Thrilling crime – what are we waiting for…?

We’re over half way into 2018 now and there’s been some stellar reads so far in the crime genre.

CoverThe standout for me has been Jo Nesbo’s Macbeth – a gritty, dark, and violent retelling of the great Shakespeare tale of greed and corruption. Nesbo fairly nailed it with his retelling too, in my own opinion…

But what else can we be excited about, and what more do we have to look forward to for the rest of 2018? Let me tell you what we have in store from the ‘big three’!

CoverFirstly, there’s the new one from Frederick Forsyth called The Fox where a teenage boy becomes the world’s deadliest and most sought after weapon! Due in shops on September 17 and at the library shortly afterward.

Next there’s Number 13 in the Oregon Files; ‘Shadow Tyrants’ from Clive Cussler (& Boyd Morrison) – the crew of the Oregon are set to diffuse a situation between two warring factions over some ancient and very dangerous knowledge! Release date of September 17 for this one also…

And lastly we have the newest from the juggernaut of crime action fiction; James Patterson with ‘Target: Alex Cross’. The next installment sees Alex getting deeper and deeper into the assassination of the President, his wife is involved, and he’s having premonitions. Alex is given free rein at the FBI to hunt and chase the shooter…. Due out in bookshops on November 19 and we won’t be far behind!

So there’s a few to get excited about. I’m not certain they’ll live up to this year’s lofty standard set by Nesbo, but they’ll be good nonetheless!

Happy reading.

No coward soul…

I am the only being whose doom
No tongue would ask, no eye would mourn;
I never caused a thought of gloom,
A smile of joy, since I was born.

Oh Emily Brontë – how wrong you are! I don’t know if this poem of yours is autobiographical or not, but you really have caused many smiles of joy and thoughts of gloom, and all sorts of other feelings, since you were born 200 years ago on 30 July 1818 in West Yorkshire.

image_proxyThink how many people have swooned over Heathcliff – surely the ultimate Byronic hero – and been captivated by the passion and strangeness of Wuthering Heights, Emily’s only published novel. It is in many ways a brutal and nasty book, considered shocking when it was first published in 1847, but has stood the test of time to be considered one of the greatest novels in the English language.

Emily is also known for her intense, intellectual poetry, although reading ‘I am the only being whose doom‘ has made feel a tad bit gloomy. In her isolated, seemingly lonely life, did she really feel that she had to keep her emotions under control because they were corrupting her? Or has she created a narrator to explore her thoughts around emotions and the need to be loved? We’ll never know, for Emily Brontë is so very elusive, perhaps the most mysterious of her incredible family.

She is also a canvas on which other authors have speculated – both about her life and about some of the gaps in Wuthering Heights.

I don’t really know how comfortable Emily would be with all this continued attention, but I hope she knows that she’s appreciated the world over. We’ll certainly be remembering her on her birthday and her wonderful way with words. I’ll leave you with this quote I love from Chapter 9 of Wuthering Heights:

I’ve dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas: they’ve gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind.

Do you have any favourite Emily Brontë poems or quotes or Heathcliffs?

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