YA reviews: All the bright places, The catalyst and The originals

Want the skinny on books? Check out what the Cashmere High School Read and Review Team have to say.

Cover of All the bright placesAll the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

“Sometimes when we’re in the darkest places, we find the brightest light.”

Extremely moving, will make you feel joy, sadness and inspired all at once! All The Bright Places is an amazing book, it keeps you on your toes and is impossible to put down! I totally recommend it for teenagers!

– Genevieve (Y9)

Cover of The catalystThe Catalyst by Helena Coggan

It has been eighteen years since the world they knew was ripped apart around them, eighteen years since the ‘Veil’ between their world and the beyond shattered. Human were split into the magically Gifted and the non magic Ashkind.

Rose Elmsworth is fifteen year old Gifted working with her father at the Department, an organisation that holds power in the crumbling war-torn society. In Rose’s world monsters reside within men and women, and there is no one you can truly trust, not even yourself.

The Catalyst establishes a unique dystopian world that is the perfect setting for this dark fantasy story and leads perfectly into the second book in the series (The Reaction). It was an enjoyable read with interesting and intriguing characters.

I would rate The Catalyst 4 out of 5.

– Cassie

Cover of The originalsThe Originals by Cat Patrick

Elizabeth Best is a name, not a person. Elizabeth is the name used, and split, by 3 sister-clones: Lizzy, Ella and Betsy. Their mother is a scientist and cloned 3 “test subjects”. She intends to kill the two clones that aren’t ‘perfect’ but instead she gets too attached to the girls and runs away with them. She makes the girls live a third of a life until, one day, the girls have had enough.

I’ve read this book twice and the second time, even though I knew what was going to happen, I felt myself sitting there holding my breath! This book is amazing and you would be silly not to read it.

I rate it 4 out of 5.

– Eibhlin

Remembering the future

CoverMy way of escaping from our shaky city is to dive into a book and live someone else’s life.  Even if you’ve got no power you can curl up on the couch in a blanket and read about how other people cope with difficult situations, watch them fall in love, go on an adventure or solve a mystery.  One particular book I’ve read recently is about something that I’m sure we’d all love to do at the moment – forgetting the past.

Forgotten is an amazing new book by Cat Patrick, about a girl who can remember her future, but not her past.  Every morning at 4:33am, London Lane’s mind resets and her memories of the previous day are wiped.  London explains her condition:

I see the future in flashes, like memories.  I remember what I’ll wear tomorrow, and a car crash that won’t happen til this afternoon.  But yesterday has evaporated from my mind – just like the boy I love.

I’m sure it’s blowing your mind right now, trying to figure out how that would work.  I was slightly confused for the first couple of chapters, but then got drawn into the story and wanted to find out how she dealt with knowing the future.  Every night before she goes to sleep she has to write down what happened during the day so that she can remember it for tomorrow e.g. what clothes she wore, what homework she has to bring to school, and why her best friend isn’t talking to her.  There’s also the problem of remembering her boyfriend, because she can’t remember him from the previous day, but she doesn’t have any memories of him in her future either.

Forgotten is one of those books that keeps you thinking and wondering from start to finish.  Just like London, you’re trying to piece together bits of the past and the future to try and figure out how it’s going to end.  You may think that it sounds like science fiction but it’s not (I’d love to know how Cat came up with the idea though).  Cat Patrick’s writing is really unique and she’s created characters that teens will relate to.  I’m just glad that my mind doesn’t wipe clean every day so that I can remember this amazing book.