The Five Book Challenge

There are many great book challenges out there such as the A-Z book challenge (where you read books by authors with surnames beginning with A right through to Z) or the 52 book for 52 weeks of the year challenge but sadly, my year, and my bookshelf, were too short to attempt either of these.

Instead, I took on a somewhat easier book challenge which involved reading five books in genres you don’t usually read. The idea is to broaden your horizons  (i.e. stop the PG Wodehouse and Agatha Christie binge reading that I am very prone too) and try something different. My picks were Mills and Boon, science fiction, young adult, western, and fantasy, all genres I have never had the time (or, I’m sorry too say, inclination) to read. The nice thing about taking on any sort of challenge is that once you have vaguely mentioned it to understanding family (who incidentally had hysterical laughing fits and commented on how the mighty fallen re the Mills and Boon…) that you are thinking of doing one, you are, indeed committed.

MILLS AND BOON: The Librarian’s Passionate Knight

CoverMy Mills and Boon pick was The Librarian’s Passionate Knight (of course, this had to be any respectable librarian’s Mills and Boon pick). Phoebe is a lonely, bespectacled librarian (note: contrary to popular novelist’s opinion, it is not part of our job description to wear glasses), whose only real joy in her life is her job. One night, she is accosted by her stalkerish ex-boyfriend as she walks down the street. Enter gorgeous billionaire Daniel Barone and his “rock hard abs” who happen to be strolling by at the time. Happily for Phoebe, Daniel (and his rock hard abs) come gallantly to her rescue and an amazing romance begins. There is mention of Phoebe’s tragic past- (with an alcoholic parent and an abusive boyfriend thrown into the sad mix)- and then we are of course back to Daniel’s rock hard abs (Gerard is an author who presumably believes in prioritising). Of course it is the chemistry between the two that audiences are after, and happily there is plenty. This was a light, enjoyable  (though admittedly not especially deep) read. I can see why so many people get addicted to this genre as it is certainly a lot of fun. A good introduction to Mills and Boon? I would (cautiously- and very quietly so my family won’t hear me), say yes.

SCIENCE FICTION: The Hitch-hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

Cover

As soon as I mentioned to my all-knowing hubbie that I needed a sci fi read, I was told that The Hitch-hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams was my perfect match. I couldn’t argue. I was hooked from page one by Adams’ wondrous mix of fantasy and Wodehouse/Milligan-ish humour (I mention this as an avid fangirl of the two). Lines like:

A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools”

could have come straight from Plum himself, and inspired lunacy such as:

“Not unnaturally, many elevators imbued with intelligence and precognition became terribly frustrated with the mindless business of going up and down, up and down, experimented briefly with the notion of going sideways, as a sort of existential protest, demanded participation in the decision-making process and finally took to squatting in basements sulking” 

is certainly on a par with the great Spike Milligan.

As to the story, it all begins one Thursday afternoon as Arthur Dent protests the upcoming destruction of his house to make way for a new bypass. Unfortunately, the earth too is scheduled for demolition that day to make way for a hyperspace bypass. Arthur and his friend, a hitchhiker from another planet, soon find themselves the sole survivors of the demolition and armed with nothing but their towels and a book which displays the words ‘DON’T PANIC’, they begin their journey of inspired lunacy through the galaxy. I inevitably made my way through the series in far shorter time than I would have liked. Happily though, each book is sheer genius, a sure winner even for those who, like me, are not really big on fantasy.

YOUNG ADULTS: Wildlife

CoverMy awesome colleague and YA expert Alina (who also blogs, plug plug) recommended me Wildlife by Fiona Wood.  As a big fan of I Capture the Castle style YA (i.e well written, with a good plot, which is just as good to read if you’re an adult), this was an ideal match for me. Told by two narrators (which I didn’t actually realise until a quarter of the way through, YA readers are obviously far more on the ball – or just far more awake- than me), ‘Wildlife’ tells the story of two girls’ experiences attending a school wilderness camp. Lou is recovering from the tragic death of her young boyfriend- while Sib is simply trying to survive a toxic friendship and her first romance. Clever, touching and memorable, ‘Wildlife’ is a joy to read and certainly got me hooked on Fiona Wood. I did, incidentally, read Cloudwish straight after this, a gorgeous read about the teenage daughter of a Vietnamese immigrant family. A fabulous introduction to YA (thanks Alina!!).

FANTASY: Good Omens

CoverGood Omens – An angel and demon working together to bring about the apocalypse- a bit of confusion about where exactly the young anti Christ got to – what could possibly go wrong? Happily for fans of Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman, plenty, and it makes for fabulous reading.
Though admittedly the middle part of this did drag a bit for me (with a little too much back and forth between multiple characters, some of whom just didn’t interest me as much), this was a thoroughly enjoyable read far worth pursuing till its fabulous end. A hilarious, clever read, ”Good Omens’ is a wonderful fantasy novel to start on. Pratchett and Gaiman really are a writing team made in heaven.

WESTERN: Riders of the Purple Sage

CoverRiders of the Purple Sage tells the story of Jane Withersteen, a 28 year old Mormon woman facing pressure to marry one of the polygamous elders of her community. Brave, fair but determined to keep the peace, Jane is also faced with the problem of continuing her friendship with two friends – one of them a notorious gunman and killer of Mormons.

A constant on classic Western lists, ‘Riders of the Purple Sage’ has influenced many other Western novels due to its winning formula of romance, action, strong plot, and evocative descriptions of the American West (there are a lot of descriptions of sage incidentally – much, much, sage – in fact, there are no descriptions of sage that Zane Grey does not like). While some may argue this classic is now a little dated, it remains an engaging read and, I imagine, a must for fans of this genre

With the New Year coming up it is the perfect time to set yourself a book challenge- why not try one out? There is a great list of 2018 reading challenges by Popsugar and of course there is our own library book challenge this summer for kids and one for the adults too. Whatever stage you are at (whether you have just finished a book challenge or are about to make a start) we’d love to know. Feel free to leave a comment below. Good luck and of course have fun!

4 thoughts on “The Five Book Challenge

  1. Gallivanta 15 December 2017 / 12:36 am

    I enjoyed the Mills and Boon display/lucky dip etc at the Fendalton Library, although I decided not to dip this time. I did create a book title for the Mills and Boon board which, of course, I have forgotten although I was pleased with it at the time.

    • helenccl 15 December 2017 / 12:10 pm

      Love the idea of a ‘create a title’ Mills and Boone board! 🙂

      • Gallivanta 15 December 2017 / 12:53 pm

        It was brilliant fun.

  2. Donna 15 December 2017 / 8:54 am

    Those titles are magical at times, definitely entertaining!

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