Themis Files : Waking Gods by Sylvain Neuvel

Waking Gods is the much awaited sequel to Sleeping Giants, Sylvain Neuvel’s first novel of the Themis Files series.

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OMG. After reading The Massacre of Mankind, Stephen Baxter’s sequel to H.G Wells’ War of The Worlds, this is too good to be true!

Once again, London is visited by Aliens. A whacking great Robot, piloted by almost-human beings. Except for their legs. They bend backwards. And their DNA…

Is it here to attack or protect us?  Or is it dissatisfied with the election? While the reader ponders this question, twelve more appear in the world’s major cities.

In Sleeping Giants we are introduced to a giant female figure, scattered in parts all over the earth. A machine, full of deadly possibilites. Our intrepid hero Dr Rose Franklin’s mission is to retrieve it – her – Themis; assemble her and learn how she works.

The Themis Files are written as a series of reports. Characters are interviewed, recorded or write in their personal logs, while the reader observes and absorbs the information, much as an invading intelligence might.

Neuvel has created some great characters here. In the partnership of the pilots, Kara Resnik and Vincent Couture, he reverses the roles. Kara’s character is a tough cookie, army-trained, who hits first, and wisecracks later. Vincent, scared of heights, self-doubting, is her voice of reason.

Rose Franklin is the scientist who first discovers Themis, falling into a hole and discovering a giant hand, glowing with an unearthly green light. Then there is Eugene, his unnamed Benefactor, and the consultant “Mr Burns”. The leaders of this enterprise aren’t quite what they seem.

Waking Gods introduces a new character, Eva (named after another famous robot or two). But that’s all I’m giving away.

Imaginative, unique and very human, this sequel was worth waiting for. I can see room for more. You’ll laugh, cry and be on the edge of your seat waiting for the Robots to move…

More Robots

Humans need not apply

Cover of I robotI have been watching Humans – a TV programme where humanlike robots are commonplace, they do the menial jobs, don’t answer back and are pretty handy to have about, that is until some start to display human characteristics.  All very far -fetched – or is it?

Ever since Isaac Asimov wrote I, Robot in 1954 we have had a fascination with robots and their possible effect on the human race.  Can they liberate us, or take over the world?

How to survive a robot uprising : tips on defending yourself against the coming rebellion and Rad robots : a celebration of awesome automatons : the mad, bad and dangerous to know could be just the books if you are feeling a tad anxious and want to be prepared!

Science Fiction stories have had a uncany ability to predict the future. Test tube babies, virtual reality, genetically engineered food have all featured in SF only to become commonplace. The science in science fiction : 83 SF predictions that became scientific reality makes fascinating reading.

How to survive a robot uprising Cover of Rad robots Cover of The science in science fiction Cover of Machines of loving grace Cover of Robot futures

Here are some more titles that you might want to read to keep up with the constant new developments:

 

Science Fiction newsletter

Here are a few of the covers from our August Science Fiction newsletter:

Cover of The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes Cover of Earth Afire by Orson Scott Card Cover of Abadon's Gate by James S. A. Corey Cover of the Humans by Matt Haig Cover of The Humand Division by John Scalzi Cover of Neptune's Blood by Charles Stross

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Science fiction newsletter for June

Our June Science fiction newsletter included the following titles:

Cover of Farside by Ben Bova Cover of You by Austin Grossman Cover of Prophet of Bones - by Ted Kosmatka  Cover of The River of No Return by Bee Ridgway Cover of Shadow of Freedom by David Weber Cover of How to build an android: the true story of Philip K. Dick's robotic resurrection by David F. Dufty

Plus: Nebula award winners, an interview with Kim Stanley Robinson from the Sword and Laser book club and some more robotic titles. Subscribe now to get a copy of our bi-monthly email newsletter.