Hits and misses with MyHeritage

I do dabble in family history research as I am fascinated by the names and stories that make up me. I am not alone as family history as a hobby is increasingly popular. There are dead ends, misleading entries and then – Bingo! –  a lead and you are off on the chase again.

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Due to the popularity of family history research, big business has gotten involved and now most family history library edition eResources such as Ancestry and Find My Past are available in libraries only. This ensures the popularity of individual subscriptions for those who like to seek out new family branches from the comfort of home.

db-My-Heritage-CKEY879406There is though one exception to this rule and that is MyHeritage which is the only genealogical eResource libraries offer that can be accessed from home. By using MyHeritage you can see:

Census of England and Wales (1841-1901) and the USA federal census (1790-1940) with images;

1.5 billion exclusive family tree profiles;

Millions of cemetery headstones and historical photographs;

Government, land and court records including citizenship and naturalization records;

Wills and probate records.

I had a quick play recently and found myself rather taken aback on two levels. Firstly some of the family tree profiles were incorrect which annoyed the hell out of me – family trees can be submitted by any MyHeritage members. Secondly I found myself looking at pictures of my Great Grandfather and my Great Great Grandfather which I had never seen before. Family history research is full of hits and misses and MyHeritage is no exception. If you have yet to explore this new tool then please do. It may just provide the lead you need to progress your search.

An electronic marriage – Origins and Find My Past

Christchurch has a large array of electronic, print and people resources for those wishing to discover their family history whether it be a lost branch of a family tree, a birthplace or a story. The family history electronic resources are very popular for those just starting out on their search or for those looking for that one random link that can make everything fall into place.

Due to this any changes to those resources can see a flurry of questions so please be aware that Origins has disappeared! Origins specialised in unusual and often hard to find British and Irish records. Its many early records include rare marriage indexes, apprentices and poor law records. All this information is not lost, it has just been “consumed” by Find My Past. The merger will see all of the Origins information including the National Wills Index combined with the Find My Past material into a mega family history resource under the Find My Past banner.

So one search and more results – just another way your life is getting easier (online anyway).

Older man at PC

Have a play and find the black sheep in your family today.

Stop Press: Find My Past releases more family history records

One million UK merchant navy seamen records have been released on Findmypast.co.uk. Thousands of these  seamen were recorded as being born in Australia and New Zealand. The records include biographical information such as name and date of birth, and in the most complete records eye and hair colour, address of kin, and a  photograph of the seamen.

They also contain vivid and unusual details such as scars and tattoos.

Find My Past: UK also contains among other resources:

  • The only 1841-1911 census collection online;
  • An online index of births, deaths and marriages (1837-2006);
  • Parish records for baptisms, marriages and burials dating from 1538;
  • Passenger lists for all long-haul voyages leaving the UK between 1890 and 1960.

This resource is also complemented by Find My Past: Ireland and Find My Past: Australia.These fantastic resources are  available at all our open community libraries, but not from home.  Come in and have a play and explore our other electronic family history resources from the Source!