Poetry in Bloom

Poetica and Bloom Poetry CompetitionIf you’re a budding young poet, you might be in with a chance to see a piece of your work gracing a wall at Canterbury Museum.

To commemorate the fifth anniversary of the Canterbury earthquakes, Poetica is inviting children from Year 4 to Year 8 to enter a poem in the Bloom poetry competition.

Bloom is a collaboration between Poetica and The River of Flowers project, supported by Canterbury Museum. A mural will be designed that is inspired by and features the winning poem in an exhibition at Canterbury Museum. This temporary exhibition, accompanied by visual poetry and activities, will commemorate the Canterbury earthquakes through floral and poetry tributes by the people of Canterbury. The exhibition will open to the public
in February 2016.
Eligibility: Canterbury students from Year 4 to Year 8. Students who are immediate family members of Poetica, River of Flowers and Canterbury Museum staff, or judging panel members are not eligible.
Topic: Who or what gave you the strength to carry on after the earthquakes?
Example subjects: Your pet, your teacher, your grandmother, your best friend, your idol, a football, a song, a poem, a joke, your imagination, a smile, a hug, a walk on the beach, it could be anything or anyone. Surprise us!

The poem must be original and written by the student and must be no longer than eight lines or 40 words. The poem must be in the English language.

Send your poem to: info@poetica.co.nz
Please include your name, age, year and name of school.

The public will choose the winning poem from the shortlist by voting on the Poetica Facebook site. The poem that is ‘liked’ the most will be the winner and will be included in the Bloom exhibition at Canterbury Museum.

The winner will be announced on the Poetica Facebook page at 5.00 pm on 9 November* 2015, and the poem will be revealed on the wall at Canterbury Museum on 22 February 2016.
As the poem in Bloom will be temporary, Sound Sky gives the opportunity for the poem to be enjoyed for generations by recording the poem onto the Sound Sky app.

*The closing date of this competition has been updated.

Feeling reconnected with heritage

Logo of Reconnect Heritage EventsLast week I attended the Heritage Forum which was one of the events kicking off the Reconnect Heritage events weekend. There were a number of presentation that brought us up to date with heritage buildings and projects in Christchurch and Waimakariri.

Attendees found out about the progress of the digital earthquake archive Ceismic. This is a great source for anyone looking for first-hand earthquake stories, images and recollections in a variety of formats and from many sources, including Christchurch City Libraries. One (of many) collection of note is the digitised copies of The Press from September 2010 to February 2011 inclusive, plus 14 June 2011 and 22 February 2012.

It was great to hear how work is progressing on the Arts Centre. The project to restore the complex is going very well – keep up to date on their Tumblr page. I was fascinated to hear Brendan and Victoria’s presentation about the restoration of their heritage home in Lyttelton. They had just finished restoring their house when the first earthquake struck and following February and June had to go through the whole process again with additional bureaucracy.

View of ChristChurch CathedralChristchurch now has a unique opportunity to explore its archaeology and Underground Overground Archaeology are making the most of this. Fascinating tales revealed from clues left behind by Christchurch residents can be found on their blog – find out about hotels, life for children and the Canterbury Club, as well as many more. Quake City is Canterbury Museum‘s earthquake attraction, telling the story of the quakes through objects including the cross from the top of the cathedral spire and the Godley statue.

Next we heard about the status of some heritage buildings in the Waimakariri district. Focusing on Kaiapoi and Rangiora, we heard how many heritage buildings have been lost, such as Blackwells and the Rangiora Masonic Lodge, or are likely to go, such as Kaiapoi’s Bank of New Zealand. However, Waimakariri District Council’s Landmarks scheme is being developed to research and celebrate surviving and lost heritage buildings.

Lyttelton MuseumAfter their building was severely damaged in the February earthquake Lyttelton Museum had to salvage their entire collection, in collaboration with the Lyttelton Volunteer Fire Brigade and the Air Force Museum of NZ. This collection, and many others made homeless by the earthquakes, is now being taken care of at the Canterbury Cultural Collections Recovery Centre based at the Air Force Museum.

I had to leave before I could hear the presentation about post-quake Akaroa, but I really enjoyed hearing about what is being done to preserve the region’s built heritage, remember the earthquakes and uncover more about Christchurch’s past.

WOW Power

CoverCanterbury Museum is hosting some of the wowiest works from the World of Wearable Art. The show features some of the very best of their collection, touring for the first time in ten years, and it is amazing.

Books are all very well, and there are some very nice ones on the World of Wearable Art, but nothing can prepare you for the awe-inspiring reality of these works up close.

Get along to the Museum and be overwhelmed by the creativity, the workmanship and the sheer beauty of these costumes, immaculately curated and displayed. And it’s free, so you can go lots of times.

“Only the unknown frightens men…

But once a man has faced the unknown, that terror becomes the known.
Antoine de Saint-Exupery.

CoverI can’t wait to see The Heart of the Great Alone: Scott, Shackleton & Antarctic Photography at the Canterbury Museum (the library has copies of the book).

H. G. Ponting’s images record Scott’s Terra Nova expedition of 1910 – 1913 and F. Hurley’s icescapes were taken during Ernest Shackleton’s polar expedition on the Endurance in 1914-16. They were presented to King George V and today belong to the Royal Photograph Collection.

From 20 August 2010 to 20 February 2011 Canterbury Museum is the only venue for this exhibition outside the Queen’s galleries. Not bad, eh?

I’m amazed by how they managed to get such good photos in such weather conditions, it demonstrates that it’s not the equipment that matters but the photographer’s ability (remember to breathe in when you press the shutter!).

If you want to hear and see how Antarctic photography works nowadays, book your spot at the Canterbury Museum for New Zealand’s independent publishing mogul, photographer and conservationist Craig Potton‘s presentation on the 26th of August 2010.

Or perhaps you might prefer to listen to the Curator of the Royal Photograph Collection on the 24th of August 2010.

Who is your favourite great outdoors photographer?

I am very fond of Light and Landscape by Andris Apse, beautiful New Zealand. And it’s hard not to be moved by Ansel Adams‘ black and white masterpieces.