Where the streets do have names

Christchurch street and place names is our treasure of a resource by local history expert Margaret Harper. You can use it to explore the history of local streets and places, and uncover how they got their names:

She had some tips from the latest update:

Cover of The First 100 pilots
The Canterbury Aviation (N.Z.) Co.: the first hundred pilots [1918]

Wigram Skies

Many streets have been recently named after the first pilots trained at the Sockburn Flying School. See Gattrell Drive  – named after Air Commodore Gartrell who was Commanding Officer at Wigram from December 1965 to January 1966. (See our digitised resource The Canterbury Aviation (N.Z.) Co.: the first hundred pilots).

Morse Road

Morse Road in Wigram was named after Hori George Alfred Morse (1897-1983). Morse is listed in The Canterbury Aviation (N.Z.) Co.: the first hundred pilots. Morse was a student of Bignell Street, Wanganui. He graduated from the Canterbury Flying School on 17 May 1918. He was sentenced to life imprisonment for murder in 1924:

At Adelaide he caught up with the Medic, and, going aboard, found Mrs. Hunter with a group of other passengers. She did not receive him too warmly, but, at his request, accompanied him on to the wharf, where, at the end of one of the goods sheds. He shot her dead with a revolver which he afterwards turned upon himself. Morse’s account of the shooting was that he always carried his revolver, which, while he was showing it to Mrs. Hunter, went off accidentally.

Tall, slim and boyish, he has a countenance of almost beauty. There is nothing of the accepted criminal type about his face, and his Handsome features suggest rather the poet or the artist, than the reckless airman, or devil-maycare soldier of fortune that his record makes him. He has a knack of making and keeping friends, and m Adelaide there are some who are not ashamed to admit their love for the condemned man.

New Zealander In Death Cell. Was The Shot Accidental? Former Wanganui Boy Condemned For Shooting His Ex-Paramour Hori’s Many-Colored Career —Loyalty Of Friends Under Shadow Of Gallows. NZ Truth , Issue 971, 5 July 1924, Page 6:

Ellerton and Jameson Avenue

This was the Wizard’s house. Through it I was able to correct Jameson Avenue which I had thought was named after an early Christchurch mayor but in fact was named after his son who was the owner of Ellerton. (see Lost Christchurch)

A wooden two-storey building on McFaddens Road. Albert Bullock (1833-1902), a gentleman, and his wife, Elizabeth Jane Mary Bullock owned the property from the 1890s. Albert is first listed in street directories living there in 1896. Following his death at Ellerton in 1902, Mrs Bullock returned to England and the property was bought by George Jameson (1850-1934), a prominent businessman. He lived there with his wife Agnes (1855?-1924) Ellerton was later the home of the Wizard, Ian Brackenbury Channell, and his fiancée, Alice Flett. It was destroyed in a suspicious fire on 8 September 2003.
Jameson Avenuewas named after George Jameson. For a time he was secretary and general manager of the New Zealand Co-operative Association in

Christchurch. His father James Purvis Jameson (1824-1896) was the mayor of Christchurch in 1871.

The Militia List

Developers have just used the Militia List on our website to name streets in a new subdivision.

Adult Learners’ Week — He Tangata Mātauranga: an opportunity to try something new

My grade three teacher confused me. He told me that he learned something new every day. How could that be? He was a teacher and he knew everything. My grandmother and her sister added to my primary school-aged confusion by telling me that they enjoyed learning new things all the time. What was going on? Adults know everything.

What I didn’t realise then, but I am well aware of now, is that adults don’t know everything, and that many, if not most, like learning new skills and information, and expanding their horizons by trying new experiences. The importance of this lifelong learning is celebrated every year during  Adult Learners’ Week — He Tangata Mātauranga.

Adult Learners' Week brochureThe library fosters learning at all times, of course, but during Adult Learners’ Week it particularly encourages you to learn something new and to celebrate your successes and achievements as a lifelong learner. If you want to take on a new challenge, I recommend you:

Adult Learners’ Week also incorporates International Literacy Day on 8 September. Find out about our English Language Skills resources for both people with literacy difficulties and their tutors.

Te Kupu o te Wiki – The Word of the Week

Kia ora. To celebrate Te Reo Māori we are publishing kupu (words).

Kīwaha (colloquialism)

Aheiha
Hard

Kupu (word)

Niho
tooth

Kua hawa tōku niho i au.
I have chipped my tooth.

Maori
Browse our Te Reo Māori resources.

This week in Christchurch history (8 September – 14 September)

8 September 1850
Sir George Seymour” leaves Plymouth with settlers.

11 September 1928
Kingsford-Smith and his crew (Ulm, Litchfield and McWilliams) land at Wigram in “Southern Cross” after the first trans-Tasman flight. A crowd of 30,000, alerted by all-night radio broadcasts, had gathered at the airfield.

The Southern Cross. [Sept. 1928] Charles Kingsford-Smith (1897-1935) made the first Tasman flight from Sydney to Christchurch, arriving at Wigram Aerodrom on 10 Sept. 1928. His aircraft is pictured on arrival. Christchurch City Libraries, CCL PhotoCD 17, IMG0015
The Southern Cross.
[Sept. 1926] Charles Kingsford-Smith (1897-1935) made the first Tasman flight from Sydney to Christchurch, arriving at Wigram Aerodrom on 10 Sept. 1928. His aircraft is pictured on arrival. Christchurch City Libraries, CCL PhotoCD 17, IMG0015
11 September 1928
G.W. Skellerup founds Para Rubber Company, New Zealand’s first retail rubber goods business at 175 Manchester Street. Christchurch soon became the centre of the rubber industry in New Zealand.

Street view of Para Rubber Company Ltd shop, Lower Hutt, Wellington Region. Negatives of the Evening Post newspaper. Ref: EP/1959/3235-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/30645364
Street view of Para Rubber Company Ltd shop, Lower Hutt, Wellington Region. Negatives of the Evening Post newspaper. Ref: EP/1959/3235-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.

13 September 1877
Christchurch Girls High School (designed by Thomas Cane) opens on the corner of Hereford Street and Rolleston Avenue. The school moved to its present Cranmer Square site in 1881. The original school is now part of the Arts Centre. The Cranmer Square building was demolished in 2011.

Christchurch Girls' High School, Armagh Street, Christchurch [192-?] Christchurch City Libraries, CCL PhotoCD 17, IMG0017
Christchurch Girls’ High School, Armagh Street, Christchurch [192-?]
Christchurch City Libraries, CCL PhotoCD 17, IMG0017
13 September 13, 1882
Woolston Town Board formed.

14 September 1976
Inter-island ferry service from Lyttelton ends with the last sailing of the Rangatira.

14 September 1985
Canterbury loses Ranfurly Shield to Auckland after a 3 year reign. Final score 28-23.

Christchurch chronology
A timeline of Christchurch events in
chronological order from pre-European times to 1989.

More September events in the Chronology.