#Covfefe … or ‘President Trump and Shakespeare are more alike than you might think’

“This morning, I was completely covfefe’d. I arrived for a training session at one location, but didn’t realise the training had been moved to a different part of town. Oops!”

See what I did there? I used a word that didn’t exist 24 hours ago, and you probably understood what I meant by it. Donald Trump, the 45th President of the United States, has created a word, and now everyone is using it. Sure, we don’t *actually* have an exact meaning for that word at this precise moment in time, but Twitter, Urban Dictionary, and keyboard warriors world-wide are working on that, and I predict that ‘covfefe’ will be a word that we hear more of in the future.

CoverKnow who else created loads of new words that people had never heard of, but that we now use all the time in everyday conversation? William Shakespeare, a guy from 17th-century England who was (depending on your opinion) either the world’s greatest playwright, or the man we have to blame for making us suffer through never-ending plays where everyone wanders round in disguise, talks to ghosts, and takes an absolute age to die (Romeo Montague, I’m looking at you!).

Let’s face it, Shakespeare’s plays aren’t the easiest things to read – they have way more than 140 characters, there are some really weird words in there that we don’t use now, and the film adaptations your English teacher shows you are most probably ancient, with bad lighting and hideous makeup and special effects. … And people talking really… really… really slowly, so the whole thing sucks up hours of your life that you can’t get back.

CoverWhen it’s that hard to read his plays, you might be asking yourself a few questions: Why’s this guy so famous? Why do people think he’s such a great playwright (that’s the fancy name for an author who writes plays instead of books)? Who reads plays, anyway? and Why do I need to read this when it has nothing to do with real life in 2017?! I asked lots of those same questions myself, because studying Shakespeare every year of high school was about as fun as gouging my eyes out with a rusty spoon. (OK, fine, I haven’t actually tried that to see just how much fun it is, but I can imagine it probably isn’t too far off hearing the Bard’s words mangled by teenage girls and desperately trying to stay awake as the teacher made us analyse every. single. word. and discuss exactly why this actor had to exit on this side of the stage and not that side).

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But … SPOILER … Shakespeare was a really cool guy! He actually wanted his audiences to enjoy his plays, he invented loads of new words that we still use today, and his plays are like the soap operas of today – 1600s Shortland Street, if you will. He wrote some really cool stories about love, life, lust … and loss … and he wanted us, his audience, to have fun with his plays, and escape from their normal, everyday life. He wanted us to get caught up in the murders and passion and insanity so that we forget about the normal, boring, everyday things like homework, looking after your annoying family members, or the fact you’ve just broken up with the love of your life.

HE DIDN’T WANT US TO BE BORED SENSELESS!

So, how can we make Shakespeare more fun? Easy. Basically whatever type of book you like to read, there will be something to do with Shakespeare that it will be easier to read than the plays you’re doing at school.

Graphic novels are like watching a movie on a page. You can look at the pictures, which makes it so much easier to work out what’s actually going on.

CoverThere are pick-a-path versions of his plays where you put yourself in to the story, and choose what happens. Want to play Hamlet as a girl? Do it. Want to turn Romeo and Juliet into aliens and send them off to a distant planet? Do it. Want to cause a zombie invasion or apocalypse and just end the story early? Guess what, do it. Because you can. You can even follow the story the same way Shakespeare wrote it, if you want to.

Learn how to swear and insult people, or find out more about the gross, stinky, and ugly parts of Shakespearian life with some informative non-fiction.

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Prefer to read on your device? Not a problem. There’s a whole series of eBooks that at retell his plays in normal language so they actually make sense. And they’re written by authors who write normal books, so they’re heaps easier to read.

If you prefer reading fictional, made-up stories, there are heaps that have Will as a character, or are based around his life and plays. Some of these have more Shakespeare in them than others, but there could be something that you like the look of, so have a look at them and see what there is. I wouldn’t quote these in your NCEA exam, but you could still learn some interesting facts.

The last, and quite possibly best, way to get excited about Shakespeare – Hamlet: The Video Game (The Stage Show)! Christchurch’s own Court Theatre is putting on a show of William Shakespeare’s Hamlet as a video game, and it looks A. MA. ZING! We’ve been chatting to The Court Theatre about this show and it sounds like a must-see.

If you hate Shakespeare, go see it – it has action and guns! If you love Shakespeare, go see it – it’s Hamlet! If you need to take someone on a date, go see it – it’s the theatre, but it’s also a video game! Seriously, guys, this show sounds like it is going to have something for everyone.

Hamlet: The Video Game (The Stage Show) is on at The Court Theatre from June 3 to June 24, and tickets are only $24. I reckon that sounds like a bargain for this show. I can’t wait to see it!

Win tickets to the NZSO Schumann & Barber concert

NZSO posterThe New Zealand Symphony Orchestra are in town again this month with a concert featuring works by Brahms, Schumann and Barber on 21 June at the Isaac Theatre Royal.

The pieces performed will be:

We have 2 double passes to give away to library members. All you need to do is tell us the name of Christchurch City Libraries’ Quarterly magazine and complete the competition entry form. Entries close at 5pm on Monday, 12 June and winners will be announced on Tuesday 13 June.

Harold Parsons, Horse and Cart: Picturing Canterbury

Harold Parsons, Horse and Cart, 1915. Kete Christchurch. PH14-AlTu-harold_parsons_-_horse_and_cart. Entry in the 2014 Christchurch City Libraries Photo Hunt by Alan Turner. CC-BY-NA-SA-3.0 NZ.

Harold Parsons in suit with three children. Child on Harold’s knee is Basil Turner (later general manager of Turners Office Products, Colombo & Tuam St), others unknown.

Location: St Martins, Christchurch.

Date: circa 1915

Kete Christchurch is a collection of photographs and stories about Christchurch and Canterbury, past and present. Anyone can join and contribute.

Do you have any further information about this photo? If so, please share it with us by leaving a comment.

Ciao Italia! a showcase of Italian fun, food and fanfare – Wednesday 14 June at The Colombo

​​​Ciao Italia – showcasing Italian fun, food and fanfare
Wednesday 14 June 2017, 6pm to 9.30pm at The Colombo
363 Colombo Street, Sydenham – Christchurch

Fancy a trip to Italy but the budget won’t stretch quite that far? Well, here’s your opportunity to experience the next best thing without having to get on a plane! Throughout June, Italy will in fact be coming to The Colombo. This will culminate in Christchurch’s first ever Ciao Italia festival on Wednesday 14 June.

As we all know, Christchurch has seen an influx of new residents in the last few years. Italians have been among the many attracted to our shores and have brought with them their inimitable flair. Ciao Italia will showcase some of this flair in the form of fashion, home and art design, and beautiful cars.

Ciao Italia Poster

And of course, as befits any self-respecting Italian festival, there will be food and wine! You will be able to feast your palate on both imported and locally-made delicacies such as wild-pig prosciutto, cold meats, all kinds of delicious cheeses, gnocchi, pasta, espresso coffee, and even edible gold leaf.

The entertainment line-up includes:

  • Luca Manghi on the flute and David Kelly on the piano playing Donizetti (Sonata per flauto e pianoforte), Briccialdi (Concerto per flauto e pianoforte) and Mascagni (Intermezzo from Cavalleria Rusticana), and the Canterbury Cellists playing Antonio Vivaldi’s Four Seasons;
  • Claudia Lues and the WEA Italian Singing Group singing Italian canzoni; and
  • the Dante dancers performing a traditional Tarantella.

Luca Manghi (flute) and David Kelly (piano) Canterbury Cellists poster

You will be able to chat with representatives of the Italian Programme of Research in Antarctica and of the Italian Chamber of Commerce in New Zealand, which is organising the event.

Make sure to also say Ciao to the students and members of the Dante Alighieri Society. This cultural society for lovers of all things Italian hosts monthly talks, film screenings, the Cartolina radio programme on Plains FM, and book clubs (one in English and one in Italian), as well as managing a very successful Italian language school.

Cinema Italiano logoCiao Italia runs from 6pm to 9.30pm and coincides with the opening night of the Cinema Italiano NZ Festival.

Fear not, though, because you won’t have to choose one over the other: very conveniently the Cinema Italiano Festival is also being held at The Colombo, in the Academy Gold Cinema.

The Festival opens at 7.30pm with complimentary aperitifs and appetisers before screening Roman Holiday, the 1953 classic romantic comedy which made Audrey Hepburn a star. Plenty of time therefore to visit Ciao Italia before the film begins.

Roman Holiday
Have you entered our give away competition for a double pass to the opening night of Cinema Italiano Festival? If not, get in quick!

So circle Wednesday 14 June in your diary and spread the word. Let’s make this first Ciao Italia festival a great success so that it may become a regular occurrence in the events calendar of our ever more cosmopolitan city. And, why not, let’s show Wellington and Auckland that Mainlanders do it better!

See you there!

P. S. For more information visit www.ciaoitalianz.com
Keen to be an exhibitor? Fill in the registration form on the Ciao Italia NZ website ASAP!

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Our library catalogue has lots of resources for Italophiles: