Digging our new stuff!

Justice Minister Geoffrey Palmer driving a front end loader on the construction site of the new Wellington District Court - Photograph taken by Merv Griffiths. Further negatives of the Evening Post newspaper. Ref: EP/1989/3997/30-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23013859
Justice Minister Geoffrey Palmer driving a front end loader on the construction site of the new Wellington District Court – Photograph taken by Merv Griffiths. Further negatives of the Evening Post newspaper. Ref: EP/1989/3997/30-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23013859

Every Thursday we pump out a few lists:

I am going to share with you some of this week’s newbies because there are heaps of interesting things coming out:

New Zealand

Curious about these …

New stuff from favourite authors

  • Worst. Person. Ever. by Douglas Coupland.
  • Doomed by Chuck Palahniuk
  • Peter Ackroyd is one of my go-to writers – he is gold in both fiction and non-fiction. His latest is called Three brothers. He writes about London better than anybody:

    Follows the fortunes of Harry, Daniel and Sam Hanway, born on a post-war council estate in Camden Town. Marked out from the start by coincidence, each boy is forced to make his way in the world – a world of dodgy deals and big business, of criminal gangs and crooked landlords, of newspaper magnates, back-biters and petty thieves.

Take a look at the lists, anything there you’d like to shout out for?

The Displaced Reader gets arty

Cover of FacebooksSometimes, if we’ve been good, librarians are allowed out to go visit other libraries. And sometimes, when we’ve been particularly amazing, we get to go to special places – places that may not be open to the public in the same way that, say, the Central Library Peterborough or the Linwood Library at Eastgate or Upper Riccarton libraries are.

The Christchurch Art Gallery library is one of those places, and recently a group of us went there for a visit. Located in the middle of the Art Gallery building, it’s a bit like the Gallery itself: closed but open. You can’t just wander in and poke around, but you CAN call the Gallery and make an appointment.

Fernbank Studio: away past elsewhereSo why would you do this?  People who visit here are looking for a deeper level of information than you might find on the shelf at your local library. If you are interested in art (and by interested, I mean you’ve looked at all the fantastic art books that the public library have, and still want more; or you are researching local artists both past and present, or want to know the background to the story behind the latest Court Theatre production), it’s THE place to go. There are specialist books and magazines, archives full of ephemera relating to artists and exhibitions, folders of press clippings and more.

The collection itself is primarily focused, naturally, on areas related to the Art Gallery, so you probably won’t find heaps of information on, say, the Italian Renaissance, but you WILL find, for example, things related to Picasso’s lithographs, because the Gallery owns one of them.

So for anyone with a deeper interest in all things arty, or a need for specialist help in specific areas, you could do no better than to arrange a visit – the librarian is warm and welcoming, and not at all scary, and there are treasures untold waiting to be discovered!