Tutor available 24/7 – Lynda.com

Have you started studying this year and are feeling a little out of your depth? or do you want something to help you be at the top of your game. We have just the thing for you – a tutor available 24/7. Lynda.com has tutors for heaps of courses – to either help you with your studies, or try a course before you buy. Check out these great study starters to set you off on the right foot. All you need to get started is a library card and password/PIN.

 Learning Speed Reading

Learn how to read faster. Improve your reading speed and comprehension with these proven speed-reading techniques. Speed-reading is a skill everyone can benefit from, and this course provides proven techniques to improve how much information you absorb and how fast you absorb it.

 Learning Study Skills

Get tips for improving your reading speed and memory, creating detailed notes and preparing for tests. The information in this course is appropriate for all levels of learners, from school  to university students and full-time members of the workforce. Start watching now—you’ll never approach studying the same way again.

 Information Literacy

Information literacy is the ability to discover and use various types of information. It’s an essential skill for navigating the information age. Learn about strategies for finding information – from a library, archive, database or the internet – and the ethics of using what you find. This one is definitely one to trust – the tutor is a Librarian!

 Improving your Memory

Improve your memory with these memorization techniques. It explains the best methods for different situations, like remembering names, important dates, passwords, to-do lists, quotes, and more. These techniques will prove invaluable, whether you’re memorizing facts for a test at school, points for a work presentation, or trivia to impress your friends.

 Learning Algebra: Pre Algebra

Pre-algebra is the first step in high school math, forming the building blocks that lead to geometry, trigonometry, and calculus. This course will help you master the basics: from addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division to new types of numbers (integers and negative numbers) and concepts such as the order of operations and distribution.

What are they reading? New Zealand Opera’s Tosca

Opera has a reputation as a rather fancy, “highbrow” sort of pastime… but what do opera singers, conductors and directors read for fun (when it’s not all arias and librettos)? We asked the cast and crew of New Zealand Opera’s Tosca for some reading recommendations. Here’s what they’re enjoying:

Jacqueline Coats (Assistant Director)

I am reading Moonglow by American author, Michael Chabon, whose title jumped off the library shelf at me as I am obsessed with all things lunar at the moment (research for another opera production I am working on).  I was then sold by the author’s note – “In preparing this memoir, I have stuck to facts except when facts refused to conform with memory, narrative purpose, or the truth as I prefer to understand it”.  Who could resist that?!  And three-quarters of the way through, it has more than lived up to its promise.

Marco Guidarini (Conductor)

At the moment I’m reading a fascinating book by a well known italian art historian and journalist Matilte Battistini, called “Simboli e Allegorie”, a fascinating journey through alchemy and magic in the history of art. It’s an extraordinary essay revealing an enormous amount of information concerning the symbols of artistic iconography through the centuries.

James Benjamin Rodgers (Spoletta)

American Caesar: Douglas MacArthur by William Manchester. Only 30% of the way through but fascinating look at the man who exerted huge influence in the Pacific during WWII. Amazing to read about that time and the people that made key decisions in the armed defence of their nations.

Teddy Tahu Rhodes (Baron Scarpia)

I’m not actually reading anything in particular at the moment but a book that has always stayed with me is In the heart of the sea by Nathaniel Philbrick. The story of the loss of the whaling ship The Essex back in 1820. It was made into a movie which in no way did the full story justice in my opinion. An epic, true and unimaginable historical journey that I was gripped by. It was recommended to me and I wholeheartedly recommend it to anyone.

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