Recessive jeans

Cover of JeansMy parents shaped me way beyond my DNA. Hard as it is to believe, those two humble Scots forged my fashion destiny. To this day, my clothing choices hark back to them. Thanks Mom and Dad.

My father (normally a mild-mannered man) got in first when he forbade the wearing of denim jeans from under his roof. This was the Sixties for heaven’s sake. I did what any self respecting teen would do – developed an obsession with the faded blue fabric, hid my jeans at friends’ homes and married young.

My mother was not to be outdone. She loathed pink, thought sparkle in daywear was Common and honestly believed a nice frock was a fitting substitute for denim jeans. Bless her.

Even though fashion was such a fraught topic at home, I sewed a lot of my own stuff. Cover of 1960s Fashion PrintAnd, in what I now see as an early start in how to make life difficult for myself, I disdained Simplicity patterns and headed straight to Burda. Navigating their maze was the closest that I would ever come to Air Traffic Control. To this day I can smell the tailor’s chalk, feel the tracer’s wheel in my palm, hear Woodstock playing in the background, and see myself cutting my way round my absolute favourite fabric – Paisley.

I meet people who say they haven’t a creative bone in their bodies. They lie. Every single day, when we get up and get dressed, we make creative choices.  And you can reminisce on this in beautiful fashion books, you can even dream of featuring in The Sartorialist (the street fashion of real people). Truth is, what was everyday clothing to you all those years ago has probably attained iconic status by now.

Fast forward a few years. See that old lady in the boots, the jeans and the wildly patterned Paisley shirt?  That’s me. What will you be wearing when we meet?

Christchurch – this week in history (28 April – 4 May)

28-29 April 1983
Visit of Prince and Princess of Wales.

29 April 1974
Cr. David Caygill, aged 25, becomes the city’s youngest ever acting Mayor (for 5 days).

30 April 1971
6,000 protesters march against the war in Vietnam.

1 May 1975
Canterbury University completes its move from city to Ilam campus.

2 May 1872
New St Michael’s Anglican Church opens.

Image: St. Michael's and All Angels Church, Christchurch [ca. 1885].
St. Michael’s and All Angels Church, Christchurch [ca. 1885]. Christchurch City Libraries, File Reference CCL PhotoCD 12, IMG0080.
3 May 1851
George Gould opens shop in Christchurch. The business eventually became part of Pyne Gould Guinness and Co.

3 May 1985
6,000 Christchurch citizens rally against the All Black tour of South Africa.

4 May 1932
Christchurch Tramway strike. One of the bitterest in the city’s history, it lasted 16 days. There were many injuries and arrests among the strikers. The tram sheds were barricaded with barbed wire, and trams were fitted with wire mesh screens over their windows to ward off attacks.

4 May 1981
New southern arterial (Brougham Street to Curletts Road) opens.

Christchurch chronology
A timeline of Christchurch events in
chronological order from pre-European times to 1989.

More April and May events in our Christchurch chronology.