Pippi Longstocking – 70 years young, and still going strong

I remember reading Astrid Lindgren’s Pippi Longstocking as a child, and thinking what a wonderful, exciting life this nine-year-old girl had. With no adults to tell her what to do, a pet monkey and horse who lived in her house, and two good friends who lived right next door with whom she could have adventures every day, this girl – to my young brain, at least – was living the dream.

CoverNow, I know that reading books as a child is different from reading books as an adult – I’m sure lots of us have had fond memories of a childhood favourite, re-read it as an adult, and been bitterly disappointed by the experience. However, I have just read the Lauren Child-illustrated version of Pippi Longstocking, and I am very pleased to announce that this was not the case. It is still just as magical a read as ever, whether you are re-reading it as an adult, sharing it with your own child or grandchild at bedtime, or discovering it for the first time as a nine-year-old.

There are eleven chapters in this book, each of which is a story in itself. With titles such as ‘Pippi is a thing-searcher and ends up in a fight’, ‘Pippi plays tag with the police’, and ‘Pippi dances with burglars’, you know right from the start that there will be plenty of action, trouble-making, and laughter, and you are not disappointed. With very little regard for social expectations, Pippi says what she thinks, does what she wants, and goes where she pleases, causing confusion for the adults around her, and delighting the neighbourhood children … and the reader. She does not feel bound to do things the conventional way, and I enjoyed reading about her unique attempts at baking, her creative attitude to schoolwork, and the tales she tells of her adventures with her father. These are not necessarily true tales, but since ‘[her] mamma is an angel and [her] pappa is king of the natives … how can you expect her always to tell the truth?’

Although Lindgren first wrote about Pippi seventy years ago, the story has not dated, and Tiina Nunally’s translation and Child’s illustrations ensure that it is just as much fun for children in 2017 as it was in 1945, when it was first published. A friend’s six-year-old daughter was reading this book at the same time as I was, and the fact she was so excited to share with me her favourite parts of the story speaks volumes about how this story has endured over the years.

Lauren Child’s illustrations are absolutely fantastic, and really help to bring Pippi to life. Through her customary collage style of art, Child captures Pippi’s cheeky nature, and you cannot help but smile at the colourful interpretations of the events taking place. This particular edition of this book is just begging to be shared with young readers, and will ensure that Pippi’s adventures are enjoyed by children (and their adults) for years to come.

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Te Rerenga Kōrero – Hāua te pōro!

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori – The Māori Language Commission publish weekly Māori phrases that can be used to support or cheer someone on.

Hāua te pōro!
Hit the ball!

akina te reo rugby

It’s the year of the Rooster, but I’m a Rat

I was aCoverbout 20 when I encountered Chinese New Year for the first time. We were holidaying in Hong Kong, which was British in those days and went across the border to The People’s Republic of China.

It was amazing. Bicycles were loaded up with decorations. Everyone was getting readily for New Year. I wished that I was going to be in China for a while longer. I would have loved to have seen it.

During New Year, red is everywhere. It is the colour of luck and happiness. Children receive money wrapped in red paper. Adult exchange poems written on red paper. The Chinese New Year is also an opportunity to remember ancestors, and to wish peace and happiness to friends and family. The lunar new year begins on Saturday 28 January. 2017 is the year of the Red Fire Rooster.

Are you a Rat, a Rooster or one of the other animals? Find out!

The holiday ends with the Festival of Lanterns. In Christchurch, The Lantern Festival will be held on 17-19 February. The best time to see the lanterns is after dark, but if you can’t get there at night, a day time visit is worth while. At night, the lanterns are bright colours in a dark park. During the day, the lanterns are not lit, but are colourful reds and yellows in a green park.

CoverIf you are interested in learning Mandarin and Cantonese Chinese, We have a collection of books and language courses to suit all levels. We also have Mango Languages. This is an online learning system that will help you learn many languages. It also has lessons for learning English for speakers of Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean and Japanese speakers. Use at a library or enter your library card & password / PIN.

CINCH is our Community Information Christchurch database. It has a list of a range of religious, arts and cultural organizations that meet the needs of the Chinese community.

For more information about the Lunar New year: