“As long as the story is moving”: Margaret Mahy 21 March 1936 – 23 July 2012

Margaret Mahy displays

Two years ago, we lost “word witch” Margaret Mahy – a famous Canterbury local and a much loved children’s author.

Cover of The ChangeoverWhat better way to remember her legacy than with words. There is a session The Changeover: 30 Years On at the WORD Christchurch Writers & Readers Festival on Saturday 30 August 2014. Join Stuart McKenzie, co-writer and producer of the forthcoming Changeover movie, and young adult writers Elizabeth Knox and Karen Healey, as they discuss with children’s literature specialist Bill Nagelkerke the importance of this great teen novel and its ongoing relevance.

Words are also for consumption. Search our catalogue for books by Margaret Mahy.

Margaret used to be a children’s librarian at Christchurch City Libraries and our Margaret Mahy pages are full of ideas about writing as well as info on Margaret and her stories:

If the ideas don’t come I go for a walk, listen to music, do a bit of gardening, but I have so much work, it is always easy to go onto something else for a while. If it is urgent I make something happen, even if I am not particularly satisfied with the level of invention, because I think as long as the story is moving something is going to happen, and so far I have been lucky.

We are also lucky to have online the poem Down the back of the chair, and The word-eater written by Margaret Mahy, and illustrated by Bob Kerr. You might recognise the setting of the Central Library in Gloucester Street.

The Word-eater - written by Margaret Mahy; Illustrated by Bob Kerr

More Margaret

One thought on ““As long as the story is moving”: Margaret Mahy 21 March 1936 – 23 July 2012

  1. Robyn 23 July 2014 / 10:59 am

    I have my ticket for The Changeover: 30 years on. It is my favourite New Zealand book and I have so many wonderful memories of seeing Margaret at book festivals over the years it’s fitting that her legacy is remembered at them. Chairing a session with Margaret was probably challenging (in a good way) as her big brain roved over science, philosophy, art, music, maths and everything else she had considered in her unique way.

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