Kia ora. To celebrate Te Reo Māori  we are publishing kupu (words) every week.

Kīwaha (colloquialism)

Wehi nā
Oh my goodness

Kupu (word)

heihei
chicken

Te maha hoki o ngā heihei.
There are heaps of chickens.

 

Maori
Browse our Te Reo Māori resources.

29 July 1953
Aviation pioneer Richard W. Pearse dies in Christchurch. Pearse made one of the world’s first powered flights on or about 31 March 1902 in South Canterbury. He moved to Christchurch in 1921 and worked on his astonishing “convertiplane” over many years.
30 July 1976
7 Canterbury men in gold medal winning hockey team at the Montreal Olympics. See our page on Canterbury Olympians.

31 July 1856
By Royal Charter, Christchurch becomes New Zealand’s first city. Christchurch became New Zealand’s first city in 1856 under the terms of a royal charter. This was because it was the ‘seat’, or base, for a bishop. The Reverend Henry John Chitty Harper was consecrated, or made a bishop, by the Archbishop of Canterbury, and arrived with his family in Lyttelton on 23 December 1856.

More July and August events in our Christchurch chronology.

Christchurch music lovers – every week get your Freegal on and download your three free music MP3s (or one video and one MP3).

Cover of Just like heaven Cover of Through the wilderness Cover of We were so turned on Cover of The killer in you Cover of How many bands Cover of Come as you are

Download with your library card and PIN. What have you downloaded this week? Do tell!

Nau mai, haere mai koutou ki Te Kete Wānanga o Ihutai (Linwood Library at Eastgate) tēnei pō (Thursday night) from 6 to 7.30pm to listen to Takerei Norton share the story of his cultural mapping work with us.

tAKEREI

Want to know more? Here is some information from a post by Moata:

Takerei Norton (Kāi Tahi, iwi of Te Tau Ihu) works at Te Runanga o Ngāi Tahu.

He and his colleagues are charged with locating and documenting sites or “values” that have some historical or cultural signficance to the iwi with the aim of identifying the most iconic sites, so that efforts can be made to preserve, protect and improve access to them.

This involves research, delving into documents, published accounts, maps and also site visits where photography and filming take place, sometimes GPS is used, and the stories of the whenua and the people as recalled by kaumatua are recorded.

Moata spoke to Takerei about his work on this project, its goals and why it’s important for Ngāi Tahu.

Margaret Mahy displays

Two years ago, we lost “word witch” Margaret Mahy – a famous Canterbury local and a much loved children’s author.

Cover of The ChangeoverWhat better way to remember her legacy than with words. There is a session The Changeover: 30 Years On at the WORD Christchurch Writers & Readers Festival on Saturday 30 August 2014. Join Stuart McKenzie, co-writer and producer of the forthcoming Changeover movie, and young adult writers Elizabeth Knox and Karen Healey, as they discuss with children’s literature specialist Bill Nagelkerke the importance of this great teen novel and its ongoing relevance.

Words are also for consumption. Search our catalogue for books by Margaret Mahy.

Margaret used to be a children’s librarian at Christchurch City Libraries and our Margaret Mahy pages are full of ideas about writing as well as info on Margaret and her stories:

If the ideas don’t come I go for a walk, listen to music, do a bit of gardening, but I have so much work, it is always easy to go onto something else for a while. If it is urgent I make something happen, even if I am not particularly satisfied with the level of invention, because I think as long as the story is moving something is going to happen, and so far I have been lucky.

We are also lucky to have online the poem Down the back of the chair, and The word-eater written by Margaret Mahy, and illustrated by Bob Kerr. You might recognise the setting of the Central Library in Gloucester Street.

The Word-eater - written by Margaret Mahy; Illustrated by Bob Kerr

More Margaret

Some picks from our July picture books newsletter:

Cover of I love you baby Cover of Snoring Beauty Cover of This is a moose Cover of If I had a raptor

And to celebrate Te Wiki o te Reo Māori – and year round – here is a new list of modern classic picture books in Te Reo.

Cover of Te Anuhe Tino Hiakai  Cover of Te Mihini iti kowhai Cover of Kei te kihini o te po Cover of Te Tanguruhau Cover of Hairy Maclary Cover of E Kuri kino koe Flash

More Te Reo Māori booklists:

Subscribe to our newsletters and get our latest titles and best picks straight from your inbox.

Have you read any of these books? If so, we’d love your feedback!

23 July 1851
Pioneer William Deans among 28 lost in the wreck of the Maria in Cook Strait. Godley had tried to deprive the Deans and Hay families of their farms because he wanted only Anglicans to own land in the new settlement. The Deans brothers had sold sheep to pay the legal costs of fighting Godley’s high handed action, and William Deans was travelling to Sydney to buy replacement stock.

23 July 1857
First dramatic presentation in Canterbury, which featured Mrs Foley in “The Loan of a Lover” and “Betsy Baker” at the Lyttelton Town Hall. (see an advertisement in the 25 July 1857 Lyttelton Times).

Papers Past clipping from Page 5 Advertisements Column 2 Lyttelton Times, 25 July 1857

Papers Past clipping from Page 5 Advertisements Column 2 Lyttelton Times, 25 July 1857

26 July 1879
Canterbury Rugby Football Association (New Zealand’s first) formed. See our page on early rugby in Christchurch.

More July events in our Christchurch chronology.

Christchurch music lovers – every week get your Freegal on and download your three free music MP3s (or one video and one MP3).

Cover of Amon Amarth Cover of Simon and Garfunkel Cover of Fleetwood Mac Cover of Rick Wakeman Cover of Attitude Cover of Dark Horses

Download with your library card and PIN. What have you downloaded this week? Do tell!

On 17 July 1964 the Government Life Building opened in Cathedral Square. One of my favourite photos in our entire collection is this one of its construction. workers on top of Government Life. It is the Ōtautahi version of the famous Lunch atop a Skyscraper (New York Construction Workers Lunching on a Crossbeam).

The Post Office tower is dwarfed in this view, taken from the top of the Government Life Insurance building in the Square.  [Mar. 1963] CCL PhotoCD 11, IMG0059

The Post Office tower is dwarfed in this view, taken from the top of the Government Life Insurance building in the Square. [Mar. 1963] CCL PhotoCD 11, IMG0059

That iconic clock has been a landmark of the central city – when it was turned off lots of us missed looking up to see the time (and the temperature).

Government Life Building showing clock 12:45 4 July 1963 CCCPlans Government-Life-11-2

Government Life Building showing clock 12:45 4 July 1963 CCCPlans Government-Life-11-2

In the 1965 photo above, you can see it is 1:52pm.

Post earthquakes, Mike Hewson’s artwork Government Life Suspension reflected the building back for us.

Government life art by Mike Hewson. Tuesday 22 January 2013. Flickr: CCL-2013-01-22-IMG_2308

Government life art by Mike Hewson. Tuesday 22 January 2013. Flickr: CCL-2013-01-22-IMG_2308

Government Life building. Wednesday 18 June 2014. Flickr: 2014-06-17-IMG_0287

Government Life building. Wednesday 18 June 2014. Flickr: 2014-06-17-IMG_0287

The Government Life building is currently being demolished.
See more:

17 July 1964
Opening of the Government Life Building in Cathedral Square. It was the city’s first “high rise glass box”. The building’s rooftop clock and temperature readings became a familiar part of the Square.

Plans:

19 July 1988
Jock Orr, nicknamed “The Birdman” after befriending birds in Cathedral Square, dies in Christchurch.

20 July 1851
First church in Christchurch opened – later dedicated as St Michael and All Angels in 1859.

More July events in our Christchurch chronology.

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