Podcast – Arms control in outer space

Speak Up Kōrerotia logoChristchurch City Libraries blog hosts a series of regular podcasts from specialist human rights radio show Speak up – Kōrerotia. This show is created by Sally Carlton.

Maria Pozza is a world expert in the topic of arms control and outer space, and shares her legal knowledge of this ‘out there’ human rights issue, speaking about issues such as tension between the laws of nation states and international treaties.

Part I: The importance of talking about arms control in outer space
Part II: Outer Space Treaty
Part III: What do we mean by ‘arms control’ (weaponisation vs militarisation); New Zealand and arms control in outer space
Part IV: Future of arms control in outer space

Transcript – Arms control in outer space

Find out more in our collection

Cover of The history of human space flight Cover of The American way of bombing Cover of Space junk Cover of Throwing fire Cover of The Twilight of the bombs Cover of My journey at the nuclear brink

Streaming video

Access Video logoThe WPA Film Library: Nuclear Weapons Banned in Space, 1967 

U.S. Senator Robert Kennedy is present for the signing of a treaty banning nuclear weapons in outer space. (access with your library card & password / PIN)

 

Access Video: Space Junk Access Video - Space junk 

Horizon finds out about the threat from space junk and joins the scientists searching for ways to clean up the debris. (access with your library card & password / PIN)

 

 

Access Video: In orbit – How Satellites Rule Our WorldAccess video: In orbit

Dr. Maggie Aderin-Pocock traces the history of satellites from their origins through to today’s hugely complex spacecraft.

More about Speak up – Kōrerotia

The show is also available on the following platforms:

Remembering Hiroshima and Nagasaki – bombed 72 years ago

The atomic bomb named “Little Boy” was dropped by American airmen on the Japanese city of Hiroshima on 6 August 1945. Three days later on 9 August 1945, the atomic bomb “Fat Man” was dropped over Nagasaki.

The Hiroshima explosion destroyed 90 percent of the city and killed approximately 80,000 people; tens of thousands more died later from radiation exposure. The Nagasaki A-bomb killed approximately 40,000 people.

UNESCO’s call today resonates:

Never forget the victims. Never forget History.

Hiroshima and Nagasaki plaque by the Avon River. 4 August 2017.

Hiroshima - Small child with baby on back searching for anything of usefulness. New Zealand. Department of Internal Affairs. War History Branch :Photographs relating to World War 1914-1918, World War 1939-1945, occupation of Japan, Korean War, and Malayan Emergency. Ref: J-0012-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23130201

Hiroshima – Small child with baby on back searching for anything of usefulness. New Zealand. Department of Internal Affairs. War History Branch :Photographs relating to World War 1914-1918, World War 1939-1945, occupation of Japan, Korean War, and Malayan Emergency. Ref: J-0012-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23130201

Find out more about Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Cover of Yoko's diary Cover of Last train to Hiroshima Cover of Barefoot Gen Cover of Hiroshima Cover of First into Nagasaki Cover of Nagasaki

Find out more about the World Peace Bell in the Christchurch Botanic Gardens and its connection to Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Flowers under the Peace Bell
Flowers under the Peace Bell, Flickr CCL-2014-02-22-22February2014 DSC_1215.JPG