Christmas inspiration from RBdigital

Need inspiration for your Christmas day? Have a look at RBdigital magazines with everything from table decoration, food, craft, music and more!

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A Fashionable Day at the Races – Leave your hat on

Christchurch Casino New Zealand Trotting Cup Day is at Addington Raceway this Tuesday 13 November. Cup Day is known for FASHUN too:

Fashionistas get their chance to shine during the glamorous Westfield Riccarton Style Stakes Fashion and The Hits Body Art competitions.

Here is some last minute Cup Day fashion inspo, with a focus on hats, fascinators, titfers, and millinery:

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Bill Cunningham – famed as a New York street fashion photographer as featured in doco Bill Cunningham New York – first found fame as a designer of ultra-arty and outlandish hats under the alias William J. His memoir Fashion Climbing: A New York Life has lots of juicy hat stuff.

And of course, if you are looking for a contemporary hat goddess, you can’t go past the much-missed Isabella Blow.

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LOVE this hat and veil combo worn by Adut Akech on the cover of British Vogue’s December issue (coming soon to RBDigital Magazines for your reading/viewing pleasure)

You don’t even have to visit a library to get ideas. We have eMagazines as well as magazines in print. RBDigital and PressReader feature a range of fashion eMagazines, online magazines and newspapers including Vogue Australia, Cosmopolitan, Marie Claire and more.

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And how some historical inspiration – this stylish trio rocked Addington in the 1930s.

Three friends at Addington races, late 1930s. Source: Entry in the 2013 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt by Pip Joyce. Discovery Wall CCL-PH13-259

More fashion

Important ‘Bird of the Year’ research

One thing New Zealand well does is birds.

We have great native birds, and some don’t even fly. If you listen to Radio New Zealand we have the bird call every morning.

And on right now is the Bird of Year competition, last year the Kea won. New Zealand Geographic called them “the mad geniuses of the bird world” because of the way way the experiment with things just fun. A group of Kea were filmed setting off stoat traps using sticks, just to make them go bang.

I do like the Kea but this year I think I am going to vote for the Royal Spoonbill (Kōtuku Ngutupapa) because it is kinda goofy looking and it has random feathers that look like a weird hairdo and it is New Zealand’s only cutlery themed bird. Another bird with a good barnet (hairdo) is the Rockhopper Penguin, he looks like the hipster penguin. My kids want to vote for the Kōkako. They actually want to vote for the South Island Kōkako but can’t because it is officially extinct but there are rumours that they are still alive in the depths of the bush. There is a $10,000 reward if you manage to photograph one which might be the reason they want to go tramping.

There are over 50 birds to choose from for the bird of the year and if you want to learn about a particular bird there are heaps of them featured in New Zealand Geographic. Find them all here in the New Zealand Geographic Archive.

More about native birds

World Animal Day – 4 October 2018

What did the Bison say when his son left for College?

“Bison.”

World Animal Day is on Thursday 4 October 2018. It is important to recognise our furry friends of the animal kingdom, and World Animal Day is all about raising awareness to improve animal welfare standards across the world. 

World Animal Day was a concept originating with German writer and publisher Heinrich Zimmermann. He coordinated the first World Animal Day event in Berlin on 24 March 1925, and held it in the Sport Palace (Berlin Sportpalast) where over 5,000 people attended. Aside: Incidentally, the Berlin Sportspalast later proved a popular venue for party rallies and speeches during the rise of the Third Reich. 

Four years later, in 1929, World Animal Day migrated to its current date of 4 October. Whilst involvement was initially limited to Germany, Switzerland, Czechoslovakia and Austria, Zimmermann lobbied hard to have World Animal Day recognised universally. In 1931 he achieved this goal when his proposal was unanimously accepted at a congress of the world’s animal protection organisations in Italy, and World Animal Day became recognised globally as it is today.  

What is the significance of 4 October? This is the day of Francis of Assisi, the patron Saint of ecology. Two days before my birthday too, just in case husband is reading this (lol) and wants a birthday gift idea

Endangered Species

Endangered species are those plants or animals considered to be at risk of extinction. Contributing factors include loss of habitat (e.g. through deforestation), hunting, poaching, disease and climate change. 

The critically endangered Gorilla (photo not of real thing). Bosca by Chris Meder Ellerslie International Flower Show 2010. Flickr CCL-CHCH-2010-03-09-DSC-02997.

At present, critically endangered species include: 

  • Black Rhinoceros – which is in fact grey, and has been poached to the point of near decimation. The black rhinoceros is sought after for its horn, which is used in traditional Chinese medicine and in the making of traditional dagger handles in Yemen. 
  • Both the Eastern and Western Gorilla – the largest of the apes. The decline of the Western Gorilla is attributable to loss of habitat through deforestation and the Ebola virus, which wiped out a third of their population between 1992-2007. Eastern Gorillas – situated in the Virunga Volcanoes region, the Democratic Republic of Congo and parts of Uganda – face the poaching of their young, and are often caught in the crossfire of armed conflict occurring in and around their habitat. 
  • The Northern Hairy-Nosed Wombat of Australia. One of the worlds rarest critters, these wombats declined due to drought and the introduction of livestock, decreasing their access to food. Recovery plans are in place, but the plight of the animal is grave. 
  • Red Wolf – The red wolf roams the USA, and is threatened by loss of habitat due to agriculture, and being hunted to near extinction.  

Sadly, this is merely the tip of the iceberg, and many of the world’s beautiful and exotic creatures are in imminent danger of slipping away forever. Just to think that in my lifetime we may bid adieu to the majestic tiger, is a terrible thought. And it’s not only animals who are heading for extinction, many of the earth’s plants, algae and fungi are also disappearing. 

You can find information on the status of any animal on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, and Arkive also has some in depth coverage on conservation issues and the endangered species of plants and animals. 

Quick Animal Facts

On a lighter note, here are some rather riveting animal facts in honour of World Animal Day:

  • An elephant creates around a tonne of poo every week. No more said. 
  • Caterpillars have 12 eyes. That’s four more than a spider. How creepy of them. 
  • Mosquitoes are attracted to feet that smell. Explains a lot. 

Explore more fun facts on National Geographic Kids

Animal eResources: Students & Adults

Find out all you need to know about animals and the natural world through Christchurch City Libraries’ impressive selection of eResources. Here are just a few, click on the links to find out all about your favourite animals 🙂 :

National Geographic Virtual Library & Britannica Library for Adults
Here you will find in-depth reference material, articles, photos and books on animals.

NZ Geo TV
NZ Geo TV contains documentaries on the natural world –  New Zealand and global.

Student Resources in Context
Focused reference material and images targeted at students.

Smithsonian Global Sound for Libraries
If you prefer your music to be of the natural variety, check out this eResource which has access to thousands of music tracks, both animal and human made. Like this birdsong.

Explore these and much, much more on our eResource A-Z page. All you need is your library card and PIN

Animal eResources: Kids & Teens

New Zealand Birds and Animals, Dogs & Frogs
Informative pages put together for our website, by our librarians.

Britannica Library for Kids & World Book Kids
Encyclopedia and reference material aimed at school aged kids.

National Geographic Kids
Archives from the popular kids magazine- all sorts of fun images, maps and articles on the natural world around us.

All of our other eResources for Kids can be found on our website.

Web Resources 

Books & Magazines

I would recommend Adventures of A Young Naturalist, the exploits of British broadcaster David Attenborough, and any of his groundbreaking and educational documentaries about the natural world which you can borrow for FREE at Christchurch City Libraries (in case you hadn’t heard, documentaries are now free at our libraries!). 

Some of our latest animal titles: 

You will also find animal mags online through our eMagazine resource RBdigital:

Browse for other books about animals through our catalogue.

Programming: Reading With Our Furry Friends

Jock the dog at Christchurch City Libraries. Flickr 2015-07-02-9429.

What kind of monster could resist that face? Reading to Dogs sessions are designed to provide a relaxed, non-threatening atmosphere in which children may practice their reading skills and develop a love of reading. Our dogs are the beloved pets of the Christchurch City Council Animal Management team, and have all been trained and tested for health, safety and temperament. Our dogs:

  • Can increase a child’s relaxation while reading
  • Listen attentively
  • Do not laugh, judge or criticise
  • Allow children to proceed at their own pace
  • Can be less intimidating than a child’s peers

Library staff and a dog handler will be present at all times to help facilitate the sessions. 

See our online calendar for dates and times

How Can You Help? NZ Organisations Helping Animals

Animal Shelters, Rescues and Adoption Agencies

Animal Rights Organisations

Zoos & Educational Facilities

As always, more information can be found in our community directory CINCH: Community Information Christchurch.

eMagazines – recent additions to RBDigital

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The 2018 FIFA World Cup is Here!

The biggest sporting event on the planet is here: the FIFA World Cup. The 31 best teams in the world and Australia will all be meeting in the heat of the Russian summer to try and claim their status as world champions. There will be scandal, drama, excitement, passion, and given that the tournament is being played in Russia, probably hooliganism. So let’s have a look an all too brief look at this event that unites the world, albeit for the briefest of moments..

 

The World Cup is an event fill with drama. Iconic images that define tournaments. Nations rising a falling with their teams. Think the image of David Luiz’s in tears following Brazil’s humiliating semi-final defeat to Germany in 2014. Andres Iniesta ripping his shirt off to reveal the message “Dani Jarque siempre con nosotros” (Dani Jarque always with us) in honour of his dead friend and former teammate as he scored Spain’s winning goal in 2010. Zinedine Zidane’s head meeting Materazzi’s chest as France’s hopes and dreams disappear into a moment of madness in 2006. Ronaldo Luís Nazário de Lima in 2002. Zidane for the right reasons in 1998. The list goes on, and everyone will have different memories and experiences of the World Cup; such is the beauty of this truly global event.

Let’s start with a fairy-tale from the land of fairies, Bjork, Arnaldur Indriðason’s particular brand of dark, atmospheric crime fiction, a land that has a population less than greater Christchurch, the smallest nation ever to be represented at the World Cup finals; I am of course talking about Iceland. This team that is greater than the sum of its parts won hearts and imaginations as it reached the Quarter Finals of the 2016 European Championship (and comically knocked England out of the tournament and produced the greatest piece of sports commentary of all time). Neutral observers will be watching in hope that they can repeat this feat in Russia, if for no other reason, so their amazing fans get stay at the tournament for as long as possible.

From fairy-tales to favourites: Germany and Brazil. The nations with the greatest footballing pedigrees. Germany, eight time finalists, four time winners; the most consistent team in World Cups. Brazil, seven time finalists, five time winners; the crown jewel of the footballing world. However, these two monoliths of international football contrast in their respective styles.

Brazil is emblematic of the world’s passion for football. Not always the best team, but almost always has some of the best players in the world; this team is no different with the likes of Neymar being present. Brazil are typified by their flair, individual talent, and their “samba” style of football. However, this present Brazilian team cannot be classified within that vintage of Brazilian football as it has a larger emphasis on organisation and discipline; expect midfield ball winner Casemiro to be pivotal to a Brazilian success.

Defending champions Germany are the world’s best team in terms of being a team. There are no obvious weak points in the starting 11, however, there are also no exceptionally standout players. With this said, expect Casemiro’s Real Madrid teammate in Toni Kroos to be controlling the flow of games from midfield with his vision and range of passing. What separates Germany out from the rest is the organisation and discipline, which is currently being set out by manager Joachim Löw, that lead Germany to success in 2014.
Given that Germany and Brazil are on opposite sides of the draw, I will not at all be surprised to see a Germany vs. Brazil final.

But we must not get too caught up in the fairy-tale and the favourites and remember this is a global event. Aotearoa New Zealand’s nearest neighbour, Australia, will be there attempting to draw on their efforts of 2006. Asian footballing giants in Japan and South Korea will be looking to impress upon the world the quality of football in Asia. Iran and Saudi Arabia will be representing the Middle East on the global stage. Egypt, Senegal, Morocco, Nigeria, and Tunisia will be trying to prove that Pelé‘s prediction of an African team becoming World Champions by the year 2000 wasn’t too far off.

Argentina will be looking for a redemption following falling at the last hurdle in 2014 as Lionel Messi seeks to cement his status as one of the greatest ever by holding the World Cup aloft. Peru will be wanting to rightfully reclaim their status as South America’s other top team after a 20 year hiatus from football’s main event. Uruguay will be looking for their first world cup after 68 years without. Colombia will look to develop themselves as one of South America’s top teams and become the 4th team from that continent to lift the trophy (The current three being Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay).

England will be look to lay to rest a thousand demons as they try to reclaim the glory of 1966. Spain will be looking to reclaim their crown as the world’s best team. France will be looking to end two decades of misery. Belgium, Croatia, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Switzerland, Serbia, and Ronaldo‘s Portugal off the back of their 2016 European success will be want to prove that they belong among Europe’s elite. Panama, Mexico, and Costa Rica will be out to show that they truly belong on the world stage. And Russia, oh Russia. Russia will be playing under the watchful eye of the world, the heavy gaze of a certain president whose eyes never seem very far away, and under the weight of expectation of a home crowd that will be expectant of some level of Russian success.

The four year wait is over for football fans, and the world’s only truly global sport’s grand exhibition is here as over 3 billion people worldwide will turn their attention to Russia and await for the drama to unfold.

FIFA World Cup coverage in New Zealand

Find football resources in our collection

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PS We have an eSports tournament on in July, and one of the games being played is a FIFA one.

eMagazines for your reading pleasure

Fresh eMagazines hot off the press from RBDigital Magazines. Perfect for a spot of relaxing reading – on your laptop, desktop, phone, tablet …

  1. Fashion Quarterly
  2. Q magazine
  3. British Vogue
  4. Vanity Fair UK
  5. Electronic Musician
  6. North and South
  7. Traces (formerly Inside History)
  8. New Zealand Listener

 

Philippine Independence Day, 12 June

Philippine independence day marks the anniversary of the nation’s independence from Spanish rule on June 12 1898. Changed from being on the 4th of July (independence was officially granted to the Philippines by the US on this date in 1946, plus the date was thought to fit in neatly with the States own independence day), this year marks the 54th anniversary of the Philippines ’12th of June’ independence day, and the 120th anniversary of its independence day generally. While we don’t have an option in NZ  to mark this as a public holiday, or to have a parade as impressive as the one that will take place in Manila, there are still some things you can do to commemorate this day. Here are our top five options:

Talk in Tagalog: If you can manage this you will be doing a lot better than me (even though I am half Filipino the only Tagalog words I’m familiar with are those associated with food, a sad indictment on my life incidentally). Happily the library has plenty of resources to help you manage this, including Mango languages, a fantastic language learning website (and app) available 24/7 on our website. Mango offers a course on Tagalog (as well as 60 other languages), and as Tagalog’s standardized form is one of the two official languages of the Philippines (the other is English) Mango could be a great starting point.
There are also some great books available in our libraries to help you learn some Filipino, for both youth and adult learners.

Read all about it: The Philippines has an extraordinary history spanning from pre 15th century barangays (settlements), to three hundred years as a Spanish colony, through American occupation, to its status as a Republic. It has a rich culture that is influenced by both East and West, its Spanish influence clearly evident in the archipelago’s sumptuous feasts, parades, and prevalent Catholicism, and its Chinese influence clearly seen in some of the counties favorite dishes (think rice cakes and noodles), and the supreme importance of family. Our libraries have some fantastic books available to help you learn more about the Philippines fascinating history and culture.

Cook Philippine style: A mere mention of pork adobe will make most Filipino weak at the knees (I would be one of the unashamed statistic aforementioned). Why not try your hand at one of the Philippines’ truly delicious dishes? The library has some cookbooks at hand to help you – some in Tagalog and some in English.

Karaoke: Karaoke has become one of those integral parts of Philippine culture, but if you’re not feeling up for singing there are plenty of pros around to listen to. Our libraries have some great Filipino CDs you can borrow which could inspire you to great karaoke success (or excuse you from performing, which in my case would be the same thing).

Phillipines book display at Central Library Peterborough

Borrow a Tagalog book: Did you know that we now have a Tagalog collection at Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre? And Central Library Peterborough is also hosting some books from the collection (photo above) this month to celebrate Philippine independence day. If neither of these libraries are close to you, never fear, there are Tagalog eBooks you can borrow from home through one of the libraries ebook platforms, Overdrive.
If you’re not feeling like a book today, there is also a great selection of Tagalog eMagazines and newspapers available through PressReader, one of Christchurch City Libraries’ eMagazine and newspaper platforms.

In a world of ‘fake news’, how do you know what’s real? Try eDS

If you’re for searching for information and want to be sure of meaningful and relevant results, try the eResources Discovery Search (eDS). From finding out if the earth is flat to information about vaccinations, eDS gives you a single entry point where you can search multiple Christchurch City Libraries eResources. Feel confident that you’re getting quality results as all sources are reliable vetted resources including peer reviewed articles. Other types of places that eDS will search includes:

  • Encyclopaedias
  • eBooks/eAudiobooks
  • Magazines and Journals
  • Newspapers
  • Primary sources
  • Educational videos
  • Photographs
  • Kete (our community repository)

Cavell Leitch New Zealand International Jazz and Blues Festival 2018

Frosty mornings, the threat of snow, and midwinter blues might be a couple of months away yet, but Christchurch is about to be hit by a different type of blues when the Cavell Leitch New Zealand International Jazz & Blues Festival comes to town later this week (May 23-27).

Returning to the city for its twenty-third year, this festival is a treat for lovers of jazz and blues, and offers a range of experiences showcasing local and international talent, and up-and-coming stars to watch out for in the future. Here are a couple that really stand out to me.

Kurt Elling, Grammy Award-winner and 8-times winner of the Jazz Journalists Association’s ‘Male Singer of the Year’ title, is headlining the festival, playing with the Kurt Elling Quintet at the Piano on Saturday, May 26. His is a voice that is an absolute pleasure to listen to, and with the backing of a live quintet, this is sure to be a magical evening.

Listen to Kurt Elling’s music in our collection (includes streaming music as well as CDs)

Whenever I think of jazz and blues, Billie Holiday is one of the first names I think of. Although we won’t be graced by the great singer herself, we will be able to experience the power of her repertoire when Mary Coughlan sings Billie Holiday in two concerts at The Piano on Wednesday 23 May. This show was first performed in Christchurch at the Jazz & Blues Festival fifteen years ago, and I’m hoping I get to it this time around – I was trying to decide whether to go see it back then, and didn’t, and have been kicking myself ever since.

Listen to Mary Coughlan’s music in our collection. 
Listen to Billie Holiday’s music in our collection (includes streaming music as well as CDs)

Having played clarinet when I was younger, I have always enjoyed hearing what Kiwi Nathan Haines has been up to in the music world, and am excited to see him here in Christchurch with Jonathan Crayford. With violin accompaniment, this duo will be reinterpreting the works of well-known classical composers to fit the jazz and blues style of the festival. Both Haines and Crayford have won the Best Jazz Album of the Year award here in New Zealand, and with this amount of skill on the stage I am really excited to see what they create.

Listen to music by Nathan Haines in our collection.
Listen to music by Jonathan Crayford in our collection. 

Of course, all the big names need to start somewhere, and the Jazz & Blues Festival supports these young up-and-comers and Christchurch locals. Georgie Clifford and Alice Tanner are two such ‘noteable young women’, and Christchurch local Kate Taylor, front-woman of the All-Girl Big Band, is also one to watch. On the festival’s last day, five Christchurch high schools will show off their jazz skills in the Festival High School Jazz Band Concert at Christchurch Boys High School on Sunday 27 May.

For something a little different, join chef Richard Till and local band The Eastern for an evening of Southern Fried Chicken and music at the Lyttelton Arts Factory on Friday 25 May and Saturday 26 May.

As you see, with so many different artists on the programme, there really will be something for everyone. I recommend getting your tickets now so that you don’t miss out on this wonderful musical experience. And, once the festival’s over, check out our jazz and blues resources to stay in the swing of things.

Jazz and blues in our collection

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Jazz and blues eResources

Naxos Music Library Jazz streams over 9000 jazz albums, from jazz legends to contemporary jazz. It covers a wide range of jazz music with recordings from over 32,000 artists. Labels include Blue Note, Warner Jazz, EMI, Enja, Fantasy and more. New albums are added weekly.

Jazz Music Library includes material from Concord Records, including New Zealand pianist Alan Broadbent, major jazz figures such as Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Louis Armstrong, Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie and more. There are also recent jazz figures such as Diana Krall, Esperanza Spalding, and even Michael Bolton singing Sinatra standards! The collection includes works licensed from legendary record labels, including Audiophile, Blue Note, Concord Jazz, Jazzology, Milestone, Nessa Records, Original Jazz Classics, Pablo, and Prestige. Also included are Marian McPartland’s Peabody Award winning Piano Jazz Radio Broadcasts and never before released performances from the Monterey Jazz Festival and great jazz venues. Jazz Music Library is part of Music Online: Listening Plus.

American Song provides online access to over 100,000 tracks from  every genre and music period of American history.