Zetland Arms hotel, Cashel Street, Christchurch: Picturing Canterbury

Zetland Arms hotel, Cashel Street, Christchurch [1902]. File Reference CCL PhotoCD 10, IMG0026.
Date: 1902

Another of the early wooden hotels in Christchurch which was originally an eating house, later a hotel. The licensee from 1898 was John Fox (1836-1907). This building was condemned by the Licensing Committee in 1902 and plans for a new hotel were approved in March 1902. See: Early Christchurch Hotels compiled by Jim Watson.

Source: Canterbury Times, 7 May 1902, p. 36.

Do you have any photographs of Canterbury hotels? If so, feel free to contribute to our collection.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

David Welch – Port to Plains; Over and Under the Port Hills, the Story of the Lyttelton Railway Tunnel

The Lyttelton rail tunnel officially opened on 9 December 1867. The trip through the hill secion took less than seven minutes. This was New Zealand’s first rail tunnel, and for many years it was also the country’s longest. The Lyttelton rail tunnel was the first in the world that was driven through the side of an extinct volcano.

I recently attended David Welch’s Heritage Week talk about his upcoming book: Port to Plains; Over and Under the Port Hills, the Story of the Lyttelton Railway Tunnel.

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Entrance to a tunnel on the Christchurch railway [ca. 1868] CCL PhotoCD 18, IMG0029
No dry reading here! David loves a good social history so has concentrated on the real characters in the saga of constructing a tunnel through a volcanic caldera. In his talk he brought to life well-known early pioneer names such as Fitzgerald, Moorhouse, and Dobson in snippets of stories included in the book.

I for one am really looking forward to its publication. Place a hold on Port to Plains; Over and Under the Port Hills, the Story of the Lyttelton Railway Tunnel and we will let you know when a copy arrives for you to read.

Find out more:

A 1920s bloke’s shed at 60 Aikmans Road, Merivale: Picturing Canterbury

A 1920s bloke’s shed at 60 Aikmans Road, Merivale. Kete Christchurch. Pearce_family_photos_45. Entry in the 2013 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.

A 1920s bloke’s shed at 60 Aikmans Road, Merivale. This shed held the prized family car, the motorbike, tools and was also used for the family business. Arthur James Pearce did his cobbler work in this shed. This shed was every 1920s mans dream, hence why it got its own photo! Taken by Arthur Cyril Pearce in about 1920.

Entry in the 2013 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt

Photo Hunt 2017: Plains, Port Hills & Peninsula – Finding our way

This year the theme for Photo Hunt is Plains, Port Hills & Peninsula – Finding our way. However, the photos you submit are not limited to this theme. We invite you to share any of your photos and help grow the city’s photographic archive. All entries must be received by 31 October.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

A Fatigue Party On Duty, Addington Camp, Christchurch: Picturing Canterbury

A Fatigue Party On Duty, Addington Camp, Christchurch. 1900. File reference Photo collection 22, IMG02212.

These men are shown carrying out their duties at a camp in Addington where recruits were trained before leaving for the South African (Boer) War (1899-1902). They are riding on a wagon owned by J.M. Heywood & Co. who were general cartage contractors of Christchurch and Lyttelton.

Do you have any photographs of Canterbury’s involvement in the South African War? If so, feel free to contribute to our collection.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Postcard Hilltop Hotel: Picturing Canterbury

Postcard Hilltop Hotel. Kete Christchurch. PH16-044. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.

Postcard of old Hilltop Hotel on Summit Road, Christchurch-Akaroa Highway.

Entry in the 2016 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt by Gladys Gurney.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Do you have any further photographs of the Hill Top Hotel? If so, feel free to contribute to our collection.

Cool stuff from the selectors: Fashion, architecture and insects

9780714873343On Eating Insects

In theory I like the idea of eating insects, it makes sense in a world where food could become scarce – it would seem that we are unlikely to run out of insects or plagues of locusts, but what about putting this into practice? “Bee Lave Taco or Moth Mousse” anyone?

On Eating Insects is not just about exotic sounding recipes, it gives us a holistic view of the subject with thought-provoking essays and fascinating stories of field trips into the world of the people who have eaten insects for centuries.  The political, cultural and ecological aspect of eating insects is also examined, creating a book that will leave you thinking, and perhaps looking at that ant nest in your garden in a slightly different light.

9780847858521The Art of Dressing: Ageless, timeless, original style

Style icon Tziporah Salamon profiles the chicest and most celebrated older women of today, while imparting practical tips on how to put together beautiful outfits

With headings such as “Good shoes and a good handbag are a must”, “Consider the whole effect: you are creating a work of art, a painting”, and “Enlist the services of a good seamstress and tailor” you would be forgiven for thinking that this book is not for the average middle-aged woman – and you would probably be right. However if you love to pore over books that include colour, style and a touch of whimsy then this is definitely the one for you.

As an aside, what is it with older women and hats?

9781614282273The big book of the Hamptons

Another book to peruse, salivate over, and wonder how some people have all the luck. I have been obsessed with the Hamptons and their general surrounds since I started reading fiction set in this location. The Hamptons are always depicted as full of beautiful but comfortable homes nestled near the beach, eccentric but lovable families, arty types, romantics….wealthy but not pushy.  This book does not disappoint.  It’s big and it’s full of photos.

There’s a reason why artists and writers, movie stars and moguls, musicians and composers, fashion designers and decorators, architects and craftsmen, fisherman and farmers have flocked to the Hamptons for all these years.  They are drawn by the glorious landscape, the extraordinary light, and the promise of pleasure.

9780714873497Mobitecture: Architecture on the move

The Camper Kart – a pop top in a shopping cart, the QTvan, a camper for mobilty scooters or the A47 mobile library – all the buildings in this book are designed to move.  Some are practical and actually work, some are purely experimental, and others are art installations.  There is sure to be plenty of inspiration for anyone interested in the idea of small houses, camping ideas or houses of the future.

Winter in Canterbury: Picturing Canterbury

A selection of winter themed photographs from Kete Christchurch

Gilberthorpe Cottage in Snow 1945 by CCL Photo Hunt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.
Winter in the Garden City, by photopix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.
Snow at New Brighton Whale Pool, 2011 by heath is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.
Snow in Early Akaroa by jan is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.
Antigua Boat Sheds in snow by CityScape is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.
Christchurch Railway Yards and Gas Works, July 1978, by Kevin Hill, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.
Three views of the big snow of 1918, by CCL Photo Hunt, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.
Snowfall on Riccarton Road 1976, by CCL Photo Hunt, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.
Fun in the Street [Melrose St, 1945 Christchurch Snowstorm], by CCL Photo Hunt, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.
Snow on North Beach, 6 June 2012, by Gina Hubert, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Do you have any photographs of winter in Christchurch and Canterbury that you would like to contribute to Kete Christchurch?

100 years ago today: Sign of the Kiwi opens

In June 1917, the new tea house at the summit of Dyer’s Pass was officially opened.

“The new house at Dyer’s Pass, now half an hour’s walk from the tram terminus, appears destined to be known just as the Rest House, although in some quarters it is called the Toll House. It is a tea house unique in New Zealand.” (Star, 9 June 1917)

The building, designed by Samuel Hurst Seager, was described in the Star as “An inviting flight of red stone steps leads to the entrance, an open porch, with big plate-glass windows at each end. Across the porch is a deep jarrah beam, bearing the quaint carved inscription:-”

Jog on, jog on, the footpath way,
And merrily hent the stile-a,
A merry heart goes all the day,
Your sad tires in a mile-a

The Sign Of The Kiwi   A Car And Excursionists In Front Of The Sign Of The Kiwi, Dyers Pass, Summit Road, Christchurch   Interior, Sign Of The Kiwi   Toll Gate And Lantern, Sign Of The Kiwi   Serenity & Shadow   Plinth Of The Sign Of The Kiwi, Dyers Pass, Port Hills, Christchurch

The Sign of the Kiwi, as it would later be known, was the third of four rest-houses that had been envisaged by Harry Ell as part of the Summit Road Scenic Reserve scheme. Unlike the other rest-houses, the Sign of the Kiwi, was planned to include a toll-house with the collected tolls going towards the construction of the remainder of the road. The Kiwi also provided tearooms, which Harry’s wife, Ada, took over managing in 1920. The collection of tolls and the management of the tearoom attracted some controversy and Harry would often write to the local papers letting his feelings be known about this subject.

In the 1940s the building was closed by the Department of Lands and Survey with responsibility for it being handed over to the Christchurch City Council after 1948. The building was then used as a custodian’s house and modified so that the only public access was to the porch. In 1989 the council began restoration of the Sign of the Kiwi to its original state and it was opened again as a refreshment and information centre.

The building was damaged in the 2011 Christchurch earthquake but after undergoing repairs it was reopened in January 2017.

Read more about the Sign of the Kiwi, Harry Ell and the Summit Road.

Follow our tweets from @100chch to discover life and events 100 years ago in Christchurch and Canterbury.

Harold Parsons, Horse and Cart: Picturing Canterbury

Harold Parsons, Horse and Cart, 1915. Kete Christchurch. PH14-AlTu-harold_parsons_-_horse_and_cart. Entry in the 2014 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt by Alan Turner. CC-BY-NA-SA-3.0 NZ.

Harold Parsons in suit with three children. Child on Harold’s knee is Basil Turner (later general manager of Turners Office Products, Colombo & Tuam St), others unknown.

Location: St Martins, Christchurch.

Date: circa 1915

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Do you have any further information about this photo? If so, please share it with us by leaving a comment.

7 May 1917: Canterbury Aviation Company makes first flights from Sockburn Aerodrome

Canterbury (NZ) Aviation Co. Ltd  was formed in August 1916, and purchased land for a flying field 3 months later. The Company was chaired by Sir Henry Wigram, who had tried to have a state-backed flying school established and when that attempt failed,  decided – along with his fellow directors – to establish their own. By the end of December that year, 40 pupils had enrolled to learn to fly.

C M Hill, Chief Instructor. Image from The First Hundred Pilots

The first flight was made by instructor Cecil M. Hill (pictured at left) on 7 May 1917, and by 1919, 182 pilots had been trained.

In 1923 the government decided to take over the company and run the airbase under a military umbrella: in June the base was officially handed over and renamed Wigram Aerodrome. Sir Henry Wigram continued his support: donating £2500 to the Government for the purchase of an aeroplane – a Gloster Glebe fighter – and gifted a further 81 acres of land in 1932.

Over the years the Wigram Aerodrome has been part of not just local, but national history as well:

Charles Kingsford-Smith (1897-1935) made the first Tasman flight from Sydney to Christchurch, arriving at Wigram Aerodrome on 10 September 1928. His aircraft is pictured on arrival. File Reference CCL PhotoCD 17, IMG0015
Neptune Lockheed aircraft at Wigram for Operation Deep Freeze 1961. Entry in the 2014 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt by Dave Howell. Source: Kete Christchurch, CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 NZ

The Museum opened on 1 April 1987, and the Base itself closed to commercial air traffic in March 2009. The final Wigram Air Show was held the previous month.

Learn more