The camel ride including two young travellers at the New Zealand International Exhibition 1906-1907: Picturing Canterbury

The camel ride including two young travellers at the New Zealand International Exhibition 1906-1907 [ca. 1906]. File Reference CCL PhotoCD 12, IMG0005.
The three adult camels which offered rides to vistors to the New Zealand International Exhibition (1906-1907) were purchased in Melbourne, Australia. Prior to their departure to New Zealand, the camels gave birth. Accompanied by two baby camels, the three adult camels arrived in Christchurch in October 1906 onboard the S.S. Wimmera. After being unloaded they were conveyed to their destination by cattle trucks which were impractical given their long necks.

Featured as part of the “Wonderland” amusement park section of the exhibition, it cost 3d to ride a camel. The camel handlers were Aboriginal Australians from South Australia. The use of animals at the exhibition was inspected by representatives of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, but it was found that the camels were not being mistreated.

The exhibition closed in April 1907, after which some of the “Wonderland” amusements were dismantled and removed to Wellington where they were put on display at Miramar. Although one of the camels died in June 1907, the rest were relocated to Wellington. Following the Miramar “Wonderland” show, one of the camels was given to the zoo in Wellington.

Do you have any photographs of the New Zealand International Exhibition (1906-1907)? If so, feel free to contribute to our collection.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

The Camel Ride Including Two Young Travellers At The New Zealand International Exhibition 1906-1907

Nurses’ Home, Christchurch: Picturing Canterbury

Nurses’ Home, Christchurch, c.1950s. Kete Christchurch. PH14-266d. Entry in the 2014 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt. CC-BY-NA-SA-3.0 NZ.

From Beautiful Christchurch – a set of postcards containing 8 colour images and 8 black & white, published by Tanner Couch Ltd. This was the second nurses home, built duirng the 1930s.

Date: 1950s.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Do you have any further information about this photo? If so, please share it with us by leaving a comment.

110 years ago: The 1906 New Zealand International Exhibition

Today, when you stand at the intersection of Kilmore Street and Park Terrace and look westward across the Avon River you are greeted with the expanse of North Hagley Park. Designated as an arena for special events, the grounds usually remain empty save for the occasional cyclist or runner who might pass by. The only disruption to this tranquil scene is the traffic of Park Terrace.

Yet if you were to have stood in the same location over a hundred years ago, you would have been met by a very different sight. Set before the length of Park Terrace you would have found a gleaming white building styled in the manner of the French Renaissance with towers topped by golden cupolas. From across the river there would have drifted a mixture of noise; music, children shouting, camels growling and even the sounds of an American Civil War battle.

This was the 1906 New Zealand International Exhibition.

An artist's impression of the New Zealand International Exhibition 1906-07
An artist’s impression of the New Zealand International Exhibition 1906-07, File Reference CCL PhotoCD 8, IMG0093

Opening on 1 November 1906, the exhibition was an opportunity for the Liberal Government, led by Premier Richard Seddon, to proclaim to the world the technological and social achievements that had been developed in New Zealand. By the time the exhibition closed on 15 April 1907 up to two million people had visited, almost twice the population of the entire country.

Welcome to the Exhibition

In a city devoid of high rise buildings, the towers of the exhibition could be seen from across Christchurch, drawing people to its main gate at the end of Kilmore Street. After paying for a ticket and passing beneath a sign which proclaimed “Haere Mai”, visitors would cross a bridge spanning the Avon River. There they would find themselves standing amid carefully planned lawn gardens where they would decide whether to venture into the impressive building before them, or, perhaps if they were accompanied by children, to proceed to the various forms of entertainment that were to be found in the surrounding grounds.

If the grand Italianate façade proved too alluring, then visitors could ascend the front steps to discover what lay within. There, in the foyer, they could ride an electric elevator to the balcony of the southern tower where they were presented with a view of the city. Proceeding through to the Grand Hall, with its domed ceiling set at a height of 90 feet, visitors would enter the main exhibition hall. Here they would find the multitude of exhibits to which the building was dedicated.

The world in Hagley Park

In the machinery hall they could find examples of industrial progress ranging from motor vehicles to ice making machines. The Railway Department exhibit even housed a locomotive engine which had recently been built at the workshops in Addington. In the Department of Tourists and Health Resorts Court, visitors could explore a recreated Rotorua complete with a working geyser, a hot pool and children who would dive for pennies.

Rotorua at the New Zealand International Exhibition 1906/7, Hagley Park, Christchurch [1906?]
Rotorua at the New Zealand International Exhibition 1906/7, Hagley Park, Christchurch
[1906?] File Reference CCL PhotoCD 4, IMG0037
The courts dedicated to other imperial colonies allowed visitors to look upon minerals from Canada or purchase table grapes from Australia. In the Art Gallery they could view an extensive collection of British art or find the inspiration to participate in the Arts and Crafts movement. For those whose interest lay in native flora there was the fernery, a circular room with a green tinted glass ceiling where visitors could stroll amidst eighty different species of New Zealand ferns accompanied by waterfalls and pools of trout.

At the concert hall visitors could listen to performances by an orchestra under the direction of conductor Alfred Francis Hill, while moving pictures, a new form of entertainment, could be viewed in the neighbouring Castle Theatre.

Wonderland on Victoria Lake

Despite the exhibition’s emphasis on trade, industry and social development, the draw card for many visitors was not the exhibits but the amusements that were to be found in the grounds outside the main building. Scattered around the southern and eastern shores of Lake Victoria was a range of side shows and rides collectively called Wonderland.

Victoria Lake and “Wonderland” by night
Victoria Lake and “Wonderland” by night , New Zealand International Exhibition Souvenir, [1906]
The rides included the water chute, a toboggan course, a train designed to look like a dragon, the helter-skelter, a merry-go-round and a gondola which travelled on a pulley rope system. Entering The Pike, visitors were treated to a variety of amusements from penny in the slot machines, the House of Trouble maze, the Rocky Road to Dublin, the Laughing Gallery, to Professor Renno and his Palace of Illusions.

If the visitors were prepared to brave the smell which emanated from a fenced off section of Lake Victoria then there was the opportunity to see seals and penguins which had been imported from Macquarie Island.

Intriguing buildings and structures

One of the largest freestanding buildings constructed for the exhibition, and perhaps the most intriguing, was the Cyclorama. Circular in shape, it featured a 360 degree panoramic painting of the Battle of Gettysburg. Patrons would stand on a display, designed to look like a Civil War battlefield, set in the middle of the room, where they would listen to lectures on the history of the battle, accompanied by visual and sound effects.

Another structure of note was the replica pā, Te Āraiteuru, at the north-western end of Lake Victoria. Surrounded by a palisade, the pā consisted of a wharenui named Ōhinemutu, twenty whare puni, a set of pātaka and a tohunga’s whare. The idea was to convey to visitors a romantic recreation of a ‘lost’ Māori past. Performers were encouraged to wear ‘authentic’ Māori clothing and to cook their food over open fires. In addition to Māori, there were also performers from Fiji (who put on a display of fire walking), Cook Island Māori, and Niueans.

The Maori residents of Te Araiteuru Pa, [1906]
New Zealand International Exhibition 1906-1907 : the Maori residents of Te Araiteuru Pa, with Mr G McGregor of Maxwelltown, Wanganui [1906] File Reference CCL PhotoCD 12, IMG0008
For all their grandeur the buildings were never intended for permanent use. Their deconstruction commenced following the closure of the exhibition in April 1907. Throughout the year the site of the former exhibition still continued to attract visitors as much of the building material retrieved was either sold as firewood or auctioned for reuse. In another instance, crowds gathered to watch as the towers from which they had once looked out over their city were brought crashing to the ground.

One of the few buildings left intact was a prefabricated two storey workers’ cottage, designed by Samuel Hurst Seager and Cecil Wood to showcase the improvements in living and working conditions for workers that had been made by the Department of Labour. Since it was ready for inhabitation, the cottage was relocated and today it now stands at 52 Longfellow Street.

Elements of Te Āraiteuru also managed to survive. The meeting house is now on display at the Linden Museum in Stuttgart, Germany, while the carvings, after spending years in storage at Canterbury Museum, were eventually returned to their region of origin, Taranaki. The waharoa or carved gateway now resides at Te Papa Tongarewa.

Wonderland
Wonderland, showing the Water Chute, the Toboggan Slide, the Katzenjammer Castle and the Helter Skelter, Canterbury Times 7 Nov. 1906

Although nothing now remains of the former exhibition, the next time you find yourself standing on the shores of Victoria Lake, pause for a moment to imagine the sights you may have encountered had you stood in the same location on a summer’s afternoon in 1906.

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Photo Hunt October: Daffodils in Hagley Park, 1944

Daffodils in Hagley Park
Entry in the Christchurch City Libraries 2009 Photo Hunt. Kete Christchurch-HW08-D-009-Daffodils in Hagley Park. CC-BY-NC-SA-3.0 NZ

Kevin and his mum amongst the daffodils in Hagley Park in Spring 1944.

See more images of daffodils from Kete Christchurch.

Christchurch City Libraries has been running an annual Photo Hunt in conjunction with the city’s Heritage Week since 2008.  The 2016 Photo Hunt is running again from 1 – 31 October. During the month of October we will be posting a series of images from earlier Photo Hunts.

Enter the 2016 hunt online or at your local library.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch & Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Hagley Park and the Christchurch Botanic Gardens

Woodland bridge in Christchurch Botanic Gardens : on the right is the Bandsmens Memorial rotunda. [196-?] File Reference CCL PhotoCD 16, IMG0071
Woodland bridge in Christchurch Botanic Gardens : on the right is the Bandsmens Memorial rotunda. [196-?] File Reference CCL PhotoCD 16, IMG0071
If you like trees then Hagley Park probably rates as one of your favourite “Go-To” places, just as it is mine. With 164 hectares to wonder around in, and 5000 trees in Hagley Park and the Botanic Gardens there is always something new to see and enjoy, regardless of the weather, and it’s never crowded despite the 1 million plus annual visitors. On a sunny afternoon it can be very restful just to sit and watch the people go past ….

One of the best sights in Canterbury is when the blossom trees on Harper Avenue burst into flower – roll on Spring! The daffodils! Then there’s the Heritage Rose Garden (which I finally found near the hospital) as well as the main rose garden which is a joy to nose and eye alike.  And don’t forget the conservatories – they’ve been repaired and re-opened for a while now, so if you haven’t ventured into Cuningham House (or the other four Houses) post-quake, then it really is time to take a wonder through.

Cuningham House
Cuningham House, Christchurch Botanic Gardens. Sunday 27 July 2014. File Reference: 2014-07-27-IMG_0811

With KidsFest and the school holidays upon us, the Botanic Gardens are running a Planet Gnome promotion – the Botanic Gardens Visitor Centre will give you a passport and all you need to know to join in.

Botanic D’Lights on 3-7 August for the second year running – I didn’t go last year, and kicked myself for it, because it sounded amazing, and so much fun.  The event listing describes it as:

this five-night winter spectacle engages NZ’s leading lighting artists, designers and creative thinkers. When darkness falls, you’ll explore an illuminated pathway which turns the Gardens’ vast collection of plants and grand conservatories into a glittering winter wonderland. All to the beat of exciting soundscapes and special performances.

Botanic dlight
The peacock fountain during Botanic D’lights 2015

So looking forward to it! Note to self: bring hat, coat, gloves, torch and cash for hot drinks and food as well as the gold coin donation for the Children’s Garden renewal project. See you there!

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Looking at the Botanic Gardens

Looking at Hagley Park

Resources

Skating In North Hagley Park : Picturing Canterbury

ph14-294a_medium
The photograph was taken and developed by my father Harry Baldwin, with a Graflex camera with a glass plate film holder. Date: Probably 1940s.
Entry in the 2014 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt by Bruce Baldwin.  Kete Christchurch. CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 NZ 

Winters were colder in the 1940s.

Kete Christchurch is a permanent digital archive that aims to provide a forum for Christchurch and Banks Peninsula residents to share images, stories etc. Anyone can join and contribute.

The Amazing New Zealand International Exhibition 1906

The dragon, New Zealand International Exhibition 1906/7, Hagley Park, Christchurch , File Reference CCL PhotoCD 4, IMG0034

Brainchild of Premier Richard Seddon, the New Zealand International Exhibition of Arts and Industries opened in Hagley Park on 1 November 1906. There are heaps of resources on our website about the exhibition, which was designed to showcase New Zealand’s distinctiveness.

For an overview of the ins and outs of the exhibition our online guide is a must. You can find out about the incredible buildings that housed this extensive exhibition, the many display courts – the Tourism Court included a replica and not entirely politically correct Rotorua, and the different entertainments and exhibits, including the strictly non-educational Wonderland.

A view of Wonderland
A view of Wonderland and the rest of the New Zealand International Exhibition 1906-1907 from the top of the waterchute [1906] CCL PhotoCD 12, IMG0003
People came from far and wide to see the exhibition. This lovely photo on Kete Christchurch shows two gentleman visitors who’d come all way the from Kumara in Westland.

New Zealand International Exhibition : southern half of the main avenue. File Reference CCL PhotoCD 4, IMG0013

Hagley Park must have been a sight to behold and we have plenty of photos in our digital images collection to pore over. I’m rather taken with the magnificent dragon pictured above and also this image of the southern half of the main avenue – I’m amazed at the size and detail that’s gone into this construction.

As well as images we’ve also digitised publications and other items about the exhibition. This Certificate of Attendance and exhibition souvenir are just a gorgeous mementos of a fabulous day out.

Certificate of attendance
Certificate of attendance, Mr. and Mrs. Parker of Wellington, 11th April 1907 CCL Archive 818

In terms of reading material The Official Record of the New Zealand International Exhibition of Arts and Industries is nothing if not exhaustive. I haven’t had time to look through it all, but I thoroughly enjoyed looking at the list of awards and prize competitions. There were awards and medals for absolutely everything – some representative samples of West Coast alluvial gold won gold and a James Petrie of Timaru also won gold for his burglar-proof self-locking sash and frame window.

All these resources are a fascinating glimpse into life in New Zealand just over 100 years ago. I wish I could have been a fly on the wall.

More resources

Rough Riders – Image of the Week

Review of the New Zealand Rough Riders (3rd New Zealand contingent). 15 Feb. 1900.

Review of the New Zealand Rough Riders (3rd New Zealand contingent)

In 1900 the Government accepted an offer by the Mayor of Christchurch, William Reece (1856-1930), and prominent businessman George Stead (1841-1908) to organise a third contingent of New Zealand Mounted Rifles to be sent to the Boer War. The organising committee raised the funds, selected the troops and set up a training camp in Addington. Most of those enlisting were competent horsemen and marksmen. Shown here is a review of the troops in Hagley Park in front of His Excellency the Governor, Lord Ranfurly (1856-1933)

Do you have photos of Christchurch? We love donations. Contact us

Also contact us if you have any further information on any of the images. Want to see more? You can browse our collection here.

Image of the week

Children sailing model yachts on Victoria Lake, Hagley Park. Circa 1960.

Children sailing model yachts on Victoria Lake, Hagley Park

Like what you see? Contact us.

If you have any further information on any of the images, or if you would like to donate images to our collection please contact us. Want to see more? You can browse our collection here.

Image of the Week

From now on an “Image of the week” from Christchurch City Libraries’ image collection will be a regular feature on our blog. In keeping with New Zealand Music Month we present this musically themed photograph from 1906.

Erecting the electro-pneumatic organ in the Concert Hall for the New Zealand International Exhibition in Hagley Park, Christchurch [1906]

Erecting the electro-pneumatic organ in the Concert Hall for the New Zealand International Exhibition in Hagley Park, Christchurch [1906]

For more information on and images of the exhibition see our New Zealand International Exhibition 1906 pages.