All the ways to share a bike

Library staff cycling through Christchurch town centre, At the intersection of High, Manchester and Lichfield Streets. 1980s
Library staff cycling through Christchurch town centre, At the intersection of High, Manchester and Lichfield Streets. 1980s, Flickr: Arch-52-PH-07-21

Christchurch and cycling have always gone well together. That winning combination of flat terrain and wide roads makes the Garden City a great place to cycle. With new cycleways rolling out around the city, it’s becoming more and more bike friendly.

Assuming that you have a bike, that is.

Luckily there are options for people who don’t have their own wheels to pootle about on.

Spark Bikes

Similar to the “Boris Bikes” of London, Spark Bikes offer those in Central Christchurch the opportunity to travel further than their feet can take them, but without the hassles of parking.

The bikes, which come complete with a lock and adjustable helmet, are available at 5 stations around the central city and can be used for 30 minutes, free of charge. Additional time is charged at $4 per hour, or a bike can be borrowed for a full day for $20.

Kind of like a library but with bikes instead of books!

Station locations, Spark Bikes

There is an initial $4 charge to register and “borrowing” is managed either via an app or the mobile website, so it’s also quite smartphone dependent. The project is currently in pilot so may extend to more bikes and more stations in the future.

RAD Bikes

RAD stands for “Recycle A Dunger” and is a not-for-profit initiative that takes donated, unwanted bikes and parts and helps turn them into rideable bikes.

From their shed headquarters (shedquarters?) at 70 Kilmore Street, RAD Bikes provides all the tools, equipment, parts and expertise to help get your bike roadworthy. They also gift recycled bikes to charity organisations.

ICECycles

“Inner City East” Cycles runs bike maintenance workshops to help people get their rides ready for the road. They also accept donations of bicycles and bike parts.

Bikes for Madagascar

If you’re in the envious position of having too many bicycles then maybe you’d be interested in exercising a little bicycle altruism?

Madagascar is one of the poorest countries in the world and access to education and healthcare is a real issue for people who live in remote areas.

a large number of people living in rural communities could not afford to get to a health facility when they needed it. They were totally reliant on volunteer community health workers (CHWs) to travel to them. Most of these CHWs have to walk to visit sick patients. But, if you give them a bike then suddenly they can cover three times the distance!

The plan is to collect 400 adult size mountain bikes and ship them to Northern Madagascar. The collection day is on Saturday 15 August: Bikes need to be dropped off at SB Global Logistics, 11 Syd Bradley Road, Dakota Business Park (next to the Christchurch Airport). If you can’t make it on the collection day: You can drop your bike at an alternative location by Friday 14 August at Limitless Supplements, 22 Stanley St, Sydenham.

If there are surplus bikes these will be donated to ICECycles for local use.

For more on bikes and cycling

Budgie Manor – Community Read of Magpie Hall

Part One of our Community Read of Magpie Hall by Rachael King was tea and tales (and cake) on Friday morning.

Part Two on Friday evening was a night of improv and laughs. South Library was the venue, and there was a good-sized crowd.

Community Read audience

We had a nice introduction from Rachael, Councillor Phil Clearwater, and Libraries Manager Carolyn Robertson.

Then it was onto the comedy. The two improvvers were very clever, making good use of some props, wordplay, and guest appearances from the audience. Magpie Hall became Budgie Manor in a variety of fast and furious skits, and roars from the audience peppered the show.

Improv - Community Read

The night ended with some book prizes being given out, and book signings.
Rachael King signs copies

Plus a little more cake.
Cake

See our photos of the Community Read events and Magpie Hall displays.

The sailor of Victoria Square: Captain James Cook

83 years ago today on 10 August 1932 the Captain Cook statue in Victoria Square created by local sculptor William Trethewey was unveiled by the Governor-General of the time, Lord Bledisloe.

Unveiling of the Captain Cook statue in Victoria Square by the Governor-General

It is a marble figure on a granite base, the inscription upon which reads –

James Cook, Captain, Royal Navy, circumnavigator who first hoisted the British flag in New Zealand and explored her seas and coasts, 1769–70, 1773–4, 1777

Although the statue survived Christchurch’s quakes undamaged, his dignity has taken something of a blow recently as he currently sports a jaunty, distinctly Cantabrian hat.Captain Cook with traffic cone hat

Though his environs and view may have changed a bit in recent years, still he stands, looking always towards the sea…

For more about Captain Cook

Te Kupu o Te Wiki – Oho (awake)

Kia ora. To encourage the use of Te Reo Māori we are publishing weekly kupu (words) and phrases that can be used with children.

Kiwaha (idiom)

Wēkeneru
Holy moly

Kupu (word)

oho
awake

Kua oho mai koe.
You’re awake.

Whāngahia te Reo

 

This week in Christchurch history (10 to 16 August)

10 August 1840
Captain Owen Stanley in HMS Britomart dashes to Akaroa and raises the British flag to proclaim sovereignty over the South Island. Read our digitised copy of Mission of the Britomart at Akaroa.

10 August 1932
Statue of Captain James Cook unveiled in Victoria Square.

11 August 1923
Christchurch Radio Society begins regular radio transmission with station 3AC.

15 August 1872
Novelist Anthony Trollope visits. Search DigitalNZ for information on his trip.

15 August 1945
V.J. (Victory over Japan) day celebrations. View more photos of V.J. Day in Christchurch.

Some of the crowd who celebrated VJ Day (14 August 1945) shown at the corner of Strowan and Normans Roads, Bryndwr [Aug. 1945]
Some of the crowd who celebrated VJ Day (14 August 1945) shown at the corner of Strowan and Normans Roads, Bryndwr [Aug. 1945], CCL Photo Collection 22, Img02312
15 August 1981
Massive demonstrations in Christchurch against rugby test between All Blacks and Springboks. See our collection of posters.

They've brought their National Sport with them. [1981]
They’ve brought their National Sport with them. [1981], CCL-Ephemera-Springbok-1981-08-15-EPH06-01
16 August 1868
Tsunami (“tidal wave”) in Lyttelton Harbour. Part of the harbour bottom was laid bare, then a wave swept in, damaging the “Novelty”. Read Bank Peninsula Impact 1868, Willem de Lange and Eileen McSaveney. ‘Tsunamis – New Zealand’s tsunami history’, Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 9-Jul-13

16 August 1890
First inter-provincial soccer match held in Christchurch. Canterbury beat Wellington 2-0

More August events in the Christchurch chronology: a timeline of Christchurch events in chronological order from pre-European times to 1989.