Hamlet: The Video Game (The Stage Show): Q&A with Kathleen Burns

Shakespeare with tentacles, teenage sex, dead bodies galore, and nerf guns. Yup, you heard right. Hamlet: The Video Game (The Stage Show) is on now at The Court Theatre until June 24, and it is nothing like the Shakespeare you learnt at school.

Kathleen Burns is one of the cast, and we had a chance to ask her some questions about Hamlet, gaming, and this show.


Kathleen Burns

Shakespeare! Guns! Gaming! Kicking ass! Hamlet: The Video Game (The Stage Show) at The Court Theatre sounds awesome! Thanks for chatting to us about it – it sounds like a really interesting mix of everything.

Before we start, let’s play ‘Two truths, one lie’ to get to know you. What are two interesting facts about yourself? And what about one thing that’s not true? We’ll see if we can guess which one’s the lie.*

1: I am really good at saying the alphabet backwards super fast.

2: When I was a girl, I had webbed fingers and had to get them surgically un-webbed.

3: I can’t click my fingers.

That first one’s an impressive skill – I hope you’ve found some way to get that into one of your shows! Now that’s out the way, on to the important stuff. Old Will Shakespeare. We had to study one of his plays each year at high school. I think I just about died of boredom watching every girl in my class act out Romeo’s death in a Yr 11 English assessment – do you know just how long a 16-year-old can drag out a death scene?! It was painful!

What about you? Did you have to suffer through the plays in English class or did you actually enjoy learning about the Bard?

At first it was totally daunting… like… what are all these people on about…? But, I had good English teachers who broke it down. It’s actually super easy… this person wants to kill that person, this person wants to sleep with that person… Also I often got asked to read it out loud, and you know… any chance to be centre of attention haha!

What about now? Have your thoughts on him changed, or do you still feel the same way?

The older I get, the more I either love or hate it. Like… “Yay! Titus Andronicus is so cool! Let’s put people in pies!” or “OH EM GEE Hamlet is so annoying, I wish he would just make up his mind…”

So … Hamlet: The Video Game (The Stage Show). That’s quite a mouthful! I looked it up on The Court’s website, and the description for the show was:

“Rebooting the story of Hamlet as a video game, this show blends Shakespeare with modern gaming culture to create a uniquely entertaining live experience. You’ve never seen the Bard this bad-ass!”

What does that actually mean? Most people would say video games and 17th century plays don’t really go together. What exactly are we going to see when we go see Hamlet: The Video Game?

Are you kidding me? Shakespeare and video games are pretty much the same thing. Bloodthirsty violence, revenge, high body count, teenage sex… all of the fun stuff. In this show you can expect to see an epic nerf gun battle, an abundance of gaming jokes, and hearts torn out of chests both literally and figuratively.

So it’s not going to be an old guy standing alone on a dark stage talking to a skull in Ye Olde English that we’re not going to understand? Phew!

Hamlet: The Video Game (The Stage Show) got shown for the first time back in 2015. It obviously did well to come back for a second go, so who is the show *actually* for? Usually people who go and see plays are not the people who’ll spend time playing computer games, so where did the decision to merge classical theatre and gaming come from? And who’s the target audience?

The idea came about from Simon Peacock, who started as a court jester here in Christchurch but now works in the video game industry in Canada. He directed the voices on one of my favourite games: Assassins Creed! This show is totally for gamers. I mean yeah, Shakespeare lovers are loving it too… but it so so packed full of jokes for gamers.

In video games, the gamer is in charge of choosing what their avatar is going to do next, or where they’re going to go, and that happens in this show too, right? So it’s kind of like a choose-your-own-adventure version of Hamlet! That’s pretty cool.

Hahahaha no. It’s not a pick-a-path. Any experienced gamer will tell you that video games only offer the illusion of choice. At its heart, it’s the story of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. But with video game tropes over top, like, at the start, the audience get to customize their Hamlet character. So far the mohawk has been really popular. But can you please come along and choose the beret for once??? It looks kick ass and the audience hasn’t chosen that one yet!

Got it. Always choose the beret.

Back in the day, girls and women weren’t allowed to act in old Will’s plays – apparently boys and men did a better job of playing the female characters than actual females did. That’s pretty dumb, I reckon, but I guess that was just the way society was back then. There’s a real live female actor in this show though, right? Playing a real live female character? Does she get to do really cool stuff, or is she stuck at home doing embroidery and cooking and looking after the kids? Of course, if a female wants to stay in and do sewing, she totally can – you be you, girl, and do what makes you happy! Anyways – what are the girls up to in Hamlet?

Well actually it’s funny you mention that because…. I am totally a girl. Yip. Boobs and everything. And I’m a gamer too. (Pause for shocked silence) The most domestic thing any of the female characters get up to in this is when Gertrude in her bed chamber brushing her tentacles. Yip, that’s right, her mighty tentacles that come out of her head. When she’s not doing that, she’s kicking ass.

Shakespeare and the tentacles. Not a sentence I thought I’d be writing, but there it goes.

Lots of schools use Hamlet as one of their English texts. How close is this play to the actual Hamlet play? If I go see it will I be able to write about it in my NCEA exams?

It would actually totally help you to understand the basic story of Hamlet… I wish I had something like this when I was in high school!

All right, so you must have thought about this – if Hamlet actually got released as a video game, who would you choose to voice the characters? And why?

I will voice them all. With a million different hilarious voices. And maybe some voice changing technology to make my voice sound deep and evil for Claudius.

Right … you did say you wanted to be centre of attention at school. I guess some things don’t change.

How many of the folks involved in this show are actually gamers? And what’s the fave game at the moment? Although I bet they’re all pretty busy at the moment making sure this is  finished and ready for the audience.

All of us are either current gamers, or have been at some point in our lives. Personally, I’m looking forward to playing Andromeda because I’m a huge Mass Effect fan!

So… Hamlet: The Video Game (The Stage Show) is at The Court Theatre until June 24. It sounds like it’s going to be an amazing show to watch and should have something for everyone.

We’ve opened already! Only a week and a half left, so get in quick!

Thanks for chatting with us, Kathleen – have you got any last words for people out there trying to decide if this show’s for them?

It’s for you. If you come to the show, and then are like “maybe that wasn’t for me”, I will personally come into the foyer and admit to your face that I was wrong. (THIS HAS NEVER HAPPENED)


So there you have it, folks – Hamlet: The Video Game (The Stage Show) is for everyone. If you love Shakespeare but don’t game, or play video games but aren’t a fan of the Bard, or love Shakespeare AND gaming, go see it – it’s only $26, and it’s Shakespeare and tentacles. What’s not to love?!

* Oh, and in case you were wondering: the lie was … number 2.

Images supplied by the Court Theatre.

#Covfefe … or ‘President Trump and Shakespeare are more alike than you might think’

“This morning, I was completely covfefe’d. I arrived for a training session at one location, but didn’t realise the training had been moved to a different part of town. Oops!”

See what I did there? I used a word that didn’t exist 24 hours ago, and you probably understood what I meant by it. Donald Trump, the 45th President of the United States, has created a word, and now everyone is using it. Sure, we don’t *actually* have an exact meaning for that word at this precise moment in time, but Twitter, Urban Dictionary, and keyboard warriors world-wide are working on that, and I predict that ‘covfefe’ will be a word that we hear more of in the future.

CoverKnow who else created loads of new words that people had never heard of, but that we now use all the time in everyday conversation? William Shakespeare, a guy from 17th-century England who was (depending on your opinion) either the world’s greatest playwright, or the man we have to blame for making us suffer through never-ending plays where everyone wanders round in disguise, talks to ghosts, and takes an absolute age to die (Romeo Montague, I’m looking at you!).

Let’s face it, Shakespeare’s plays aren’t the easiest things to read – they have way more than 140 characters, there are some really weird words in there that we don’t use now, and the film adaptations your English teacher shows you are most probably ancient, with bad lighting and hideous makeup and special effects. … And people talking really… really… really slowly, so the whole thing sucks up hours of your life that you can’t get back.

CoverWhen it’s that hard to read his plays, you might be asking yourself a few questions: Why’s this guy so famous? Why do people think he’s such a great playwright (that’s the fancy name for an author who writes plays instead of books)? Who reads plays, anyway? and Why do I need to read this when it has nothing to do with real life in 2017?! I asked lots of those same questions myself, because studying Shakespeare every year of high school was about as fun as gouging my eyes out with a rusty spoon. (OK, fine, I haven’t actually tried that to see just how much fun it is, but I can imagine it probably isn’t too far off hearing the Bard’s words mangled by teenage girls and desperately trying to stay awake as the teacher made us analyse every. single. word. and discuss exactly why this actor had to exit on this side of the stage and not that side).

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But … SPOILER … Shakespeare was a really cool guy! He actually wanted his audiences to enjoy his plays, he invented loads of new words that we still use today, and his plays are like the soap operas of today – 1600s Shortland Street, if you will. He wrote some really cool stories about love, life, lust … and loss … and he wanted us, his audience, to have fun with his plays, and escape from their normal, everyday life. He wanted us to get caught up in the murders and passion and insanity so that we forget about the normal, boring, everyday things like homework, looking after your annoying family members, or the fact you’ve just broken up with the love of your life.

HE DIDN’T WANT US TO BE BORED SENSELESS!

So, how can we make Shakespeare more fun? Easy. Basically whatever type of book you like to read, there will be something to do with Shakespeare that it will be easier to read than the plays you’re doing at school.

Graphic novels are like watching a movie on a page. You can look at the pictures, which makes it so much easier to work out what’s actually going on.

CoverThere are pick-a-path versions of his plays where you put yourself in to the story, and choose what happens. Want to play Hamlet as a girl? Do it. Want to turn Romeo and Juliet into aliens and send them off to a distant planet? Do it. Want to cause a zombie invasion or apocalypse and just end the story early? Guess what, do it. Because you can. You can even follow the story the same way Shakespeare wrote it, if you want to.

Learn how to swear and insult people, or find out more about the gross, stinky, and ugly parts of Shakespearian life with some informative non-fiction.

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Prefer to read on your device? Not a problem. There’s a whole series of eBooks that at retell his plays in normal language so they actually make sense. And they’re written by authors who write normal books, so they’re heaps easier to read.

If you prefer reading fictional, made-up stories, there are heaps that have Will as a character, or are based around his life and plays. Some of these have more Shakespeare in them than others, but there could be something that you like the look of, so have a look at them and see what there is. I wouldn’t quote these in your NCEA exam, but you could still learn some interesting facts.

The last, and quite possibly best, way to get excited about Shakespeare – Hamlet: The Video Game (The Stage Show)! Christchurch’s own Court Theatre is putting on a show of William Shakespeare’s Hamlet as a video game, and it looks A. MA. ZING! We’ve been chatting to The Court Theatre about this show and it sounds like a must-see.

If you hate Shakespeare, go see it – it has action and guns! If you love Shakespeare, go see it – it’s Hamlet! If you need to take someone on a date, go see it – it’s the theatre, but it’s also a video game! Seriously, guys, this show sounds like it is going to have something for everyone.

Hamlet: The Video Game (The Stage Show) is on at The Court Theatre from June 3 to June 24, and tickets are only $24. I reckon that sounds like a bargain for this show. I can’t wait to see it!

Killing Jokes

The Court TheatreSome reasons to see The Ladykillers at the Court Theatre.

  • The cast. You’re in safe hands with these old hands. Actually they’re not old hands, they’re experienced hands. And experience counts. It’s unfair to single anyone out they are so uniformly good, but Rima Te Wiata as Mrs Wilberforce, “the wraith in a pinny” is outstanding. Especially her feet. They have a life of their own. You’ll have to see it to see what I mean.
  • The bits of business. Stepping on a scarf, straightening a picture, being hit on the head with a rotating blackboard – yes it’s slapstick but there is still a place in the theatre for slapstick done well. Surely.
  • The parrot. You never see him but you don’t need to. Imagining a diseased washing-up glove is better (or worse) than seeing one.
  • The script. Based on the Ealing classic film of 1955, the play is written by Graham Linehan, who wrote or co-wrote  Father Ted, Black Books and The IT crowd. No more needs to be said.
  • The set.  It’s a  masterpiece of ramshackle precision used to great effect by actors who never put a foot wrong. And it’s so very Christchurch.

A real treat in a cold winter.

More free tickets to Plum!

Photo of Colin McPhillamy as Plum
Colin McPhillamy as Plum

Congratulations to the lucky winners of the six double passes to ‘Plum’:

  • Jane Craker
  • Jennifer Leahy
  • Sally Cox
  • Kirsten Rayne
  • Colette Lim
  • Graeme Smart

Did you miss out? Fear not – there is another chance to win!

Today, at 1pm at Upper Riccarton Library, Colin McPhillamy (the actor who plays P.G. Wodehouse in ‘Plum’) will present an illustrated talk on Wodehouse and will read excerpts from his writing career. Colin will also talk about the play and there will be time for a Q&A session at the end.

Three spot prizes of double tickets to ‘Plum’ and an autographed show programme will be given away during the talk.

It promises to be a very interesting presentation and, who knows, you could be one of the lucky spot prize winners. Make sure you don’t miss out!

Win tickets to Plum!

Competition alert!
We have 6 double passes to Plum to give away, courtesy of The Court Theatre.

Plum runs from 9 to 30 August and deals with the wartime shenanigans of P. G. Wodehouse, the enormously popular author of the Jeeves and Blandings Castle novels and short stories.

For more background on Plum, read our blog posts.

Photo of Plum

To enter:

  1. Answer the following simple question: what was P.G. Wodehouse’s full name?
  2. Email your answer, name and contact details to competition@christchurchcitylibraries.com by 5 pm Sunday 17 August.

Conditions of Entry

  • Only one entry per person.
  • If you are a winner, you consent to your name being used for reasonable publicity purposes by Christchurch City Libraries.
  • Staff of Christchurch City Libraries and their immediate families are not eligible to enter.
  • The competition ends on Sunday 17 August at 5pm.
  • Winners will be drawn randomly and will be notified by telephone and/or email on Monday 18 August.
  • Prizes are in the forms of vouchers and don’t guarantee seats. You must book your seats at the Court Theatre’s Box Office.
  • Prizes are not transferable.

A Midwinter Christchurch’s Dream of Shakespeare 基督城冬季的莎士比亚之梦

Cover of ShakespeareWith 23 April 2014 marking the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare‘s birth, the Court Theatre is celebrating the Bard by bringing the midsummer heat into our Christchurch winter!

It is currently staging one of Shakespeare’s most imaginative and magical plays, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and, fittingly, it is presenting it in a unique conception.

Talented Chinese actors from Peking University’s Institute of World Theatre and the Court Theatre’s favourite Kiwi actors are performing together to interpret this masterpiece. The result promises to be a fascinating blend of their individual creative approaches.

Not being an expert on Shakespeare myself, I thought I’d translate and paraphrase part of a poem written by a brilliant Chinese poet (王佐良 1916-1995)33 years ago:

Shakespeare, with open mind and heart, absorbs one’s charisma,  莎士比亚, 你的心胸坦荡荡吸收这个的俊逸,

Imitates the other’s wildness, 模仿那个的开阔,

To write touching plays, 只要能写出动人的诗剧,

Lets emotions on stage fuel up flames, 让感情在舞台上燃成烈火,

More eternal than fire. 但又比火永恒.

The fate of many characters became the subject of deep thoughts: 多少人物的命运留下了长远思索的命题:

A young intellectual’s confusion, 一个青年知识分子的困惑,

An elderly father’s moaning in the wilderness, 一个老年父亲在荒野的悲啼,

A warrior husband’s love and paranoia, 一个武士丈夫的钟情和多疑,

Another warrior’s awakening at the edge of life, 另一个武士在生命边缘的醒悟,

Made many travellers stop by, 都曾使过往岁月的无数旅人停步,

Searching for the path of life again. 重新寻找人生的道路.

Do you agree with this assessment? Do you think it reflects Shakespeare’s work accurately? What changes do you envisage Chinese actors will bring to the feel of this special staging of A Midsummer Night’s Dream?

 Cover of A Midsummer Night's DreamP.S. Given the multicultural nature of this performance, I thought you might enjoy seeing the following translations of “William Shakespeare” and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” in different languages.

Chinese:   莎士比亚  –  仲夏夜之梦

Māori:   Rurutao   –  Te Wawata o te Pō Raumati

Korean:   윌리암 셰익스피어  –  한 여름 밤의 꿈

Japanese:   ウィリアム・シェイクスピア  –  夏の夜の夢

I particularly like the fact that Shakespeare translates in Māori as “to stab at one’s emotions” – if you do speak another language, do feel free to share with us how Shakespeare’s name and A Midsummer Night’s Dream have been translated in it.

Support the Court tonight with Ngaio Marsh – Crime Queen

CoverFans of classic crime fiction, of film and of the Court Theatre should all turn out for tonight’s fundraising screening of Ngaio Marsh – Crime Queen (Monday 26 September).

Hosted by Peter Elliott as Detective Inspector Roderick Alleyn, there will be a Q & A for 20 minutes with the film makers after the showing and a full compendium of Ngaio Marsh’s 32 detective stories and a signed copy of Joanne Drayton’s biography of Ngaio Marsh will be raffled on the night.

All funds raised will go to the Court Theatre’s fundraising appeal for “The Shed”.

This event is on at The Aurora Centre (corner of Greers Road and Memorial Avenue), at 7.30. tonight. Tickets are $25.00 and will be on sale at the door.

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