kitty Brown

Kitty and her whānau are in Ōtautahi for a while, visiting their granny who lives in New Brighton. Her husband and son Tama are now living in a housebus and Christchurch is the first stop in their plan to visit places and be location free. Her co-author Kirsten is a dance teacher and has a Fine Arts degree – as Kitty says “she works fulltime, she’s got 3 kids, she’s a major overachiever!”

Tell us a bit about the special Storytimes / Wā Kōrero you are doing at New Brighton Library on Tuesday 5 July.

I will do our three – they are really fun to read:

  • Karahehe (Animals) – animal noises
  • Kanohi (My face) – everyone can play along with finding parts of face
  • Kākahu (Getting dressed) – play with pretending to get dressed up

CoverI will also do a selection of my faves. I am a huge fan of reading aloud. One favourite is Taniwha taniwha by Robyn Kahukiwa which she wrote for her moko (grandchildren). I will also do a couple of waiata. Tama and I go along to the one at New Brighton Library so I know how it rolls and I know what not to do!

What gave you the idea of doing bilingual books?

Kirsten and I both had pepi at the same time – Mihi is only about four months younger than Tama. We were both on maternity leave at the same time, and we’re cousins. We live around the corner from each other; we are really close – then we had babies and we needed to really reconnect with our reo ourselves. We thought what better time to do it than with our own pepi – they are learning to speak, we’re learning to speak. But what happened is we couldn’t find many resources. There’s not enough, and there’s not enough beautiful resources. There’s not enough durable, chewable books that we can share with our pepi after you’ve used every one at the library and you’re getting the same ones out again. We just saw that there was a lack.

We had the same idea. She started drawing, and I started researching text. We’d probably still be doing that now if it wasn’t for the support of Te Pūtahitanga. They gave us startup money to publish our pukapuka.

What role does the library play for you and your whānau?

The library in Dunedin to us is quite important to our lives. Libraries are integral. We had a lovely email from a whānau who had found the Kanohi book at their local library. They sent us a photograph of their daughter and she had the same hat on that’s in the book. Because it’s in the pukapuka that she got from the library she’s wanting to wear this hat all the time.

Libraries are really important so that those resources get to the whānau. For us going to the library and getting the books out from the Māori section is important – we’re really proud to be contributing to that section to make sure it has more resources and whānau find new things there. You can never have too many books.

Are there any books or resources you’d recommend if you want your tamaraki and whānau to be bilingual?

We really like Carolyn Collis. I like the sentence structures that she uses.  We try to make our reo everyday. I also like NZ books that integrate a little bit of te reo. Also:
Peter Gossage
Robyn Kahukiwa
Gavin Bishop

CoverWhat are you currently reading?

Māori made easy by Scotty Morrison. Thirty minutes a day, sort of like a prescription.

What next for you and Reo Pepi?

We are inspired by our tamariki again. They are just reaching for new concepts and we’re just following what they do. Kirsten has completed the illustrations for a second set of three pukapuka. The second set should be ready to go for the new educational year in February:

  • Kaute / Counting – illustrated with toys from the rooms of our tamariki
  • Ngā Tae / Colours – illustrated with insects
  • Kai  / Food – illustrated with tamariki enjoying kai (market testing unanimously picked kai as the third topic!)

After that there will be a third set of 3 books. We are looking into additional resources like posters and wall charts.

We’re going to the IBBY International Congress in August. We are going to have a stall there.  It’s majorly exciting – we’ll be going to Joy Cowley’s 80th birthday at Auckland Library!

Cover Cover

If you are flying to Auckland or elsewhere, you might spot Kitty and Kirsten’s Reo Pepi mentioned in the latest Air New Zealand Kia ora magazine!

Remembering a disastrous day – The Battle of the Somme

The Battle of the Somme lasted from July to November 1916. The New Zealand Division became involved on 15 September at Flers-Courcelette, which was their first major action on the Western Front.

New Zealand trench mortar officers on the Somme. Royal New Zealand Returned and Services' Association :New Zealand official negatives, World War 1914-1918. Ref: 1/2-013112-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.New Zealand trench mortar officers on the Somme. Royal New Zealand Returned and Services' Association :New Zealand official negatives, World War 1914-1918. Ref: 1/2-013112-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23130341
New Zealand trench mortar officers on the Somme. Royal New Zealand Returned and Services’ Association :New Zealand official negatives, World War 1914-1918. Ref: 1/2-013112-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23130341

While the casualty figures for the whole battle are horrendous for all nations involved, those for the opening day of the battle for the British Army and Newfoundland forces are truly staggering – over 57,000 wounded and more than 19,000 killed. It was truly a disastrous day and only the Fall of Singapore in 1942 saw more casualties for the British Army – although the majority of those were prisoners of war.

What makes 1 July even more devastating is that so many British and Newfoundland soldiers were going into action for the first time, many in what were known as Pals Battalions where men from local communities joined up together. Not surprisingly, this had disastrous consequences for these communities which were often in working class, industrial areas.

There are a couple of excellent and contrasting histories of this day. Martin Middlebrook’s First Day on the Somme is a classic military history which looks in great depth at the formation of the British units on the Somme and tells the story of the battle through the of a number of soldiers. Andrew Macdonald’s recent First Day of the Somme explores in great detail how the battle plan evolved and analyses the tactics of the army formations involved to show how they failed or partially succeeded.

Cover Cover

Over the next few days and months I will be thinking of those who fought on 1 July and throughout the rest of the battle, in particular the 7th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment who went into action near Fricourt late on 2 July.

Do you have any connection to the first day of the Somme, 1 July 1916?

Our newspaper and magazine archives are a great way to explore historic events as they unfold. Log in with your library card number and password / PIN.