Wā kōrero ki te kainga – Storytimes at home

Ko tēnei te wiki o te reo Māori (it’s Māori Language Week) and throughout our network of libraries the usual preschool storytime sessions for this week will have added te reo Māori content.

If you attended a session and want to try adding some te reo Māori stories at home, or if you missed out and want to give it a go yourself here’s a list of recommended titles for introducing some linguistic variety into your child’s storytime repertoire.

Cover of Te hua tuatahi a KuwiTe hua tuatahi a Kuwi  by Katherine Merewether

Kuwi the Kiwi has never had an egg before, so she’s unsure how to look after it. When the egg gets a crack Kuwi thinks that the egg is broken, but she’s in for a surprise.

Kanohi – My Face by Kitty Brown

One of a series of te reo board books. Read our interview with author Kitty Brown.

Cover of Rhyme & reoRhyme & Reo: Aeiou: A Fun Way to Learn Māori Vowel Sounds by Jessica Ngatai

“This book is an educational resource to help teachers, parents whanau and children build confidence to use and enjoy te reo. Illustrated and featuring quirky Kiwi poems, weaving reo through the English text, with explanatory notes on the pronunciation of the vowel sounds appearing on a side-bar on each page”

Cover of Māori art for kidsMāori Art for Kids by Julie Noanoa

This collection of 15 projects offers children aged 7 and over a range of unique Māori art experiences. Practical skills cover sculpture, photography, design, paint, mixed media, collage and more. Easy-to-follow instructions include illustrations of the steps involved, using everyday craft materials, recycled and found objects. Examples of taonga (treasures) created by leading contemporary artists are shown alongside each project with a brief explanation of the object, its purpose and use in the past and present.

Cover of Hoiho pakuHoiho paku by Stephanie Thatcher

“An endearing story about a penguin called Little Hoiho who wants to be more like the other birds she sees around her, Kotuku, Toroa, and Tui. But Little Hoiho learns that her body is made for swimming and spinning and twisting in the water, and that she is perfect just the way she is”

E oma, moko kākāriki by Gay Hay

A rare Wellington green gecko is wary of predators and runs to safety. Includes factual information about green geckos, their behaviour and life cycle, and traditional Māori beliefs about geckos.

Cover of Mahi tahiMahi tahi by Sharon Holt

A song (with book and CD) about working, playing and interacting together. Read our interview with author Sharon Holt.

E hoki Flash by Ruth Paul

Follows the adventures of mischievous dog Flash who escapes from home and gets up to all sorts of antics, chasing cats, sneaking into cars, rolling in rubbish.

Cover of Nā wai te waka i totohu?Nā wai te waka i totohu? by Pamela Allen

The reader is invited to guess who causes the boat to sink when five animal friends of varying sizes decide to go for a row.

Hairy Maclary no te teri a Tanarahana by Lynley Dodd

When Hairy Maclary and his canine friends go for a walk and encounter Scarface Claw, the toughest Tom in town, they run away

Cover of Te TanguruhauTe Tanguruhau by Julia Donaldson

The Māori language version of the children’s picture book, The Gruffalo. A clever mouse uses the threat of a terrifying creature to keep from being eaten by a fox, an owl, and a snake, only to have to outwit that creature as well.

Kei reira ngā weriweri by Maurice Sendak

When Max wears his wolf suit and makes mischief, he is sent to bed without his supper. But in his room a forest grows and Max sails to the land of the wild things where he becomes their king.

Cover of Taniwha, taniwhaTaniwha, Taniwha by Robyn Kahukiwa

An adventure with Supa Heroes, Maui and Hina

Kei te toro haere mātou by Katie Kool

Simple adventures of family life with Charlie the dog. From the series Beginning to read with Charlie.

Cover of Ko wai e huna anaKo wai e huna ana? by Satoru Ōnishi

“Simple sentences, counting, colours, recognising emotion, the names of animals, beginner-level te reo Māori for children and learners.”

He tuatara by Carolyn Collis

Reader for children in Māori. Looks at a tuatara. From the Early Te Reo Reading Book series.

Cover of Te anuhe tino hiakaiTe anuhe tino hiakai by Eric Carle

Follows the progress of a hungry little caterpillar as he eats his way through a varied and very large quantity of food until, full at last, he forms a cocoon around himself and goes to sleep. Good for learning different words for food.

Waiata

Cover of Mahi tahiMahi tahi by Sharon Holt

A song (with book and CD) about working, playing and interacting together. Read our interview with author Sharon Holt.

Songs for Bubbas 2 by Anika Moa

Catchy music for preschoolers with some te reo Māori.

Cover of Waiata maiWaiata mai sing along with Aunty Bea

Book with audio CD (Music by Aunty Bea & Rodger Cunningham)

Hush: A Kiwi Lullaby by Joy Cowley

The traditional lullaby ‘Hush Little Baby’, retold with a strong New Zealand flavour. A baby is promised a series of items including a woolly sheep, kowhai flowers and singing tui.

Celebrating Father’s Day

Father’s day makes us pause, remember and show love and appreciation for our dads.

Dad and Daughter
Dad and Daughter

Some of us resist the  overt commercialism of it, while others of us love to buy gifts; either way most of us find it impossible to ignore. So kids everywhere, young and old, make or buy cards and plan something special. (often with a tad of help from mums and teachers.)

Do we find it as easy to make a fuss of Dad, as we do Mum? Breakfast trays adorned with a posy in a vase may not cut it for him. Though a tray with the Sunday paper might. What do dads want from their children on Father’s Day?  A quick verbal survey of some dads I know, varying in age, came up with these answers:

  • a card with genuine expressions of why they like having me as their dad.
  • real time together on the day – something we choose to do together.
  • a day trip, somewhere we don’t often get to go.
  • a meal out together.
  • letting me show them photos of when I was a kid.
  • hugs and no hassling for the whole day.
  • the latest Lee Child and whiskey would be good
    an undisturbed sleep-in then bacon and eggs.

Not many surprises there. Dads here mostly want to hang out with their offspring and /or have some rest. Unlike the traditional German Father’s Day Hike when men hightail it into the woods, pulling a wagon laden with beer and wine. Quite a different emphasis! To be fair in Germany the day is also known simply as Men’s Day.

Father's Day Outing
Father’s Day Outing

Parenting is not something we’re taught in school. It’s a strange new land for all of us who take that journey and we can often need advice and especially encouragement. There is a wealth of resources for fathering right at the library. Not to mention BabyTimes and StoryTimes held weekly in our libraries.

Dads, however you choose to spend it have a very happy Father’s day! We wouldn’t be here without you.

Cover of Don't puke on your dadCover of Fathers who dare winCover of The night of the living dadCover of Beginning fatherhood

Bread and butter, marmalade and…

LogoAre you missing Storytimes and Babytimes at the library? As an earlier post pointed out, we will be doing our best to get back to the normal schedule as soon as each library opens to the public.  However, in the interim, as well as calling on the services of our fantastic Outreach Team, you can have a go at  improvising your own session at home.  With the help of our digital resources, it’s a cinch!

Any self-respecting session starts of course with a proper hello. It’s hard to beat the classic:

Bread and butter, marmalade and jam,
Let’s say hello as loudly (softly/quickly/slowly) as we can.

or

Tena koe – hello to one
Tena kourua – hello to two
Tena koutou – hello to all
Haere mai everyone
Welcome everyone

You can then move on to stories.  The TumbleBook Library is one of the library’s premium websites that you can access for free from home with your library card number and PIN.

The TumbleBook Library has a wealth of animated, talking picture books which you can read, or have read to you.

If you want to be super-organised, you can create a playlist or use one of the pre-selected ones (you find them by clicking on Tumble TV). There are a dozen or so of these, including ones on those perennial favourites, dinosaurs and monsters.

To change the pace, add some action rhymes. Alternate stories and rhymes, and voilà, your storytime session is complete.

Just don’t forget the goodbye rhyme!

Bread and butter, marmalade and jam,
Let’s say goodbye as loudly as we can.