Cook Islands Language Week 2015

Hibiscus flowerCook Islands Language Week – Te ‘Epetoma o Te Reo Kūki ‘Āirani celebrates the languages spoken by the people of the Cook Islands; Cook Islands Māori, the Western Polynesian language Pukapuka, and the distinctive mixture of Cook Islands Māori and English spoken by the people of Palmerston Island.

In 2015 Cook Islands Language week will take place from 3 – 9 August. The theme for Cook Islands Language week this year is –

To tatou reo tupuna e korona ia no to tatou matakeinanga

Our language is a crowning glory of our community

2015 is also the Cook Islands’ 50th year anniversary of self-governance in free association with New Zealand.

Celebrate at Christchurch City Libraries

Cook Islands Māori Storytimes at Aranui Library

In conjunction with the Ministry of Pacific Island Affairs, Aranui Library will be hosting a community event in the form of a Cook Islands Māori Language themed storytime on Thursday 6 August, 11am-11.30am.

Our Resources

Check out our Cook Islands Language Week page for sound files of basic Cook Islands Māori greetings and words.

Cover of Cook Islands Māori alphabet bookSearch our catalogue for Cook Islands Language resources –

This week in Christchurch history (3 to 9 August)

4 August 1878
Severe snowstorm over the South Island.

4 August 1923
Railway to the West Coast opens. The much delayed opening of the Otira tunnel on June 18, 1918, had prevented earlier completion of the line.

6 August 1867
Unveiling of the Godley statue in Cathedral Square New Zealand’s first public statue. However, the statue’s inscription acclaiming him ”founder of Canterbury“ is possibly over generous. Wakefield should at least share the title.

John Robert Godley statue at the Quake City exhibition, Friday 15 February 2013
John Robert Godley statue at the Quake City exhibition, Friday 15 February 2013. Flickr CCL-2013 -02-15-IMG_3592

7 August 1982
Opening of City Mall, a major new pedestrian amenity created by the closure of parts of Cashel and High Streets. The project had first been mooted in 1967.

8 August 1989
Christchurch Central MP and Deputy Prime Minister, Geoffrey Palmer appointed as Prime Minister after resignation of David Lange.  See some photos from his career on DigitalNZ.

Prime Minister Geoffrey Palmer and his wife Margaret, Premier House, Wellington
Prime Minister Geoffrey Palmer and his wife Margaret, Premier House, Wellington – Photograph taken by Ross Giblin. Further negatives of the Evening Post newspaper. Ref: EP/1990/2349/20-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23121901

9 August 1840
Captain Langlois in the “Compte de Paris” arrives in Pigeon Bay with 63 French settlers.

More August events in the Christchurch chronology: a timeline of Christchurch events in chronological order from pre-European times to 1989.

The shipboard diary of Henry Bottle

Ship Himalaya
HIMALAYA. [picture] : 1008 tons. Built at Sunderland. Sold to America and renamed Star of Peru. Brodie Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection, State Library of Victoria.
In 1879 a young man named Henry Garmston Bottle undertook a great, but not uncommon journey from London to Lyttelton aboard the Himalaya.

He kept a diary while on board, and wrote several letters to his family back in England, to his father (My dear Papa), his sister Nellie and his brother Fred.

His shipboard diary is largely an unsentimental and factual account but it nevertheless conjures up fascinating images and vignettes of life onboard ship for months at a time. The following are some excerpts from his shipboard diary which covers 11 January – 14 April 1879.

21st – Vessel rolled very much when at breakfast the whole table was cleared and some things broken, running down coast of Portugal, pigs got loose had a spree.

24th – Heavy gale during night could not sleep. Off Str of Gibralter, went on deck & got drenched from head to foot by a sea, about 1ft of water in our cabin.

25th – Pig died, thrown overboard, saw a shark eat it

8th – Lat 4 Long 22 N Heat 96. 97 miles killed a rat in our cabin, slept on deck

Unsurprisingly there’s an awful lot of people being sick to start with and a surprising number of animal escapees including one passenger’s canary.

My dear Papa, letter from Henry Bottle to his fatherSimilarly his letters offer a glimpse into the “excitements” of life on board the Himalaya like this description of bad weather in a letter to his father dated 10 February 1879 –

We had a heavy gale yesterday morning it came on all at once & the wind blew & it rained as I never saw it before it came down in streams like pailfulls we all took our shoes & stockings off rolled our trousers up put macktos [mackintoshes] on, no hat & went on deck to catch water we caught a good lot. The gale lasted an hour.

You can read more about Henry Bottle’s journey and his life in Oamaru and Waimate in his digitised papers.

Quick questions with Margaret Wilson

Cover of The Struggle for SovereigntyMargaret Wilson is coming to Christchurch on Sunday 30 August to speak on The Struggle for Sovererignty. This event is part of the Shifting Points of View – WORD Christchurch at the Christchurch Arts Festival.  Margaret is Professor of Law and Public Policy at the University of Waikato, and she has been an MP and Speaker of Parliament. She will be in conversation with Dr Bronwyn Hayward, author and political scientist at the University of Canterbury.

This session is timely and relevant:

In the era of public choice and free markets, and when widespread public protest against global treaties such as the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement is having little effect, does the New Zealand state still have the best interests of its individual citizens at heart? Margaret Wilson argues that the shift to a neo-liberal public policy framework has profoundly affected the country’s sovereignty and that New Zealanders must continue to engage in the struggle to retain it for the sake of individual and community wellbeing.

Thanks to Margaret for answering our quick questions.

What are you looking forward to doing in Christchurch?

I’m looking forward to meeting people in Christchurch who share my values.

What do you think about libraries?

Libraries are essential for a democratic community – they provide pleasure, knowledge and well being for a community. (My sister is a librarian!)

What would be your “desert island book”?

I would take the bible and the Koran to try understand why religion is so important to so many people.

Share a surprising fact about yourself.

If I had the time and money I would tour the world watching cricket.

Learning te reo Māori – Te Wiki o te Reo Māori – Rāpare

Karawhiua! Kōrero Māori.

Ngā Kete Wānanga o Ōtautahi has a range of te reo Māori resources to help you with your te reo Māori learning.
Cover from Rhyme & Reo  Cover for Launch yourself into Te Reo Māori Cover of He Whakarārama

Whether you are a visual learner or love to write, write and write some more or even if your best learning is done by listening, there is he pukapuka for you to enjoy and discover.

If you like to stay connected then our Te Ao Māori page on our website will keep you engaged for a very very long time. Take a moment (you may need several) to immerse yourself with our online resource Te Whata Raki – learn about Te Ao Māori in a graphically beautiful and bilingual space. New content has just been added as well.

Snapshot from web page of Te Whata Raki

Mā te kimi ka kite, mā te kite ka mōhio, mā te mōhio ka mārama!
Seek and discover, discover and know, know and become enlightened!

Have you a favourite learning tool for Te Reo Māori?

Kōreroreo mai.

New Zealand writer Anna Smaill is on the Man Booker Prize longlist

We’re all very excited to hear New Zealand author Anna Smaill is on the longlist for the Man Booker Prize for her book The Chimes. I’ve read it, and loved it. It’s a dystopia, yes, and also timeless and full of history, music and atmosphere:

You can hear Anna talk in Christchurch at a WORD Christchurch session Imaginary Cities, on Sunday 30 August along with Fiona Farrell, Anna Smaill, Hamish Clayton, and Hugh Nicholson  (chaired by Christchurch Art Gallery’s senior curator Lara Strongman). It’s part of a Shifting points of view season in the Christchurch Arts Festival.

Masha interviewed Anna at the Auckland Writers Festival – read her interview Anna Smaill – from a writing musician to a musical writer:

The first impulse is the sense of time going past. It’s almost having the experience of pathos in the moment, having feeling of something happening that is already gone. I’ve always had very acutely this feeling of things being transient and ephemeral and I wanted to capture them.

I definitely think the impulse to write first came from that. Of course it is also a way of working things out for me. Just to process my experiences, work out what I think about things. It always seemed a necessary thing to me. And also it’s a great entertainment.

And just the other day Anna answered some quick questions.

Best of luck, Anna.

Countdown to National Poetry Day 2015

National Poetry Day 2015 logoPens to paper (or fingers to keyboard)! There is only one month until National Poetry Day on Friday 28 August. Several poetry competitions are currently open but with submission dates that end in the next few weeks (with winners generally being announced on National Poetry Day).

There are several nationwide poetry competitions this year as well as one for Christchurch poets.

Nationwide Poetry Competitions

Christchurch Poetry Competition

Hagley Writers’ Institute National Poetry Day Competition – Open to current and previous students at Hagley Writers’ Institute. (Submission Dates: 25 July – 7 August 2015)

Christchurch Poetry Event

0800 Muse – Kickstarting the poem: A public workshop to get you in touch with your muse. Open to all. Meet at 1oam for morning tea. The workshop will run from 10.30am-12pm, followed by the announcement of The Hagley Writers’ Institute National Poetry Day competition winners and celebratory readings from competition winners, Frankie McMillan (judge), Kerrin P Sharpe, Christina Stachurski, Bernadette Hall and more.

Date: Saturday 29 August, 10am – 1pm

Place: The Writers’ Block, Hagley College, Hagley Avenue.

Bookings: Registration required. Register by August 27th. For further information and workshop registration contact Morrin Rout, Director – Hagley Writers’ Institute. email writers@hagley.school.nz, (03) 329 9789 or 021 046 4189

Poetry Resources

Need inspiration? Check out our poetry resources

Quick questions with Anna Smaill

Cover of The ChimesAnna Smaill, author of the wonderful moody and musical dystopian novel The Chimes, is coming to Christchurch.

She is speaking on the panel Imaginary Cities as part of WORD Shifting Points of view in the Christchurch Arts Festival.

Thanks to Anna for answering our quick questions.

What are you looking forward to doing in Christchurch?

Both my parents grew up in Christchurch, so we often came down for family holidays and I have many childhood memories of the city, as well as more recent ones from the two years I spent there as a student. However, I haven’t visited properly since the earthquake. What I really want to do is simply walk around for a few hours, visiting and remembering old places, but also taking in the changes and the new landscape and life of the city.

What do you think about libraries?

Libraries are lifeblood! We grew up within walking distance of our local library (Leys Institute in Ponsonby), and for my sister, brother and me it was variously a source of entertainment, education, after-school care and, finally, employment (we each worked there as shelvers then library assistants).

I always feel happy in libraries. They seem like places of equality and wondrous possibility – built around this essential humanist ideal that everyone deserves access to knowledge and literature. Now I take my daughter to Newtown Library in Wellington, and to Wellington Central, and it’s great to feel that connection starting up again.

What would be your “desert island book”?

Cover of War and PeaceAh, that’s a hard one. I’m tempted to echo the very astute Helen Macdonald and cover all bases by opting for The Complete Works of Shakespeare. But I do think I’d miss the texture and immersion of fiction. So, I’m going to take War and Peace, because it has the broadest emotional scope of anything I’ve ever read, and because its great length means I’m less likely to be driven mad by repetition before I’m rescued.

Share a surprising fact about yourself

Most of my bio notes point out that I trained as a violinist, but I don’t usually mention my brief but thrilling tenure as a trombonist in my school jazz band. I really miss the trombone – what an instrument it is! Such swagger and sensitivity! I often daydream about taking it up again.

More Quick questions with WORD Christchurch guests.

Te reo Māori on the go – Te Wiki o te Reo Māori – Rātū

Ata Marie tātou, kei te pēhea koutou? Ngā mihi ki a koutou.

Kei a koe te tikanga – (it is up to you) – kia kaha kōrero ki te Māori

I have  recently joined the ‘smart phone’ club and will never again say to  tōku taitamariki /rangatahi (teenager) to get her face out of her phone! In fact I am the one who now gets – “are you on your phone again!”

Tōku waea pūkoro (phone) has been an extension of my te Reo Māori learning. Tūmeke!
I can now titiro, whakarongo me kōrero te reo Māori while waiting at te tākutu, waiting for te taitamariki/rangatahi (which is often), when TV is hōhā, when I am having a kai and sitting under he rakau feeling te rā on tōku kanohi.

I have found useful pages on Facebook that give me instant new learning in a very visual way.  My ‘photo’ app is now full of great kupu, rerenga, kiwaha me whakataukī. Like this one, that I can now copy, paste and/or share, print and stick on the fridge at home, in the office, in the car …

And for a short sharp bit of akoranga me pikitia (learning with pictures) :

Save the photo, use the kupu me Kōrero te reo Māori.

Check out some more technology and social media reo.

Kōrerorero mai, tell us how you do it – Kōrero Māori.

 Kia maia, kia manawanui – perserverance is well rewarded

 

 

Pae pāpāho pāpori – Social media & technology in te reo Māori

I love the Māori Dictionary. Here’s some social media and technology words in te reo Māori. Use them in Te wiki o te reo Māori, and all year round:Whāngaihia-te-Reo-logo

Thanks to Jaye Riki – @jayeriki on Pae Tīhau –  I know now the Māori word for selfie – ahau-i.

Here’s a great – and appropriate – sentence (with the 2015 tohumarau – hashtag):

E hiahia ana Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori kia muia ngā pae pāpāho pāpori e te tīhau, me te karere reo Māori mō Te Wiki o te Reo Māori mā te whakamahi i te tohumarau #WikiReoMāori
The Māori Language Commission wishes social media to be swamped with Māori language tweets and messages for Māori Language Week using the hashtag #WikiReoMāori