Musical Architecture of Band Rotundas

Brass bands developed as a popular form of musical entertainment in the late 19th century. By the early 20th century, many businesses and suburbs had their own bands, which would play for the public at weekends and during celebrations, as well as compete in competitions.

Sydenham Park : with reading room, band rotunda and water tower. [ca. 1900]. CCL PhotoCD 5, IMG0069
Sydenham Park : with reading room, band rotunda and water tower. [ca. 1900]. CCL PhotoCD 5, IMG0069
Band rotundas were built in many public spaces across the city to create permanent outdoor locations for the bands to play in and to help to project their music into the surrounding area. The rotundas also provided a space for public speeches and commemorations.

The opening of the Bandsmens Memorial rotunda, Botanic Gardens, Christchurch [19 September 1926] CCL PhotoCD 8, IMG0068
The opening of the Bandsmens Memorial rotunda, Botanic Gardens, Christchurch [19 September 1926] CCL PhotoCD 8, IMG0068
The band rotunda on Sumner beach [1911] CCL Photo Collection 22, Img01269
Edmonds Band Rotunda, viewed from Oxford Terrace [ca. 1930] CCL PhotoCD 10, IMG0072
General view of pier and enclosures : showing terminus of two trams and pier front. [ca. 1920] CCL PhotoCD 18, IMG0020
The oldest band rotunda in Christchurch was built in Latimer Square. This was relocated to Victoria Square in 1894, and later moved to Waltham Park after the Edmonds Band Rotunda was opened on the Avon in 1929. The Edmonds Band Rotunda, built in the High Renaissance style, was gifted to the city by Thomas Edmonds as part of a River Bank Improvement Scheme.

Another band rotunda built in the 1920s was the Bandsmen Memorial Rotunda in the Botanic Gardens, but this was built for very different reasons. This was the first memorial in New Zealand to be erected to the memory of bandsmen who died in the First World War. This rotunda was designed in the Classical style and was completed in 1926.

Free fun in the school holidays

The school hols are on from Saturday 7 July to Sunday 22 July. Here is what you can do that’s fun and FREE (and none require bookings, so you can just turn up):

LIBRARIES

Coolstuff will be visiting our libraries in the two weeks before KidsFest. Come along and say “Hi!” and be in to win some sweet prizes! Pick up a special KidsFest colouring sheet and a More FM Mata Riki Parade instruction sheet and you could win even MORE prizes! Free event, no bookings required.

Free, drop-in holiday activities

Free, drop-in holiday activities – there is no charge or booking required for these sessions.

  • Create your own mini world (sessions at various libraries and times)
    Come and make your own mini world or diorama using shoe boxes, plenty of craft materials and your imagination!
  • Shadow puppets Linwood Library at Eastgate, Tuesday 10 July 3pm to 4pm
  • Board games Linwood Library at Eastgate, Thursday 12 July 3pm to 4pm
  • Board games Linwood Library at Eastgate, Tuesday 17 July 3pm to 4pm
  • Makerspace Linwood Library at Eastgate, Wednesday 18 July 3pm to 4pm

Craft a Creature workshops are part of our Dr Seuss Creation Competition

Come to a free Craft a Creature workshop, where we’ll have loads of material available for use (the workshops are on from 10 July to 19 July).

KIDSFEST

Some KidsFest events are FREE (but make sure to check, as you’ll need to make a booking for some):

The Big Chill at Linwood Park – Saturday 7 July 12pm

Kicking off KidsFest 2018 is The Big Chill in Linwood Park, full of wacky activities, skate boarding, bouncy castles, faeries and fury creatures.

Brighton Buccaneers Treasure Trail – every day, 7am to 10.30pm New Brighton Beachside Playground

Come down t’ Brighton ‘n discover our treasure trail. Solve th’ clues, find th’ spot, get some evidence o’ yer findin’s (Take a rubbin’ o’ our hidden treasure) ‘n enjoy th’ surroundin’s!
Fun fer th’ whole family! If you want to give this a try, download the activity sheets or you can grab a sheet from the New Brighton library or from the New Brighton Union Church, cnr of Union and Collingwood Street. Subscribe to the Facebook event. Find out more.

New Brighton Beachside Playground.

Grass Games at One Central – every day, 8am to 6pm

Check out the new maze, sports pitch and giant board game imprinted on the One Central development area, just off Manchester Street between Hereford and Worcester.

Explore your city scavenger hunt – every day, 8.30am to 5pm, Christchurch i-Site Visitor Centre

Explore the central city on our self guided scavenger hunt, discovering new and interesting things along the way. This is a great way to learn more about what’s new and what’s happening your town! Participants who complete the scavenger hunt go into the draw to win cool prizes!

Dino Detectives – Discover the Giants of Gondwana – every day, 10am to 4pm, Botanic Gardens

There’s a dinosaur loose in the Botanic Gardens and it’s eating all the trees! Follow the trail to save the Gardens from a hungry dino.

The Story Vending Machine – at various KidsFest events

The Story Vending Machine, a breakthrough of perambulatory narrative technology, roams various locations during KidsFest dispensing custom-made fictions, fables and flights of fancy for all ages! If there are any cancelled due to weather conditions check out the KidsFest Facebook page for pop-up appearances in the Christchurch City Council Foyer.

KidsFest Church service – Sunday 8 July 10am to 10.45am

A Church service for kids held at the Cardboard Cathedral, Latimer Square. Church with a difference – fun, music, drama and who knows what?!

Elgregoe Magician at Eastgate – 9 to 15 July

Elgregoe Magician at Eastgate is appearing from Monday 9 to Sunday 15 July,  two shows daily at 11am and 1pm.

Grass Games: Little Kickers football coaching for 4-7yr olds – Tuesday 10 July

Run alongside KidsFest by the experienced coaches of Little Kickers, this is a fun “play not push” approach football coaching session tailored for young children aged 4 to 7. Hosted by Little Kickers Canterbury NZ and Gap Filler. Subscribe to the Facebook event.

Galactic night at the Museum – 10, 12, 17, 19 July

This July, join in the Galactic Night at the Museum.

Calling all space invaders, star trekkers and aliens. Explore a galaxy, not so far away, in an astronomical after-hours adventure at the Museum. Dress up as your favourite space character or creature and follow the clues to unscramble some amazing space facts. You could win a prize! Koha appreciated. Free and no bookings required.

Tuesday 10 July 6pm to 8pm
Thursday 12 July 6pm to 8pm
Tuesday 17 July 6pm to 8pm
Thursday 19 July 6pm to 8pm

Rockets and Robots Fun Day – Wednesday 11 July 10am to 4pm

See robots and rockets at the Air Force Museum! Discover how robots and rockets are used in our world! Check out one of the NZ Defence Force’s Explosive Ordnance Disposal robots* in action, and try on parts of their protective bomb suit. Get curious and learn more about the University of Canterbury’s own rockets and robots at this FREE, one-day-only event. Suitable for 3-13 year olds.

Cardboard Cathedral Tours – Wednesday 11 July and Wednesday 18 July 10am to 11am

Come and enjoy a tour of the Cardboard Cathedral – the only one made substantially of cardboard!

Springfree Jumpfest – Thursday 12 July and Thursday 19 July 10am to 3pm

Springfree Trampoline will be hosting a Jumpfest. Come along with your children for a fun day of jumping, games, prizes and enter the draw to win a trampoline. This will be weather dependent and we will advise on the morning of the event if it will be cancelled.

Breakmission – Saturday 14 July 1.30pm to 5.30pm

Breakmission Workshops with Keza Wardlaw and other recognised instructors teaching young people Hip Hop, Breakdance and Graffiti Art. Breakdance / B-Boy competition taking place, with dance demonstrations by a dance studio between competition phases.

Eastgate Colourful colouring in competition – Monday 16 to Friday 20 July

Eastgate’s Colourful colouring in competition is on from Monday 16 to Friday 20 July, 10am to 2pm.

Stampfest 2018 – Saturday 21 July 1.25pm to 3.45pm

Join in Stampfest “for a stamp filled afternoon where you can learn all about your stamps, various aspects of the hobby, its history and see how you can travel the world without leaving home.”

More FM Mata Riki KidsFest Parade – Saturday 21 July, 4.30 to 6.30pm

The More FM Mata Riki KidsFest Parade starts in Cathedral Square. Join an exciting exploratory night time journey through central Christchurch from Cathedral Square to The Terraces around the Ōtākaro/Avon River Precinct. Bring along your own creations, lanterns, wearable light art or torches. Mata Riki or Little Faces is connected with celebrating Māori New Year – the perfect match for the KidsFest Parade. Dress up warm.

KIDS MARKETS

MORE FREE FUN IN CHRISTCHURCH

For more events and activities, search Eventfinda.

Out on the Shelves: Connecting rainbow young people with the stories that represent them

I love reading books about characters like me. And I know I’m not the only one like that. Books, stories, movies – we all want to see ourselves in these. Because we’re all different, we’re all awesome, and we all have interesting tales to share.

When you’re reading about people, whether they’re fiction or non-fiction stories, books will fall into two categories: windows, or mirrors. And although one reader might see themself reflected in a particular story, their friend might not. That book is a mirror for the reader, and a window for their friend.

Books act like windows when they let us into different worlds. We do not see ourself in the character, because we are not like them. We read about a way of life that’s different from our own, and find out about other people’s beliefs, worries, hopes, and daily life. These stories help us learn more about this way of life, and might make things seem a bit less scary, if there are beliefs and customs we don’t know much about. ‘Window books’ help us develop empathy towards others.

“Mirror books’ let you see yourself represented in literature. You read about someone that lives the same way as you, that has the same interests, background, goals, and difficulties. It is like looking in a mirror. You see yourself reflected in the book, and feel pretty good that someone’s taken the time to write a book about a character like you … especially if that book has a positive outcome, and shows you that can have a fun life and overcome those those things that are a bit tricky for you! When you see someone like you in a book, you feel like you can do what that character can do.

But what happens when you don’t see yourself represented in the books you read?

If you are a member of a minority group (for example, you’re somewhere along the  LGBTQ* spectrum, or a person of colour, or you have a disability), you’re less likely to read books about people like you. It’s basic maths – people generally write what they know, and because there aren’t as many minority authors, there aren’t as many minority books.  Sure, there are lots of great stories and books out there, but sometimes you just want to read about someone like you. For lack of a better word, you want to be ‘normal’, rather than always being ‘other’.

Which brings us to ‘Out on the Shelves’ – an online reading resource connecting rainbow young people with the stories that represent them. This is the brainchild of the fantastic folks at InsideOUT, a group who work to make the country a safer and more welcoming place for young people of all different gender identities and sexualities.

Their goal with Out on the Shelves is to create a place where rainbow youth can find books by rainbow authors, and/or showing rainbow characters. The resource is just getting started, and so they are hoping to get people to review and suggest other titles in the future, but there are already a couple of really cool booklists to look at, and downloadable resources with even more specific characteristics (eg children’s books with rainbow characters, books with non-binary characters, and books with asexual characters).  I am really looking forward to seeing this resource grow into the future, and seeing what other great books there are that people recommend.

So if you, or someone you know, is looking to read a book about a rainbow character, check this resource out, then pop along to your local library and see which of the titles they’ve got on offer.

In the meantime, why not check out some of these other rainbow titles held at Christchurch City Libraries. And don’t forget, we love getting suggestions for new titles, so if there’s a great rainbow title you’d like us to add to our collection, let us know.

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  • The Pants Project by Cat Clarke: a  young transgender boy fights for his right to wear the right school uniform.
  • Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli: the book that inspired the movie ‘Love, Simon’, this is the story about the highs and lows of being gay at high school.
  • If I was your Girl by Meredith Russo: a book about a transgirl settling in to a new school, written by a transgender author, and with a trans model on the cover.
  • If you Could be Mine by Sara Farizan: Two girls in love in Iran, where homosexuality is forbidden.
  • They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera: how would you spend your last day, if you knew it was your last?
  • Georgia Peaches and Other Forbidden Fruit by Jaye Robin Browne: Joanna’s been an out lesbian for ages, but when her family moves to a church-going town, she also has to move back into the closet.
  • They, She, He, Me: Free to be! by Maya Christina Gonzalez: a book for little people and their big people, about why pronouns matter.

Booklists

Literary Prizes

InsideOut