Movies


3D craftsCheck our the Learning Centre holiday programme – starting after Easter. Digital storytelling, Lego animation, Minecraft craft in combination with the awesome MakerCrate crew – lots of fun and learning for kids.

Take a look at what the kids did in the January holidays.

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posterRoadshow Films and Christchurch City Libraries are giving you the chance to WIN one of 20 double passes to the movie 12 Years a slave.

12 Years a slave tells the incredible true story of one man’s fight for survival and freedom. In the pre-Civil War United States, Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor), a free black man from upstate New York, is abducted and sold into slavery.  Facing cruelty (personified by a malevolent slave owner, portrayed by Michael Fassbender), as well as unexpected kindnesses, Solomon struggles not only to stay alive, but to retain his dignity. In the twelfth year of his unforgettable odyssey, Solomon’s chance meeting with a Canadian abolitionist (Brad Pitt) will forever alter his life.
12 Years a slave in cinemas, February 6, 2014.

You can also read or listen to the book from our libraries.

View the movie trailer here
Rated:R16 – Contains graphic violence and sexual violence

How can you win? Just email and tell us the name of the slave whose story this is -  email us at competition@christchurchcitylibraries.com including your name, phone number, library card number and address. We’ll get in touch with the winners and hook you up with the tickets.

  • The competition is open to Christchurch City Libraries members.
  • Staff of Christchurch City Libraries and their immediate families are not able to enter.
  • Competition closes on Sunday 9 February.
  • Winners contacted on 10 February.

Please note: Tickets valid from 20 February at Event, Reading, Hoyts, Berkeley, Rialto or any participating independent cinema. Not valid on Saturdays after 5pm, on public holidays or at any “La Premier”, Cinema Delux, Gold Class, D-Box, Gold Lounge, Imax or Circle Lounge screeings. This voucher must be taken as offered and is not exchangeable, transferable or redeemable for cash and does not constitute a reserved seat. Cinemas reserve the right to refuse vouchers deemed invalid or tampered with. This ticket cannot be re-sold.

Journalism students at South Learning Centre are celebrating their hard work and pressured deadlines with some stunning results. The Canterbury Oracle, The Papercut and The South Library Bulletin newspapers are super pieces of work.

The In The News programme ran for 8 weeks in Term 4 of 2013 and involved students investigating the composition of a newspaper, suitable and varied content, the reality of advertisements and the pressure to produce articles and final publications under the duress of deadlines.

Students visited The Press to interview the chief editor, advertisement officer and experience the day-to-day running of Christchurch’s busiest newspaper.

In the News is an example of the interesting programmes our learning centres offer  to schools. They also run a great variety of after school and holiday programmes.

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cover for One flew over the cuckoo's nestMovies and TV series based on books are funny things. You either love them or you hate them. There is nothing more annoying than one you hate and nothing more satisfying than one which brings a book or even a character truly alive.

I came across an interesting blog listing ten favourite movie adaptations of books recently and it got me thinking – what exactly are my favourites? The author’s list was pretty idiosyncratic as I guess everyone’s will be and included The Planet of the Apes , Lolita , Brokeback Mountain and One flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. Of this list I think there is only one I have both seen and read – One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, although I loved both Brokeback Mountain and Planet of the Apes (the 70s version) as films.

He also liked Graham Greene’s The Fallen Idol which I have neither read nor seen. Greene was apparently deeply disappointed by most of the movies made from his books, although Brighton Rock is mentioned as acceptable and of course there’s The Third Man, one of my favs.  I wonder what he would have made of the 2005 version of The Quiet American, which I really enjoyed?

Many of my favourites include recent adaptations of Jane Austen books both in film and on television, which is a bit of a coup really, because its hard to satisfy when we know the books so well.

cover for High FidelityThe film versions of Atonement, The Remains of the Day and The Shipping News make my list because they captured the original so well. I also loved the film of Nick Hornby’s High Fidelity. An all time favourite remains To Kill a Mockingbird.

I’m a mystery buff so I can’t leave out the movie versions of Miss Smilla’s Feeling for Snow and Snow Falling on Cedars, The Constant Gardener, Red Dust and the recent version of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.

I don’t know how anyone can get it down to a list of ten. I haven’t even started on my favourite New Zealand ones like In  My Father’s Den and Sleeping Dogs.

What are you favourites and pet hates?

Check our great list of Books into Movies to extend your reading and viewing.

poster for MandelaRoadshow Films and Christchurch City Libraries are giving you the chance to WIN one of 20 double passes to the movie Mandela: long walk to freedom.

Based on his autobiography of the same name, this epic motion picture spans Nelson Mandela’s extraordinary life, from his childhood in a rural village through to his inauguration as the first democratically elected President of South Africa. Mandela: long walk to freedom is the thrilling story of an ordinary man who rose to the challenge of his times and triumphed – an intimate portrait of the making of a modern icon. Idris Elba (Prometheus) stars as Nelson Mandela, Naomie Harris (Skyfall) stars as Winnie Mandela, with Justin Chadwick (The Other Boleyn Girl) directing.

Mandela: long walk to freedom, in cinemas on January 30, 2014.

View the movie trailer and visit www.mandelamovie.co.nz . Rated: M- Violence and offensive language

How can you win? Just email and tell us the name of the prison where Mandela served most of his time -  email us at competition@christchurchcitylibraries.com including your name, phone number, library card number and address. We’ll get in touch with the winners and hook you up with the tickets.

  • The competition is open to Christchurch City Libraries members.
  • Staff of Christchurch City Libraries and their immediate families are not able to enter.
  • Competition closes on Friday 31 January.
  • Winners announced on 3 February.

Please note: Tickets valid from 13 February at Event, Reading, Hoyts, Berkeley, Rialto or any participating independent cinema. Not valid on Satudays after 5pm, on public holidays or at any La Premiere, Cinema Delux, Gold Class, D-Box, Gold Lounge, Imax or Circle Lounge screenings. This voucher must be taken as offered and is not exchangeable, transferable or redeemable for cash and does not constitute a reserved seat. Cinemas reserve the right to refuse vouchers deemed invalid or tampered with. This ticket cannot be resold.

Cover of The Most of Nora EphronWhen Meg Ryan mimed an orgasm in a diner in When Harry Met Sally and a nearby customer said: I’ll have what she’s having, that was Nora Ephron making her mark as one of the soon-to-be most quoted contemporary authors.

Nora Ephron (May 19, 1941 – June 26, 2012) was a screenplay writer and director of such formidable movie successes as Sleepless in Seattle, You’ve Got Mail, When Harry Met Sally,  and Julie and Julia, as well as the author of several books, columns, reviews and blogs.

Ephron made me  feel OK about growing up (Wallflower at the Orgy), breaking up (Heartburn) and growing older (I feel bad about my neck). She didn’t write to change our lives; instead her writing retells our lives to us in a way that sparks recognition, affirms who we are and makes us laugh while we are at it.

From this you can tell that I am a huge Ephron fan and the arrival of her biography  The Most of Nora Ephron is therefore a great joy to me. In fact, my life story can just about be summarised in Ephron quotes:

  • On education:If you love architecture, you need to do more than marry an architect.
  • On betrayal: If I had to do it again, I would have made a different kind of pie. The pie I threw at Mark made a terrific mess, but a blueberry pie would have been even better, since it would have permanently ruined his new blazer, the one he bought with Thelma.
  • On growing older: Our faces are lies and our necks are the truth. You have to cut open a redwood tree to see how old it is, but you wouldn’t have to if it had a neck.

I love her writing. I want to write like this.

How about you, do you have an author of whom you can honestly say:

I’ll have what she’s having?

The Golden Globes were on yesterday, and coming soon are the Oscars and Baftas. Part of the joy of movies lies in their soundtracks. Our free music download service Freegal has:

To find more, search on soundtrack, or look at Soundtrack under Genre. There are also sections for Bollywood and Tamil soundtracks.
Cover of Between a smile and a teaCover of The sound of pictures

You can find more soundtracks in our catalogue by searching for Motion Picture Music and by using other music databases in the Source.

poster for August: Osage CountyJust in time for the holiday season, Roadshow Films  and Christchurch City Libraries are giving you the chance to WIN one of 20 double passes to the movie August: Osage County.

Based on the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning play by Tracy Letts, the film looks at the lives of the strong-willed women of the Weston family. Their paths have diverged until a family crisis brings them back to the Oklahoma house they grew up in, and to the dysfunctional woman who raised them.

The large cast features Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Juliette Lewis, Margo Martindale, Ewan McGregor, Chris Cooper, Sam Shepard and Benedict Cumberbatch.

The movie is in cinemas on January 1.

View the movie trailer and visit www.augustosagecountymovie.co.nz to check the classification

So how can you win? Just email and tell us who is your favourite actor among the names we mentioned -  email us at competition@christchurchcitylibraries.com including your name, phone number, library card number and address. We’ll get in touch with the winners and hook you up with the tickets.

  • The competition is open to Christchurch City Libraries members.
  • Staff of Christchurch City Libraries and their immediate families are not able to enter.
  • Competition closes on Friday 20 December.
  • Winners announced on 23 December.

You probably already know that Disney has announced a release date for the next Star Wars movie. Apparently there at least three more to come. I have to admit that “Oh goodie” was not my first reaction. I was however interested to note that John Williams will be composing the music for the next release.

He composed the music for all the previous films and won a fistful of awards including an Oscar, Bafta and Golden Globe for his score to the first one.

His original soundtrack took  film music out of the doldrums at the time, reviving it after a less than glittering period during the 60s and 70s. Williams deliberately set out to reflect late 19th century orchestral music, apparently because Lucas wanted a soundtrack that grounded the

otherwise strange and fantastic setting in a well-known, audience accessible music.

Indeed it was often credited with creating a resurgence in interest in that music.

Curious to have another listen, I decided to try out some of it in Naxos Music Online which has quite a range. I’m not sure I would like to sit down and listen to the soundtracks in their entirety, but many of the themes seem to me to have stood the test of time and who could forget the original title theme? Have a listen and see what you think.

If you’re keen on sci fi film music Naxos and Music Online cover Stargate SG1, Star Trek (films) and Star Wars as well as the odd film like Dune.

Books as a single entity are all very well, but I’ve been thinking lately about the individual words that make up the things I read.

cover of Outer Dark

Cormac McCarthy will do that to you. Pick up any of his books, from The Road, the 2007 Pulitzer Prize winner,  to No Country For Old Men, Suttree, and the two that are coming out as movies this year, The Counsellor and Child of God and there is a wealth of wondrous words throughout.

Then the sun buckled and dark fell like a shout – Outer Dark

I’m currently reading Outer Dark, written in 1968. It is set in the last part of the 19th century, as near as I can tell, and this bleak, gut wrenching book is filled with wonderful words that fit this period and I found myself writing some unknown words on my bookmark to check later in the dictionary. He is known for making up words and I love this about him, he feels unfettered by just the English language, despite having a rich love of it.

…the house was grown with a rich velour of moss and lichen and brooded in a palpable miasma of rot. – Outer Dark

It had me thinking about how each word crafted into a piece of writing adds to the whole, some you don’t notice, but some leave you amazed or confused or thoroughly impressed. Does Mr McCarthy for example, go hunting dictionaries for words that are obscure to colour this prose, or is he just incredibly well read? His turn of phrase and the pictures he conjures in my mind are just beautiful sometimes, well, often. I often hear myself saying words like ‘cool’, or ‘awesome’ out loud to myself as I read, obviously I don’t share his breadth and depth of language.

By day the banished sun circles the earth like a grieving mother with a lamp – The Road

So I’ve compiled a little list of some of the discovered words from Outer Dark:

  • moiled - whirled or churned ceaselessly; twist; eddy.
  • penduluming: what a pendulum can be caught doing when it feels inclined to.
  • palmoutward- not a new word, he must have decided to run the two words together, just because he could.
  • malediction - the utterance of a curse.
  • recrements - refuse separated from anything; dross.
  • consubstantial -of one and the same substance, essence, or nature.
  • moonwraught – another lovely combo-word.
  • revenant - a person who returns as a spirit after death; ghost.

My two favourite words at present would have to plinth and moist, just for the way they sound when you say them.

McCarthy is rarely interviewed, avoids book tours or signings, and said about this:

I don’t think it’s good for your head, you spend a lot of time thinking about how to write a book, you probably shouldn’t be talking about it. You probably should be doing it.

Do you have favourite words, or authors whose use of language you find inspiring?

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