Fun Holiday Programmes

Have a look back at our April Holiday Programmes in the Learning Centres:
‘Lego Animation’ is always a good way to kick start the holidays! We had our young movie buffs directing and producing their own short animated movies over at Te Hāpua: Halwell Centre.

At Upper Riccarton, it was all about “reduce, reuse and recycle” with our new Earth Smart programme. The children loved the activity with the miniature recycling bins.

Here at South Learning Centre, the kids had fun completing challenges using the MBots in ‘Robofun’.

Kids at South also delved into 3D printing. Their challenge was to create their own desk organisers.

Everyone loves to receive positive feedback and we did for our ‘Chill Out Tunes’ programme in New Brighton.

“I’d like to provide glowing feedback. She loved it, learned a lot, and is excited and abuzz about the programme. As a parent, I loved that I got to hear the music she’d made, and got the music emailed to me. She also had a poster of herself as David Bowie, and a CD with a cover she’d made herself.  Big thanks and Kia ora to everyone involved”.

So, if you didn’t get a chance to pop in and see what was happening, then make sure to check out the ones coming up in July.  We have a few new goodies in there! So, watch this space (new holiday programmes will go live on Friday 1 June).

Tai Sila
Programmes, Design & Delivery Team

Undergraduate students in gowns in the quadrangle on their way to lecture rooms, Canterbury College: Picturing Canterbury

Undergraduate students in gowns in the quadrangle on their way to lecture rooms, Canterbury College [1926?]. File Reference CCL PhotoCD 14 IMG0085.
Founded in 1873, Canterbury College (now the University of Canterbury) was the second oldest university in New Zealand. The university was originally situated in the precinct of heritage listed buildings which is now known as the Christchurch Arts Centre prior to its relocation to the Ilam campus (beginning in 1961).

Do you have any photographs of Canterbury College? If so, feel free to contribute to our collection.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Credo Reference for ESL Students

Are you an ESL (English as a second language) student studying for a qualification in New Zealand? Are you looking for a dictionary which can clearly explain jargon in a Science subject or provide a context for understanding an issue in Social Sciences? Are you unsure about starting a research project or getting ideas to write an essay? If so, Credo Reference will provide a solution for you.

Credo Reference is an online reference resource which contains general and subject dictionaries and encyclopedias. It develops students’ information literacy skills necessary for success in academic life. For ESL students, Credo Reference can be used in two ways.

Credo Reference as an advanced dictionary

For ESL students, studying a subject in New Zealand is learning a language within a language. It is challenging to read an article full of jargon although you may have already reached a high level of English proficiency. The topic page of Credo Reference can be used as an advanced dictionary to support your learning. Let’s try the functions of Credo Reference with a specific example.

If you are studying Echinodermata in Marine Biology, you can type the term in the search box of the Credo Reference main webpage to gain a whole picture of the species. Not only does the Echinodermata topic page of Credo Reference give a definition of the term but also provides a thorough explanation including anatomy, physiology and different classes of the species. It also presents the term in a relational network with a mind map so that you will understand related concepts such as “urchin” and “sea otter”. Moreover, audio and visual aids on the page are helpful supplements for the text. By clicking the sound icon on the top of the page you can listen to the text. This audio aid is useful to familiarize yourself with academic talks and prepare you for attending seminars in this discipline. The images of Echinodermata give you an idea what the creatures look like in the real world.

Credo Reference as a starting-point for a research project or an essay

For ELS students, the difficulty in doing a research project or writing an essay in Social Science and Humanities is a lack of general knowledge on a topic due to their social and cultural backgrounds which may be very different from those of New Zealand. Credo Reference can solve this problem. For example, “ethnicity” is a topic appearing frequently on essay questions. Typing the word “ethnicity” in the search box of Credo Reference’s main page, you will see entries based on resources from various subjects such as anthropology, sociology and cultural studies. With these entries, you can understand the historical origin, controversies and debates around the concept. The mind map shows the relationship between ethnicity and race. They are a pair of concepts between which students are easily confused. Generally, Credo Reference enables you to understand a topic in context so that you can engage it with critical thinking and do further research on the topic.

To use Credo Reference, you need to join Christchurch City Libraries and use your library card number and password/PIN to access this eResource. Then, Credo Reference will provide you a successful learning experience.

Find more information

Hong Wang
Network Library Assistant

Be an Eco-Champ for Science Week

Start championing the environment. Become an Eco Champ –  here’s how:

This year’s Primary Science Week (14-18 May) is where the action is. Have a look to see how you can take part.

  • Find something that is important to your school
  • Record observations like the number of pieces of litter picked up on the beach, how many grams of soft plastic collected at school, the number of footprints on tunnel traps, chew marks on cards, observe number of birds at the local park or collect weed seeds off socks and count them.
  • Collect and record data over time and analyse it.
  • Discuss the changes you observed and suggest how you could find solutions.
  • Look at what happened after you made changes, what happened before and after.
  • Communicate what you did.

Take a look at our Science Fairs page and books for more information on getting scientrific!

Gardening

So why not pick a project you want to champion and get stuck in cleaning up the environment? Why not start a worm farm or compost heap at school for all those apple cores from your lunch boxes then use all that lovely compost to start a school vegetable garden? Be part of Sustainable Christchurch at home, in school or out in the community.

Become an environmentally friendly school with the help of Enviroschools and see what’s growing near you by visiting a community garden.

School Gardens

Learn how to grow your own food in school and start a school garden. There are lots of resources to help take a look at:

Recycling

Clean up rubbish at your school beach or local park or start a recycling scheme at your school or find out more about soft plastics recycling  Check out information on tackling litter and resources for school  from  Keep New Zealand beautiful. Check out how the Recycling plant (Material Recovery Facility) works and how to recycle right with these videos:

Find out all about recycling  and the 4R’s Reduce Reuse Recycle and Rebuy in these resources:

Eco-pests

Learn about what pests visit your school or park by making a tracking tunnel and chew cards. Find out how you can remove them from your school and community from Predator Free New Zealand. 

Become a weedbuster by cleaning up a local beach piece of bush or participate in the restoration of a local stream. Take a look at what to plant streamside in this handy booklet on what to plant produced by Christchurch City Council.

More information

Does your school already do a lot? Then share what you have done by making a poster, infographic, display or video.

Tell us what you are doing for National Primary Science Week. We’d love to hear.

Credo DK Eyewitness eBooks for Kids

Credo Reference is a great series of online eBooks that you can search and browse. Filled with pictures as well as information, they make a perfect starting point for that school project, or a interesting resource to satisfy a curious mind. Keep the kids entertained (and still learning) in the holidays, with this collection of eBooks.

Whatever they want to do when they grow up, we have it covered.

Meteorologist

Palaeontologist or Archaeologist

Astronaut or Astrophysicist

Geographer

Marine Biologist

Historian

Spy

What would you like to learn and do in Tūranga (New Central Library)? Have your say!

Kia ora. We need your input to help plan exciting programmes at Tūranga. Tell us the programmes you would be most interested in attending and what times would suit you best. This survey will take about 5 minutes to complete.

Have your say

This consultation runs from Friday 6 April to Sunday 6 May 2018.

About Tūranga

Due for completion later this year, Tūranga will occupy a prominent site on the corner of Gloucester Street and Cathedral Square.

Find out more:

Tūranga will be nearly 10,000 square metres in size, making it the largest public library in the South Island. It is part of a network of 19 community libraries, as well as a mobile library and a digital library. In 2017, the Christchurch City Libraries network hosted 3.7 million visits and issued almost 4.5 million items.

Stephen Hawking 101

Stephen Hawking has been called the most brilliant theoretical physicist since Albert Einstein. FI loved his appearances on the Simpsons and the fact he had a fan club. I also love the fact that whenever I hear a computer generated voice I associate it with the astrophysicist. From what I have read, he was very witty and had a great sense of humour as well as a brilliant mind, so he wouldn’t mind my blog about him. So here is some information about Stephen Hawking and about his work — learn about Quantum Mechanics and cosmology and black holes from my selection of class readings for Stephen Hawking 101.

I started with eDS (eResource Discovery Search) eDS search Stephen Hawking and which covers articles and books in our eResources collection.

Books

CoverRead Stephen Hawking’s bestseller A Brief History of Time that has sold more than 10 million copies. It only contains one equation E=mc² as Hawking was told the readership would be halved with every equation included.

Or try an eAudiobook if you would prefer to listen.

Articles

First off start with the basics, learn about black holes with this article by Stephen Hawking and his daughter Lucy Hawking

What is a black hole? By: Lucy, Hawking, Stephen, Clark, Dave, Ask, 15354105, , Vol. 10, Issue 6

Then once you have your head around the basics of black hole you may want to delve a bit deeper with this article from our Scientific American Archive.

The Quantum Mechanics of Black Holes pp34-41 by Stephen Hawking

More articles from Scientific American Archive

Science Reference Center has a selection of excellent scholarly articles –

Biographies

Find out more about Mr Hawking with these great biographical sources:

Biography in context has excellent information and even has ReadSpeaker text to speech technology so you can hear the biography been read in computer generated voice similar to the technology that Stephen Hawking used himself.
Biography Reference Center has a selection biographies from different sources.

CoverOr check out this eBook Introducing Stephen Hawking

If quantum mechanics is getting a bit much for you try this kids book written by Lucy Hawking and Stephen Hawking which is a great introduction to cosmology: George’s Secret Key to the Universe.

What I have learnt from reading about Stephen Hawking and his work is that I need to know more about astrophysics and not be scared of science.

The Normal School, Cranmer Square, Christchurch: Picturing Canterbury

The Normal School, Cranmer Square, Christchurch [192-?0]. File Reference CCL PhotoCD 17, IMG0010.
In Apr. 1873 the Canterbury Board of Education held a design competition for a projected normal school. The winner was S.C. Farr (1827-1918), a Christchurch architect, with a revised Gothic design. When the Normal School was completed in 1874 at a cost of £14,269, the Montreal Street wing measured 145 ft. and the Kilmore Street wing, 244 ft. The builder was Daniel Reese and William Brassington (b. 1840) the carver of the stone details.

In 1878 the Montreal Street wing was extended to provide a kindergarten on the ground floor and a training department on the first floor. The architect of the extension was Thomas Cane (1830-1905). In 1924-1925 the Teachers’ College students moved to a building on the corner of Montreal and Peterborough Streets. In 1954 the Normal School was transferred to Elmwood. The old school became the training centre for the Post-Primary Dept of Christchurch Teachers’ College. In 1970 they moved to Ilam and the building became subject to neglect, vandalism and decay. In Sept. 1981 it was sold to an investment company and between then and 1986 was converted to luxury apartments. The Board Room became a restaurant, Grimsby’s. The building was demolished following the 2011 Christchurch earthquakes.

Learn more about the architecture and history of the Normal School.

Do you have any photographs of the former Normal School building?  If so, feel free to contribute to our collection.

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Summer Holiday Activities

All ages are welcome at these activities. sessions are FREE, and they don’t require bookings (unless mentioned otherwise)! Join in from Tuesday 9 January 2018.

No-Sew Cushion Creation

Using cut material and a number of knots – create a super-cute ‘no sew’ cushion. Use it at home, or give it as a present!
Find out where and when these sessions are on: No-Sew Cushion Creation

Make a Pin Wheel Fan

Create a spinning fan to cool you off this summer by using simple materials like straws, paper, scissors, and pins.
Find out where and when these sessions are on: Make a Pin Wheel Fan

Summer Reading Photo Booth

Love reading and taking photos? Bring along your own device and take pics of yourself in our summer-themed photo booth. All ages welcome.
Find out where and when these sessions are on: Summer Reading Photo Booth

3D Printing Demo

Drop in and have a look at how 3D printing works.
Find out where and when these sessions are on: 3D Printing Demo

Bee-Bots

Help your Bee-Bots find their way around a map using entry-level coding.
Find out where and when these sessions are on: Bee-Bots

Create a Lion Note Holder

Use a special quilling tool and lots of bright craft materials to create your own super cute lion note holder. Library staff will help you with your creation. All craft material sourced from the MAKE Company. Free, but bookings are essential – phone 9417923.  For ages 5 to 12 years.
Find out where and when these sessions are on: Create a Lion Note Holder

Treasure in the Libraries

Come along to a taonga (treasure) themed school holiday session and discover what cool things are hidden in your library. Enjoy storytelling, go on a scavenger hunt to discover treasuers, and then get crafty and make a treasure box to take home. Free, but bookings are essential – phone 9417923.  For ages 5 to 12 years.
Find out where and when these sessions are on: Treasure in the Libraries

SEE ALSO: Summertime Reading Club

On until Friday 19 January 2018!

 

My Library – Robyn Chandler, Manager of Literacy Christchurch

Literacy Christchurch (formerly known as ARAS – Adult Reading Assistance Scheme) celebrates its 40th birthday today.  ARAS began on 13 December 1977 as a pilot scheme initiated by the Canterbury WEA (Workers Educational Association), with 8 volunteer tutors and 8 students.

Robyn Chandler, manager of Literacy Christchurch, talked to Jan Orme, Senior Library Assistant, Outreach and Learning Team for the sixth issue of our magazine uncover – huraina.

Professionally, what does the library mean to you?

So many things – university, education, nurturing, empowerment, research, choice, access to knowledge – the library is a place of instruction and delight, and such a key feature of a free society. It’s a world of information and cultural richness rather than a set of walls. Libraries have provided both education and entertainment for me.

And personally – what’s your favourite part of the library?

CoverDo I have to pick only one? I love the displays of artwork and artefacts, the children’s section and its sense of potential. I tend to focus on one area of a collection for a while – mountaineering, gardening, local history, music, art… recently the graphic novel collection (loved Northern Lights). But if I had to focus on just the one area because I had a time limit it would be the new books – there’s always something to find.

Would you please share some highlights of your own literacy journey?

CoverI remember sitting outside the University library on a bleak winter’s day reading the 19th century novel Wuthering Heights, the words collapsing the distances of history, space, and culture. I was there, on that “bleak hill-top,” lost in the “atmospheric tumult.”

On a professional level, it would have to be becoming a volunteer literacy tutor and having the privilege of meeting people from all walks of life and sharing their literacy journey for a time.

What would you say to your learners who are new to using the library?

I would want them to know that they are in charge of their library experience and that there are people available to support them with their library choices and needs. I would advise them to not be intimidated and to be aware of the resources available to them and that library staff are more than happy to help. The library is there for everybody; the library belongs to us all.

We’d love to see more of your learners in our libraries, what would be your best advice to help us achieve that?

The most important thing new library users need to see is a friendly face and to feel welcomed, to see proof that the library is there for them and their community. Some of our learners have English as an additional language and it would be nice to see more welcome signs in other languages. I’m really pleased to see that families are going to be able to take part in the Summer Reading challenges this year, this kind of activity encourages novice library users to participate in what’s going on in the library. Doing things with whānau can feel more natural than doing things alone.

What would be the one book you would take to a desert island?

I’m going to cheat – my desert island will have WiFi and I will be accessing the library’s great and growing collection of eResources. Me, my device, and more media than I’ll ever be able to get through … a whole world at my fingertips.

Read online in uncover- huraina issue 6, p 16

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