The prison camp, Hanmer Springs: Picturing Canterbury

The prison camp, Hanmer Springs (1904). File Reference CCL PhotoCD 9, IMG0004.

Between 1900 and 1901 reserve land was set aside in Hanmer Springs for planting exotic trees to supply the Christchurch market. Planting of radiata pine and Douglas fir began in 1902-1903 and prison labour was used 1903-1913. There were 25 prisoners here in 1904, most of whom had asked to serve their sentence at Hanmer. Conditions were the same as a city prison, the only difference being the men got an additional four marks a week remission for industry.

See The Press, 10 September 1904, p. 3; The Weekly Press, 24 March 1909, p. 67.

Do you have any photographs of Hanmer? If so, feel free to contribute to our collection.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

The wahine who welcomed the visitors to Tuahiwi, North Canterbury: Picturing Canterbury

The wahine who welcomed the visitors to Tuahiwi, Christchurch Star, 4 Aug. 1922, p. 6.
The wahine who welcomed the visitors to Tuahiwi, North Canterbury. File Reference CCL PhotoCD 9, IMG0080.

Date: 3 August 1922.

“This was a week-long hui attended by Wiremu Ratana (1873-1939) and was the largest gathering of the Waipounamu Maori that had been held for many years. Its chief purpose was to discuss their claims over land taken from them in the past. Grievances were referred to as “Te hapa o nuitireni”, meaning promises made to them had not been fulfilled. Carrying bunches of broom, the three women headed a procession of women who welcomed the visitors, the waiata being led by the woman in the middle.”

Source: Christchurch Star, 4 Aug. 1922, p. 6.

The Ngāi Tahu Land Claim finally concluded with the signing of the Deed of Settlement on 21 November 1997 at Takahanga Marae, Kaikōura. The Ngāi Tahu Claim Settlement Act was passed into law the following year on 29 September 1998.

Do you have any historical photographs of Christchurch and Canterbury? If so, feel free to contribute to our collection.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Zetland Arms hotel, Cashel Street, Christchurch: Picturing Canterbury

Zetland Arms hotel, Cashel Street, Christchurch [1902]. File Reference CCL PhotoCD 10, IMG0026.
Date: 1902

Another of the early wooden hotels in Christchurch which was originally an eating house, later a hotel. The licensee from 1898 was John Fox (1836-1907). This building was condemned by the Licensing Committee in 1902 and plans for a new hotel were approved in March 1902. See: Early Christchurch Hotels compiled by Jim Watson.

Source: Canterbury Times, 7 May 1902, p. 36.

Do you have any photographs of Canterbury hotels? If so, feel free to contribute to our collection.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

The Late Maka Makomako, A Ngāi Tahu Chief Of Tuahiwi, Kaiapoi: Picturing Canterbury

The Late Maka Makomako, A Ngāi Tahu Chief Of Tuahiwi, Kaiapoi. File Reference PhotoCD 9, IMG0077.

The late Maka Makomako, a Ngāi Tahu chief of Tuahiwi, Kaiapoi.

“Maka Makomako, who was over ninety years when he died, is believed to be the last of the twenty-six principal chiefs who sold the first block of the 400,000 acres in the South, in Otakou, now Otago. The deed executed between the natives dated 31st July 1844, in which they conveyed to Mr William Wakefield, agent for the New Zealand Company, the land in the districts known as Otakau, Taieri, and Mataura, estimated to comprise 150,000 acres for £1400, bears on it, among the signatures, the name of ‘Makomako’. In conjunction therewith are the names of Taiaroa, father of the late Hon H K Taiaroa, Tuhawiki [sic], Horomona, Pohio, and others. The sign manuals of the Maori owners of the soil were witnessed by John Jormyn Symonds, P M Frederick Tuckett, George Clark jun, Protector of Aborigines, and David Scott”

Source: The Weekly Press, 3 June 1908, p. 51.

Do you have any historical photographs of Christchurch and Canterbury? If so, feel free to contribute to our collection.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

A 1920s bloke’s shed at 60 Aikmans Road, Merivale: Picturing Canterbury

A 1920s bloke’s shed at 60 Aikmans Road, Merivale. Kete Christchurch. Pearce_family_photos_45. Entry in the 2013 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.

A 1920s bloke’s shed at 60 Aikmans Road, Merivale. This shed held the prized family car, the motorbike, tools and was also used for the family business. Arthur James Pearce did his cobbler work in this shed. This shed was every 1920s mans dream, hence why it got its own photo! Taken by Arthur Cyril Pearce in about 1920.

Entry in the 2013 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt

Photo Hunt 2017: Plains, Port Hills & Peninsula – Finding our way

This year the theme for Photo Hunt is Plains, Port Hills & Peninsula – Finding our way. However, the photos you submit are not limited to this theme. We invite you to share any of your photos and help grow the city’s photographic archive. All entries must be received by 31 October.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

From the Sign of the Takahe: Picturing Canterbury

From the Sign of the Takahe. Kete Christchurch. PH13-135. Entry in the 2013 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.

Taken from the Sign of the Takahe out a window across the Canterbury Plains to the Southern Alps.

Entry in the 2013 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt.

Photo Hunt 2017: Plains, Port Hills & Peninsula – Finding our way

This year the theme for Photo Hunt is Plains, Port Hills & Peninsula – Finding our way. However, the photos you submit are not limited to this theme. We invite you to share any of your photos and help grow the city’s photographic archive. All entries must be received by 31 October.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Waka, Okain’s Bay, 1977: Picturing Canterbury

Waka, Okain’s Bay, 1977. Kete Christchurch. Waka__Okain’s_Bay__1977_2966945214_o. Entry in the Christchurch City Libraries 2008 Photo Hunt. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand License.

“This is my 2nd photo of the waka on Waitangi Day, 1977. The launching coincided with the opening of the Museum. I’m not sure if this was taken prior to the official launching, or the way back. (I think it was the latter). See also File Reference: HWC08-SO-101.”

Date: 6 February 1977

File Reference: HWC08-SO102

Entry in the Christchurch City Libraries 2008 Photo Hunt.

Photo Hunt 2017: Plains, Port Hills & Peninsula – Finding our way

This year the theme for Photo Hunt is Plains, Port Hills & Peninsula – Finding our way. However, the photos you submit are not limited to this theme. We invite you to share any of your photos and help grow the city’s photographic archive. All entries must be received by 31 October.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

The interior of a clothing factory: Picturing Canterbury

The interior of a clothing factory [1909]. File Reference CCL PhotoCD 9, IMG0012.
The interior of a clothing factory. The people standing at the end of the middle tables are operating irons.

Date: 1909.

Do you have any photographs of factories in Canterbury? If so, feel free to contribute to our collection.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Kōrerorero mai – Join the conversation

A Fatigue Party On Duty, Addington Camp, Christchurch: Picturing Canterbury

A Fatigue Party On Duty, Addington Camp, Christchurch. 1900. File reference Photo collection 22, IMG02212.

These men are shown carrying out their duties at a camp in Addington where recruits were trained before leaving for the South African (Boer) War (1899-1902). They are riding on a wagon owned by J.M. Heywood & Co. who were general cartage contractors of Christchurch and Lyttelton.

Do you have any photographs of Canterbury’s involvement in the South African War? If so, feel free to contribute to our collection.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Sultan Mahomet (ca. 1836-1905): Picturing Canterbury

Sultan Mahomet (ca. 1836-1905). File Reference PhotoCD 18, IMG0048.

Mahomet was a Muslim from Asia and he was one of a very small group of Muslims then living in New Zealand. His death certificate states that he came from northern India. A hawker, he lived in Dunedin but, at about age 69, came to Christchurch in Dec. 1905. He stayed at Brightling’s Lane in the Avon Loop, the address of his son, Sali, or Icecream Charlie, probably intending to attend Sali’s wedding. He died of a stroke at Brightling’s Lane and is buried in Linwood Cemetery

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Do you have any photographs of the Mahomet family? If so, feel free to contribute to our collection.