Podcast – Cultural and Linguistic Minorities in Disaster Risk Reduction

Speak Up Kōrerotia logoChristchurch City Libraries blog hosts a series of regular podcasts from specialist human rights radio show Speak up – Kōrerotia. This show is created by Sally Carlton.

In this episode Sally talks with Sharon O’Brien and Federico Federici of INTERACT (International Network on Crisis Translation) and J. C. Gaillard and Jay Marlowe (University of Auckland) on the issues, challenges and strategies around communicating important information to diverse communities during times of disaster. Talking points include –

  • Interpreting vs translating
  • Importance of translation and interpreting as means of inclusion – first language use and access to information as human rights
  • Risks to crisis translators / interpreters
  • Importance of disseminating info to everyone before, during and following disasters
  • Importance of building relationships before disasters occur
  • Canterbury earthquakes
  • Vulnerability and strength of minorities – what they can bring to disaster prep
  • Importance of allowing minorities to formulate their own policies – not just “participate” in outsider-produced policy

Transcript – Cultural and Linguistic Minorities in Disaster Risk Reduction

Cover of Best Practice Guidelines Engaging With Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Communities in Times of Disaster : Final Report Cover of Preparing for Emergencies  Cover of Community disaster recovery and resiliency Cover of The New Zealand guide: Prepare for Disasters : How to Prepare for A Disaster + What to Do When It Happens  Cover of The Social Roots of Risk Producing Disasters, Promoting Resilience Cover of Building Resilience Social Capital in Post-disaster Recovery Cover of Library as safe haven

Find out more in our collection

More about Speak up – Kōrerotia

The show is also available on the following platforms:

World Refugee Day – 20 June

World Refugee Day is 20th June.

Cover of Krystyna's story“Most of the world’s refugees – 86 per cent — live in the developing world, compared to 70 per cent 10 years ago. Most of these countries have kept their doors open to people in search of safety, and have shown a generosity that is often well beyond their means. I appeal to all Member States and our partners in civil society to do their utmost to support the nations and communities that have welcomed the forcibly displaced into their midst..”

Ban Ki-moon

Refugee resources in our catalogue

Search for history of refugees in our e-resources

Red Cross Refugee Services Helping empower people from refugee backgrounds to achieve their goals and contribute to their new home in Aotearoa, New Zealand.

Christchurch Resettlement Services exists to support people from refugee and migrant backrounds living in Christchurch to settle successfully in New Zealand by providing a range of professional services that build on strengths to promote wellbeing and resilience.

Family Services refugee and migrant networks provides links to groups around New Zealand.

Te ranga tahi, together we grow

Today is Race Relations Day and the theme this year could not be more apt for Christchurch in 2014:

I am Aotearoa New Zealand…te ranga tahi, together we grow.

Race Relations Day 2014 PosterOur city, as we all know, is undergoing many changes post-earthquakes. For me one of the most exciting ones has been the influx of people from all over the world who have come to help in the rebuild. Together we are growing a new Christchurch, a city of not only new buildings but also and especially of new relationships.

The library reflects this harmonious coming together of cultures: we have growing collections of resources for new settlers, including books and magazines in a number of world languages. And our staff is similarly multicultural and multilingual.

So what better way to celebrate this Race Relations Day than to share this year’s theme in some of the languages that we collectively speak?

  • Te ranga tahi
  • Together we grow
  • いっしょに成長しよう
  • Juntos crecemos
  • Fakalataha auloa a tautolu
  • Ensemble, nous grandissons
  • 我们一起成长
  • Zusammen wachsen wir
  • एक साथ हम आगे बढ़ें
  • Magkasama tayong uusbong at yayabong
  • Ons groei tesame
  • با هم رشد می کنیم
  • Insieme cresciamo
  • A tatou fa’atasi e tupu
  • 우리 함께 가요
  • Samen groeien we

Can you guess what all the languages we speak are? Please comment with “together we grow” in your language if it isn’t included in the list.

Happy Race Relations Day!

Race Relations Day: People in harmony

Today is Race Relations Day.Poster

This year Mother Nature has unfortunately put a stop to those events such as the Lantern Festival and Culture Galore which celebrate the wonderful diversity in our community. However now more than ever it’s important to remember the many cultures which call New Zealand home, and support each other.

If your neighbours or colleagues are new to Christchurch or have difficulty understanding English, you can help them get the information they need.

Here are some useful resources:

And for an inspiring look at the way in which Asian communities have been helping Christchurch in the recovery effort, Asia Downunder had a nice segment on its programme of 20 March, which you can watch at TVNZ Ondemand.

2010 Diversity Forum


Along with some of my colleagues I have been lucky enough to have been sent by Christchurch City Libraries to the 2010 New Zealand Diversity forum, which was held in Christchurch this year.  The forum is an annual activity of the New Zealand Diversity Action Programme which has three key objectives:  To recognise and celebrate cultural diversity, promote equality and foster harmonious relations.

The convention centre was filled with colour, vibrancy and a multitude of languages, and the Library was there with a booth highlighting some of the resources that we have

I enjoyed a session where we were treated to stories from women of Indian, Chinese, Dalmatian and Lebanese descent talking about what it was like for their families, and especially their mothers assimilating into a new country.  Their mothers were central to keeping the family cultural identity.  Often they had very little English, but they provided the family with familiar food, customs and language which kept their cultures and families connected.

A few book titles were mentioned and you can find them in our library:

Our webpages also have information for new migrants, or those wanting to find out more about their histories: