Television


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Thorrington School Minecraft sessions

Tuesday 2 December, 10.45am – 12.30pm

This is education within the gaming world. Teaching and Learning in the medium of Minecraft. Students are learning what a community is and how to physically build one. They are discovering the essential workings within a community, for example decision making, voting on decisions and negotiating ideas, and are learning with and from other peer experts.

All you teachers out there this is a chance not to be missed. Be involved in this new opportunity. It’s free professional development to learn the intricacies of Minecraft and see why children are so enthused by it.

3D-Technology

Horizons From 2D to 3D

Wednesday 3 December, 1.00pm – 2.30pm

This programme is experimenting and creating in 3D design. Moving from the 2D world into 3D, students are learning the New Zealand curriculum technology design process of  idea > target market > purpose > specifics > production model > testing prototype > evaluation. Students are learning to create in 123D design software then 3D print their prototype.

Media

Film School with Canterbury Home Educators

Friday 5 December, 11.00am – 12.30pm

Film School discovers script writing, filming and software editing to create short movies and documentaries. Students narrate their own script and learn how to film using good lighting and set design. They collate images, footage and interviews into iMovie software, where they then edit keys, transitions and music and share their final short movie with Youtube and South learning Centre website.

Peter Jackson watch out!

Horizons Robotics with Science Alive

Friday 5 December, 1.00pm – 2.30pm

image              robotics_content

This is a joint venture with Science Alive with a focus on creating Lego robotic vehicles and learning how to programme them to manoeuvre. Add light and ultra sonic sensors to complete challenges. Be creative and add a pencil/paint brush to your vehicle for your own masterpiece!

In our Learning Centre, students experience e-learning programmes aligned with the New Zealand Curriculum document. These programmes provide learning in a technology-rich environment and the teaching within these programmes keep abreast with the latest teaching philosophies and strategies.

If you are interested in working with us to tailor an existing programme or work alongside us  please contact us Tel: 941 5140 or  Learningcentre@ccc.govt.nz

Cover of Remotely controlledMy father once said to me, “when you’re watching TV, you’re watching other people make money”. Fundamentally he’s right, and both my parents were right in making me turn off the idiot box and then kicking me out of the house to go and play outside or, if it was rainy, I’d have to find something creative to do like draw army pictures of death and explosions, or play an instrument. Initially there was a battle, as the injustice of it all provoked me into a frenzy of rage. However, over time I learnt to entertain myself in other ways and enjoy the outdoors along with my juvenile wee crew of renegades, terrorizing the neighbourhood on our after school excursions.

That’s why I enjoyed reading Dr Aric Sigman’s book Remotely Controlled, which discusses how “television is damaging our lives”. This book is a compelling read, and demonstrates via a range of scientific/psychological studies how prolonged TV viewing stunts the brains development in teenagers and pre-teens in particular, and seriously hinders their ability to reason and perform well academically. TV quite literally dulls kids down as it provides rewarding chemical and hormonal experiences without the brain actually having to do any creative thinking or reasoning, as opposed to reading a book for example, where the readers mind creates its own images and depictions of the settings and characters, exercising the mind and fostering creative thinking. Interestingly, there is a recommendation that kids under two should not have ANY screen time at all, while some in the field of child psychology and development are more extreme and recommend five as the age to introduce the idiot box.

Further to this, Aric Sigmund argues that TV is too stimulating, and addictive, with ongoing viewing causing impulsive behavior in people whose minds are used to the instant gratification it provides, which in turn develops an attention deficit in people. Then there are all the social problems TV arguably causes, or reinforces: consumerism, depression, material and social dissatisfaction, social anxiety, unreasonable expectations of life in general …you know, like when you started high school and thought it would be like Beverly Hills 90210 where Brandon or Dylan would come chat you up in their cool leather jackets with their quiffed hair dos, or that your social interactions would be like those depicted on Home and Away, where the good old Aussie, salt of the earth digger Alf Stewart would provide an ethical and moral compass for all those in the “the bay” and correct anyone acting out of line! It was a shock for me to learn life’s not like those romanticized and idealized dramas.

There are those who dispute the works of Dr Sigman and the methods he employs to convince us all of television’s detrimental impacts on society. But he’s entitled to his opinion. After all, Dr Sigman has the whole alphabet under his name, as he works in health and education lecturing at medical schools and to National Health Service doctors in the UK. He is a Chartered Biologist, Fellow of the Society of Biology, Chartered Psychologist, Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society, a Chartered Scientist and a fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine.

So there you go, have a read and decide for yourself, and when you are done, like me you can curl up on the couch with a blankie and watch Shortland Street, or Coro or Home and Away and forget about how mad the world really is with a bit of good old hellevision … whoops I mean television.

Logo of Naxos Video LibraryWhilst making myself aware of what library resources we have via the Source today I came upon ‘a gem’. Now I quite understand if you don’t think this tidbit of information is mind-blowing, because, let’s face it, we all appreciate different things.

If someone mentioned in passing that they had found a fantastic library resource all about the history of football which showed vintage games of yesteryear, you would probably find me in the foetal position banging my head on any available wall (not as easy as it sounds!).  But theatre productions – now, that’s a totally different ball game (every pun intended).

I clicked on Music, audio & video and chose the option Naxos Video Library. I then selected the option Genres and Programmes which showed me Theatre.  I would have had much more immediate fun if I hadn’t clicked on Opera, Monuments/History/Geography and Feature Films first, but maybe I had to wade my way through the potential of these first to truly experience the excitement I felt when – alphabetically by playwright’s surname – I found plays and theatre productions I had never heard of before. Some of these productions go back as far as 1960 with the most recent being a Shakespearean play put on at the Globe Theatre in 2011.

Cover of Much Ado About NothingAnyway, back to the 1960s and 70s…  Eli Wallach, Lee J. Cobb, Dustin Hoffman, Ingrid Bergman, William Hurt, Sissy Spacek, Jason Robards, Walter Matthau are just a few of the American actors who ‘trod the boards’ in their younger years before Hollywood beckoned. Some of the offerings are literally on stage sets, whilst others are televised versions of plays.

Chekov’s The Seagull , Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman, Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing are just a few of the more recognised plays, but there are also playwrights and plays I’ve never heard of before.

After much dithering I’ve decided to watch the 1979 production of Mourning Becomes Electra, Eugene O’Neill’s ‘classic American drama of love, revenge, murder and suicide’ with hopefully not a football in sight!

Have a look at the Naxos Music or Video Library next time you are on the library website – there’s a HUGE amount of material to cast your eye over.

 

Cinema Sex Sirens, Joan Rivers, Ja Rule and comedians are the stars of our September Popular Culture newsletter:

Book cover of Cinema Sex Sirens Book cover of Diary of a mad diva Book Cover of Unruly Book cover of We killed Book cover of Dirty Daddy Book cover of Seriously...I'm kidding

 

Subscribe to our newsletters and get our latest titles and best picks straight from your inbox.

For more topical reading ideas, check out our blog posts from the WORD Christchurch festival.

The Library holds many culturally important taonga that inform our identity as Cantabrians. This is not one of them, but it is the coolest thing I’ve seen in Store since an old edition of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz:

Dr Who and the Daleks omnibus

 

Doctor Who and the Daleks omnibus is a 1976 TV tie-in. It includes two novel-length stories and vital information on Dalek anatomy:

Dalek-Anatomy

The Fourth Doctor (Tom Baker) was the Doctor du jour when this was published, and he (and his scarf) feature prominently:

Tom Baker and Daleks

 

Levity aside, never forget that “beyond the beyond of beyond at the dark endless edge of eternal space, exists a life force that has neither form nor substance.”

Invasion

Look to the skies…

Dalek saying goodbye

Mid-July is here already, how much more winter can you get? I spent a whole day this past weekend where I never left the house. Well, I did go down the drive to get the paper, but that was hardly adventurous.

Book cover of Soup

I quite like spending a day slouching about, not achieving much, not expecting to achieve much, but  relaxing and unwinding and trying to cast aside the thoughts that try to surface on a Sunday, thoughts such as, “I can’t believe the weekend is gone so fast AGAIN.”

So what did I do? Slept in until 10, then threw some ingredients into the slow cooker to make pumpkin soup.  A notion to eat Bacon Butties while reading the paper was satisfied as we had the crucial ingredients of bacon, bread and even the butty bit.

A check in on Facebook, my shameful addiction, took longer than I thought it should, along with the usual email mass deletion along with my background habit of randomly finding tunes on YouTube to listen to as I do other things.

I downloaded some songs I wanted to keep on Freegal, and checked my library holds, which seem to be stubbornly taking a lifetime to arrive. Librarians suffer from the same curse as many of our customers. You put a heap of items on reserve and then you wait and wait, then they all arrive at once!

I did a bit of reading; I’m almost finished I Am Number Four by Pittacus Lore, which I suspect is not the author’s real name.Book Cover of I am Number Four

Lunch was pretty haphazard, then my husband and I settled in for a Breaking Bad fest. We are probably the only two people in the known world not to have seen this so far gripping series, and we have luckily avoided knowing what happens at the end of the sixth season.

I do enjoy looking out of the windows at the weather on a quiet weekend. If it is rainy and horrible, then I can feel cosy and grateful I have a warm house to settle into for the day. If it’s sunny and bright I look at the garden and try not to feel guilty for not being out sorting the garden.

The afternoon meandered on with not a lot of purpose. I made some scones in the afternoon, to keep our strength up, you understand, and for dinner we had some pumpkin soup.

And so the day was over… not much to show for it, but that’s OK with me, we felt relaxed and revived and ready for whatever the next week would throw at us…bring on next weekend.

3D craftsCheck our the Learning Centre holiday programme – starting after Easter. Digital storytelling, Lego animation, Minecraft craft in combination with the awesome MakerCrate crew – lots of fun and learning for kids.

Take a look at what the kids did in the January holidays.

Film School Competition
Film
Film School 1st Prize Winner

Film School 2nd Prize Winner

Trendy Trading Cards
Trendy

Digital Illustration
Digital Illustration Best Of

Laine 2

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