Quick Questions with Victor Rodger – WORD Christchurch

CoverWe are asking quick questions of writers and thinkers coming to the WORD Christchurch Festival 2018 (Wednesday 29 August to Sunday 2 September).

Victor Rodger is an award-winning playwright of Samoan and Scottish descent, best known for his play, Black Faggot. Last year his short story, ‘Like Shinderella’, was published in the Maori/Pasefika anthology Black Marks on the White Page.

Victor Rodger. Image supplied.
Victor Rodger. Image supplied.

What are you looking forward to doing in Christchurch?

Going to Vanilla Ices if it’s open!

What do you think about libraries?

They always contain treasure.

What would be your desert island book?

A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole or The Road by Cormac McCarthy.

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Share a surprising fact about yourself.

I bunked off school to go meet Lauren Bacall when I was a young fella at Linwood North.

Victor Rodger’s sessions at WORD Christchurch Festival 2018

Comfortable in your skin Friday 31 August 6pm

Black Marks on the White Page: A Roundtable Saturday 1 September 10.30am

The Sex and Death Salon Saturday 1 September 10pm

Shifting Points of View : Fail Safe / Fail Better

One thing Fail Safe Fail Better did not do was fail to deliver. Six speakers gave candid, entertaining and unique accounts of both personal and professional failures in their lives.

Clementine Ford, Victor Rodger, and Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel at WORD Christchurch, Friday 1 September 2017

Not at all negative, the evening was filled with magic. Glenn Colquhoun invoked ghosts of poets past on the walls of the Christchurch Art Centre’s Great Hall and filled the empty space with poetry (Denis Glover’s The Magpies) and song: his own composition of the ill lucked couple in the poem calling to each other.

While Glenn suggested that sometimes words can fail, he didn’t fail at his task; reciting his performance from memory. I thought you were in great voice, Glenn, as was Witi Ihimaera, who as well as getting the audience to sing in rounds (we failed!) and telling us an alternative fairytale (The Ugly Princess) told us all that his incredible success was all somehow a glorious accident…

Witi’s new book, Sleeps Standing / Moetu, is by no means a failure. Written in bilingual form with Hemi Kelly, it is an outstanding account of the Battle of Orakau, during the New Zealand Land Wars. Witi does however claim to have failed along the way; the Trowenna Sea was not a huge success.

Victor Rodger regaled us with the fact that failure is in the eye of the beholder. Or is it that you can’t please everyone all the time? A hugely successful playwright (2017 Writer in Residence Victoria University, 2012 Pacific Artist in Residence at the MacMillan Brown Centre for Pacific Studies, 2009 Ursula Bethell Creative Writing Resident, Canterbury University), Victor’s use of another well-known F-Word in his work fails to impress the one person he wants to be proud of him – his Mother.

The nature of failure follows a pattern; as we say, when one door closes, another opens. Each lost opportunity leads to another, or a different path in life. A higher lesson in there, perhaps, on freedom and predestination.

This was an idea shared by Christchurch Mayor, Lianne Dalziel. Sometimes the timing just isn’t right; the universe has other plans. Our first shot at life and love may be an opportunity to reflect and refine. For her this manifested in a burn-out at Parliament after an exhausting inquiry into the Health Sector, which led to her standing down from Parliament. This left her in a good position to carry Christchurch through its transformation and rebirth.

These experiences are not without wounds. We’ve all been hit by failure, but it’s the resilience we gain that makes us stronger, says Hana O’Regan, Kai Tahu. It’s all in the way you look at it?

A champion of Te Reo, Hana turns life lessons into “rivers of words” writing her way through the experience to the learning on the other side. Each experience brings a lesson, says Hana; they turn up to say, we’ve been through this before, and we can get through it again.

Lastly, and certainly not least, Clementine Ford. Clementine shared a story of mislead youth and heartbreak. This lead us to two realisations: one: life isn’t a John Hughes movie (Pretty in Pink,The Breakfast Club), two: success is not marrying a wanker. Lol.

Fight Like A Girl author Clementine demonstrated her greatest weapon, her wit, in abundance; the lesson in her story being to hold your head high and laugh in the face of crushing (public) rejection.

Glenn Colquhoun, Witi Ihimaera (and Clementine Ford chasing offspring) WORD Christchurch Fail Safe Fail Better, Friday 1 September 2017

Some of the stories shared here were so candid that I chose not to share them. Those gems were for our ears only.

My failures? Well, I started the evening keeping to the theme. On a rainy spring night, I failed to find a car park close to the venue (ah the fun of driving around the CBD in circles) and didn’t make the venue on time. Miraculously the event started late. And the rest? Well thats Witi, Glenn and I…

Find out more

Can books change the world? – WORD Christchurch

Among the first few events at this year’s epic WORD Christchurch Writers and Readers Festival was “CAN BOOKS CHANGE THE WORLD?” This serious question arouses all manner of responses: Books ARE powerful! They HAVE changed the world! We cry. With fists in the air!

However, this intimate evening explored what drives writers to write in the first place – an important question – given that what we write can ripple out across earth. So, to traverse the topic of world-changing written thought, we were treated to a panel of clever literary people – children’s and short story writer Kate De Goldi, journalist and playwright Victor Rodger, and academic, writer and literary critic John Freeman – all of whom have won various awards and accolades.

The featured writers were probed with questions about “why they write”.  John Freeman began by stating that you have to keep yourself in check :

If you start thinking you can change the world, then you will have a rough time”. You’ll prime yourself for disappointment.

Therefore, you “write in the hope that people will be able to identity with you”. Hopefully, you can tap into something that touches them by seeking to appreciate their worldview.

BUT, he went on to warn “there is no such thing as apolitical writing”, you either have to take a position on certain issues, or you take positions by default. There is no middle ground.

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John Freeman. Image supplied.

Kate De Goldi seemed to concur with these sentiments, stating that New Zealand citizens tend to have a problem “speaking truth to power” and taking provocative (and sometimes) unpopular positions and entering into heated discourse! She emphasized that writing is about “being a responsible citizen”, and that “if people dont read there is no democracy”. Therefore, we need to back ourselves.

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Kat De Goldi. Image supplied.

Victor added to the discussion by revealing his own impressions of life growing up as part of a minority group – as a young Samoan New Zealander, most Kiwi books, plays and shows did not embody his point of view as a young man wrestling with his identity. So, “he really wanted to get his own impressions of life out there”, “to challenge cultural and racial stereotypes”. Which is critical, as his work has added important dimensions to New Zealand’s artistic scene and prompted Kiwis think about who we are as a society.

Victor Rodger. Image supplied.
Victor Rodger. Image supplied.

It was an edifying evening, I found myself taking in this good advice from those who have hacked their way through the literary jungle. Its good to be reminded that with the privilege of free literary thought comes responsibility. And sometimes, we wind up writing something world changing!

WORD Christchurch

Feel like a change of career?

Victor Rodger’s first published play

Then why not become a scriptwriter for a show like Shortland Street?

Victor Rodger did just that and had his young adult audience and one lone age-challenged library assistant convinced that this was not only possible but something we should get onto straight away.

I’ve never watched Shortland Street – but I grew up on its big sister Coro Street which Victor admits to loving as well. Here’s what he said we’d need to do to get a position as a scriptwriter on this iconic New Zealand TV show:

  • Love your life and be prepared to share it – the good, the bad and the ugly (muted murmuring at that)
  • It’s OK to have failed Maths every year at school (much cheering here) but you do need to have an ear for dialogue and a love of English (back to murmuring)
  • Submit an application with a complete script attached (Oh No!)
  • While you’re waiting for the big bucks to come flowing in, go on your OE and get a job licking stamps or working for three months for the French Embassy when you can’t speak a word of French (that’s more like it!)
  • Try not to ruffle any feathers in the industry – the New Zealand TV world is tiny and you can’t afford to make enemies. No swearing when things don’t go your way (Boooooo!)
  • Be prepared to work from anywhere in the world. (WooHoo!)

Victor RodgerVictor gave good, positive advice which can be summed up as:

Never Give Up!

Three giant Samoan students in front of me high-fived throughout. They so wanted his life. After the event I saw them gathered at the stage door waiting for him. I loved him for the glimpse of another life that he gave us. Then I trudged my weary posterior back to the hotel and blogged this for you. Scriptwriting might need to wait for another life!